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Alabama resists racist Cabinet nominee

Alabama resists racist Cabinet nominee

first_imgAlabama occupiers at Sessions’ Mobile, Ala., office.Two dozen members of the Alabama NAACP occupied the office of U.S. Sen. Jeff Sessions in Mobile, Ala., on Jan. 3. Protests were also held at other Sessions’ offices in Alabama. The NAACP actions kicked off resistance to the far-right-wing Cabinet proposed by president-elect Donald Trump.Sessions, the Republican senator nominated to be U.S. Attorney General, was rejected for a 1986 federal judgeship when former Justice Department colleagues testified to his racist comments and behavior when serving as U.S. district attorney in Mobile.His comments included calling the NAACP “un-American,” the Ku Klux Klan “OK” and stating that a white lawyer defending Black clients “betrayed his race.” (New York Times, Jan. 8)During the occupation, six African-American and white protesters were arrested, including Cornell William Brooks, national NAACP president, who said the occupation was “an act of civil disobedience standing in the tradition of Rosa Parks.”Bernard Simelton, Alabama NAACP president also arrested, stated the group would have acted even if Sessions had never made his statements. “He has not been a champion for civil and human rights.”This is an understatement about the political record and beliefs of Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III, named like his father and grandfather for Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederate slavocracy, and P.G.T. Beauregard, a Confederate general.Heinous segregationist historyBorn in Selma, Sessions was educated at then-segregated, all-white Wilcox County High School and all-white Huntingdon College. Wilcox County, with 72 percent African-American population, is still the poorest county in Alabama because of the economic consequences of enslavement and apartheid-like conditions that persist.Sessions has continued to hold to segregationist patterns, including hostility to the 1965 Voting Rights Act prohibiting racial discrimination at the polls, which he called as “an intrusive piece of legislation.”In 2013 a Supreme Court decision nixed a core provision requiring Justice Department approval to change election laws in places with discriminatory histories. In the Times article, Sessions called that “good news … for the South.” That meant in coded language “good for the white South.”Sessions’ attack on African-American voting rights was most dramatically revealed in his 1985 prosecution, as U.S. District Attorney, of the “Marion Three.” These were Black community activists tried for so-called “ballot-fixing.”One activist, Albert Turner, had been an adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and one of the Selma marchers attacked by state troopers. Sessions’ case fell apart in trial as voter after voter testified to the activists’ innocence.Sessions has fought to keep additional state money from going to schools in poor districts. He has supported reviving chain gangs of Alabama prisoners. He has declared same-sex marriage a threat to “American” culture and gone to court to deny funding to LGBTQ student groups. He revealed his anti-woman bias when he said that Donald Trump’s videotaped boasts of sexual assault were not technically illegal.Sessions is OK with the Christian nationalist bias of an Alabama judge who illegally posted the Ten Commandments in his courtroom. Sessions is also OK with Trump “building a wall” against Latinx immigration and banning Muslims from entered the U.S.In 2015, Sessions was chosen as annual Keeper of the Flame by the Center for Security Policy, a Washington, D.C., think tank promoting anti-Muslim conspiracy theories.Wayne Flynt, professor emeritus in Auburn University’s Department of History, has followed Sessions’ career for decades. Flynt says, “His whole life, [Sessions] has been on the wrong side of every issue.” Senate hearings on nomination of Sessions to supervise “justice” as U.S. Attorney General began Jan. 9. (NY Times, Jan. 9)FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

A score of journalists arrested, a similar number beaten by police

A score of journalists arrested, a similar number beaten by police

first_img RSF at the Belarusian border: “The terrorist is the one who jails journalists and intimidates the public” According to reports from Minsk, around 20 journalists were arrested and a similar number were the victims of police violence during the demonstrations that followed yesterday’s announcement of President Alexander Lukashenko’s reelection victory. The protesters and journalists arrested yesterday are being tried today. Ilya Kuzniatsu, for example, was sentenced today to 15 days in prison on a charge of “participating in an illegal demonstration.”Reporters Without Borders voices its support for the statement released by its partner organization, the Belarusian Association of Journalists (BAJ), condemning the police brutality against journalists. The two organizations also condemn the fact that the police did not distinguish between journalists and protesters, thereby deliberately obstructing the work of the media. Many of the journalists were properly accredited by the local authorities. We urge the authorities to publicly condemn the use of violence and to identify and punish those responsible. We finally also deplore the official media’s one-sided coverage of the events of the past few days, which has prevented the public from having an informed view of this key moment in Belarus’ political life.According to the information gathered by the BAJ, at least 20 journalists were arrested yesterday and a similar number were roughed up by police. The victims included foreign reporters (Ukrainian, Russian and German) and local reporters working for both Belarusian and foreign media such as Agence France-Presse and the New York Times.Several journalists covering the protests in the centre of Minsk were attacked by special forces at about 7 p.m. yesterday as they were some 50 metres from opposition candidate Uladzimir Niakliaeu’s headquarters and were heading towards Kastrychnitskaya Square. After throwing flash-bang grenades, the police forced the journalists to lie face-down in the snow. New York Times photographer James Hill was hit when he tried to show his press card. The police also seized equipment and deleted photos and recordings.Shortly after midnight, Novaya Gazeta reporter Irina Kahlip was hit by police as she was being interviewed live by the independent Moscow-based radio station Ekho Moskvy.Several BAJ members were arrested along with Niakliayeu supporters during a raid on Niakliayeu’s headquarters. Others (including Aliaksandr Fiaduta, Julia Rymasheuskaya and Sergey Vozniak) were arrested at their homes. Some were released a few hours later but the location of several others, including Vozniak, is currently unknown.Mobile telephone communications became extremely difficult at around 8 p.m. yesterday while many independent and opposition websites were rendered inaccessible as a result of Distributed Denial of Service attacks. Site visitors were also redirected to “counterfeit” pseudo-sites containing false information. Anyone searching for such leading websites as Charter97.org, Belaruspartisan and Gazetaby, or the site of the newspaper Nasha Niva was directed to a counterfeit site with a similar address but ending in the suffix .in. The very popular blog platform Live Journal did not work very well yesterday either. Special forces raided the Charter 97 office in the early hours of this morning and several of its members were taken to KGB headquarters. Charter 97 editor Natalia Radzina meanwhile sustained a head injury at the hands of the police during a street protest and is reportedly still detained. The website is still inaccessible today. BelarusEurope – Central Asia News Receive email alerts May 27, 2021 Find out more BelarusEurope – Central Asia News Organisation December 20, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 A score of journalists arrested, a similar number beaten by police to go furthercenter_img Russian media boss drops the pretence and defends Belarus crackdown “We welcome opening of criminal investigation in Lithuania in response to our complaint against Lukashenko” RSF says May 28, 2021 Find out more RSF_en News June 2, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Belarus Help by sharing this information last_img read more

Limerick Youth Service host internet safety workshop

Limerick Youth Service host internet safety workshop

first_imgWhatsApp Email NewsLimerick Youth Service host internet safety workshopBy Editor – January 29, 2014 869 Linkedin TAGSDr. Maureen Griffininternet safetyLimerick Youth ServiceMusic Limerick Print Emma Langford shortlisted for RTE Folk Award and playing a LIVE SHOW!!! this Saturday Facebook Advertisement Watch the streamed gig for Fergal Nash album launchcenter_img Celebrating a ground breaking year in music from Limerick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Emma Sheanon, LIT; Dr. Maureen Griffin, UCC and Kate O’Driscoll, Limerick Youth Service at the internet safety workshop.Think before you text or post and instill a sense of caution not fear were two of the main recommendations from a workshop on social networking and internet safety held at Limerick Youth Service.Delivered by Dr. Maureen Griffin of UCC, the workshop highlighted the positive and negative features of social networking while stressing the consequences of adding someone as a ‘friend’ or posting a photo online.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Dr, Griffin stressed that ‘the aim was not to scare people into closing down their Facebook account rather make them aware of the results of some of their actions.’“Although the majority of young people who use Facebook or SnapChat do so in a safe manner, there are some vulnerable youngsters for whom the web can become a very lonely and unsafe place,” stated Dr. Griffin.With some people having several hundred ‘Facebook friends,’ Dr. Griffin asked the question, ‘would you class someone you just met in school or at a party as a friend in real life?’“By making someone a friend on Facebook you are inviting them into your life. Would you invite a stranger into your home, share photos and share some of the most intimate details of your life with them?”.“From the moment our children are born we look after them, teaching them the safe cross code etcetera, yet the internet is thrown at them without rules or guidelines”’ Dr. Griffin stated.She also discussed the growing issue of ‘Facebook Depression’ where people are presenting signs of being ‘clinically depressed’ from Facebook use.“Some people spend so much time on Facebook they start to judge their own life from what they see online. They see a friend’s pages with pictures of them on holidays and feel their own life is inadequate, but what they are seeing is the edited highlights of someone’s life”,  she explained.Dermot Troy, Limerick Youth Service, urged people who have concerns about sites such as Facebook or SnapChat to contact Limerick Youth Service.“People of all ages can have issues with social networking but the key is educating and understanding how the respective sites work”, said Mr. Troy who echoed Dr. Griffin’s suggestion to ‘instil a sense of caution not fear’ when surfing the web. #SaucySoul: Room 58 – ‘Hate To See You Leave’ Twitter #HearThis: New music and video from Limerick rapper Strange Boy Limerick Youth Service Calling for Additional Investment in Youth Work Sector Previous articleMother’s excuse for elaborate forged licence was unbelievableNext article#LimerickLive: Girl Band Editor last_img read more

ImmunoMet Therapeutics Receives IND Clearance and Orphan Drug Designation from U.S. FDA for IM156…

ImmunoMet Therapeutics Receives IND Clearance and Orphan Drug Designation from U.S. FDA for IM156…

first_img Facebook WhatsApp Twitter ImmunoMet Therapeutics Receives IND Clearance and Orphan Drug Designation from U.S. FDA for IM156 in Ideopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Completes Financing TAGS  Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleWorld champs in women’s curling canceled for 2nd year in rowNext articleTexas GOP Congressman Ron Wright, who battled health challenges including lung cancer and COVID-19, dies at 67 Digital AIM Web Support By Digital AIM Web Support – February 8, 2021 Twitter Local NewsBusiness Pinterest Pinterestlast_img read more

Claims misuse of prescription drugs in Strabane is major problem

Claims misuse of prescription drugs in Strabane is major problem

first_img By News Highland – May 28, 2020 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Pinterest Google+ Pinterest WhatsApp Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook It’s been claimed that the misuse of prescription drugs in Strabane is a major problem. The use Benzodiazepine, Opioids and Amphetamines is said to be increasing at an alarming rate, particularly among young people.It’s further claimed that the new type of drug use is leading to youths being hospitalised.Community Activist Michael McLaughlin says there’s an onus on the community to come together and tackle the issue:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/strabanesdfgdfgdfgdfdrugs1pm-2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twittercenter_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th AudioHomepage BannerNews Claims misuse of prescription drugs in Strabane is major problem WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Google+ Previous articlePolice in Strabane appeal over hit and runNext articleTwo meter rule not feasible for schools in September – INTO News Highland DL Debate – 24/05/21 last_img read more

… in brief

… in brief

first_img… in briefOn 9 Sep 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. This week’s news in briefWork-life balance Just over half of UK workers believe they are able to maintain a healthywork-life balance in their organisation, according to research by Mercer HumanResource Consulting. The survey of 3,500 staff reveals that women’s perspectiveon work is more positive than men’s, with 56 per cent believing they canmaintain a healthy balance, compared with 49 per cent of men.  www.mercerhr.comGermans have it easy Workers in Germany have the best work-life balance in the world – spendingjust a sixth of their time at work, according to the Organisation for EconomicCo-operation and Development. Germans work an average of 1,447 hours a year,Americans 1,805, the Japanese 1,859, and Britons 1707. Koreans are theworkaholics with 2,447 hours.  www.oecd.orgLeaving leave alone A third of Europe’s workers fail to take their full annual leave, with morethan a fifth of the UK’s employees not taking all their holidays. Onlinerecruiter Monster surveyed more than 1,000 Britons and found that 24 per centpassed up holidays because they were too busy or felt the company needed themtoo much.  www.monster.comHealth warning One of the largest Government employers in the North of England has issuedhealth warnings to staff after a deadly bacteria was found in drinking water.The Inland Revenue offices in Newcastle-upon-Tyne had to close two waterdispensers after traces of the Legionella bacteria – which can causeLegionnaires’ disease – were found. The HSE is investing.  www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Benefits of Clean Power Plan are clear

Benefits of Clean Power Plan are clear

first_imgStates will gain large, widespread, and nearly immediate health benefits if the Environmental Protection Agency sets strong standards in the final Clean Power Plan, according to the first independent, peer-reviewed paper of its kind, published today in the journal Nature Climate Change.The researchers analyzed three options for power plant carbon standards: upgrading plants, shutting them down, and changing how energy is delivered and used. The last has the greatest health benefits, and is projected to prevent an expected 3,500 premature deaths in the United States every year, with a range of 780 to up to 6,100, and ward off more than 1,000 heart attacks and hospitalizations a year from air pollution-related illness. The other options provide fewer estimated health benefits and could even have detrimental health effects, according to the paper.The study comes at a pivotal time for climate policy, as the EPA prepares to release the final Clean Power Plan this summer. The plan is the nation’s first attempt to establish standards for carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. It is also viewed as an important signal of U.S. leadership in the run-up to international climate negotiations in Paris in December.“If EPA sets strong carbon standards, we can expect large public health benefits from cleaner air almost immediately after the standards are implemented,” said Jonathan Buonocore, a research fellow at the Center for Health and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a co-author of the new paper.The researchers mapped the air quality and related health benefits for the entire continental United States under the three options for the Clean Power Plan. They found that all states and types of communities would see improved air quality under strongest option. Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Texas would post the greatest health gains, with an estimated 230 to 330 premature deaths prevented each year.“An important implication of this study is that the largest health benefits from the transition to cleaner energy are expected in states that currently have the greatest dependence on coal-fired electricity,” said Dallas Burtraw, Darius Gaskins Senior Fellow at the nonprofit organization Resources for the Future, another co-author of the paper.Power plants are the nation’s largest source of the carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to climate change. They also release other pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particulate matter — precursors to smog and soot that harm human health. The study looked at the added health benefits, or co-benefits, of carbon standards from reductions in these other pollutants.The results of the analysis in the study are surprising. Upgrading power plants, as favored by some groups, results in slightly lower air quality and modest adverse health effects. Shutting down the plants entirely, while making the deepest cuts in carbon emissions, does not produce the biggest health benefits because it does not result in end-user energy efficiency. Changing the way energy is delivered and used prevents almost twice as many premature deaths as the next-best option for every ton of carbon dioxide reduced, the study found.“The bottom line is, the more the standards promote cleaner fuels and energy efficiency, the greater the added health benefits,” said Charles Driscoll, University Professor of Environmental Systems Engineering at Syracuse University, the paper’s lead author. “We found that the greatest clean air and health benefits occur when stringent targets for carbon dioxide emissions are combined with compliance measures that promote demand-side energy efficiency and cleaner energy sources across the power sector.”The results panned out like the story of the “three little pigs.” One option is like the house of straw — it seems protective but it isn’t. Another is like the house of sticks — it is stronger than straw but ultimately doesn’t hold up. The final option is like the house of bricks — it uses all the right building blocks and has the best outcome.The findings demonstrate that the EPA’s policy choices will determine the clean air and public health benefits for states and communities. The option in the study with the greatest health benefits is the one that is most similar to the draft standards released by the EPA last June. So, the good news is that the formula in the draft Clean Power Plan is on the right track.The new paper also has important international implications and brings much-needed attention to the benefits of climate change solutions. “The immediate and widespread local health benefits of cleaner air from policies to address greenhouse-gas emissions can provide a strong motivation for U.S. and global action on climate change,” Driscoll concluded.A follow-on study analyzing the added benefits of power plant carbon standards for water, visibility crops, and trees is expected out this summer.— By Marissa Weiss and Kathy Lambertlast_img read more

The collective effort

The collective effort

first_img Fostering hope Editor’s note: This story was updated on April 24, 2020.Rye BarcottHarvard Business School, Harvard Kennedy SchoolCo-founder and CEO of With Honor Action, a nonprofit organization that aims to bridge partisanship in U.S. politics by supporting military veterans in CongressGAZETTE:  How is the coronavirus impacting With Honor Action?BARCOTT: This health crisis called for fast, decisive action and cooperation to put country above all else — the type of scenario that many veterans trained for and executed while in the military. Under great pressure, 20 military veteran members of Congress who are part of the For Country caucus worked together to successfully push for expanding service opportunities for volunteers who want to serve right now and rebuild in the months to come. Specifically, they advocated for establishing a Public Health Ready Reserve Corps and limiting legal liabilities for volunteer health professionals, both of which are critical as our health care system sees capacity surges as never before. GAZETTE: How is your community pulling together right now?BARCOTT: During moments of crisis, Americans have supported each other and we’re already seeing campaigns refocus efforts toward safely helping those in need. Several military veterans running for Congress have been called up to serve in active duty to help with the coronavirus pandemic. Looking toward our recovery, more Americans will be needed to answer the call to serve.GAZETTE: What brings you joy at the moment?BARCOTT: Previously, I traveled most workdays for With Honor Action. So, it’s been a joy to spend so much time with my kids, who are 9, 7, and 6 months, and see how they learn with our homeschooling led by my amazing wife, Tracy Barcott, a child psychologist who completed her postdoc at Boston Children’s Hospital. I hope there will be many positive unintended consequences from this crisis, not the least a deeper appreciation for and more investment in our nation’s teachers. Rye Barcott has a strategy to bridge the political divide in Congress: Elect more veterans Related At the Radcliffe Institute, Alaskan Inupiaq poet and Harvard alum Joan Naviyuk Kane keeps her language and culture alive through her art and her family. To Serve Better Stories of people committed to public purpose and to making a positive difference in communities throughout the country. Related As DNA-based technologies, from CRISPR to ancestry tests, make rapid advances, Marnie Gelbart wants to increase public understanding of how they work From food law to criminal justice, the HLS Mississippi Delta project puts the legal needs of Mississippians front and center Learn more at toservebetter.harvard.edu.Interviews were edited for clarity and length. Colleen GreeneHarvard School of Dental Medicine and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthPediatric dentist at the Children’s Wisconsin, a former president of the American Student Dental Association, and a current board member of the American Dental Political Action CommitteeGAZETTE: How is the coronavirus impacting Children’s Wisconsin?GREENE: The supply chain for medical equipment such as masks has been so disrupted by the pandemic that we have critically low supplies throughout the hospital system. Leadership is taking extraordinary measures to preserve supplies so that urgent patients can be best served. All nonurgent clinic visits are canceled, which has changed our lives completely this week.GAZETTE: How is your community pulling together right now?GREENE: With so many children at home unexpectedly following school closures, our neighborhoods have implemented new traditions, such as “window walks” where families can interact from a distance while spending time outdoors. Our local elementary school parent organization has put up a food pantry to support those in greatest need.GAZETTE: What brings you joy at the moment?GREENE: I am grateful to have two toddlers, who have absolutely no concerns about the present global crisis. Their goals are eating, playing, and sleeping. My husband and I are mindful that the simplicity of their lives right now is a blessing for us. They force us to embrace the core responsibilities and silly moments of our lives right now. The most serious question on the mind of my 3-year-old son right now is: “Why do we have eyebrows?” Emily Broad LeibHarvard Law SchoolClinical professor of law, director of the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic, and deputy director of the Harvard Law School Center for Health Law and Policy InnovationGAZETTE: How is coronavirus impacting the Mississippi Delta Project?BROAD LEIB:  While my work with the Mississippi Delta Project has not changed or shifted yet, Harvard’s Food Law and Policy Clinic has been busy developing resources and undertaking emergency response efforts to address COVID-19. For example, we have been urging closed universities and institutions to donate their excess food to emergency food-assistance institutions. To assist with this we’ve created an easy-to-understand guide full of important links and tips. We also developed one issue brief outlining ways that Congress and the USDA can support local and regional food systems and farmers in the wake of the crisis, and another issue brief on ways that the government can leverage existing systems to deliver food to families in need. Last week, we wrote about these and a range of other concerns as the pandemic’s impact on our food and agricultural systems evolves. Our current research and response efforts will enable us to better support our Mississippi Delta Project partners in the coming months. As they face new challenges stemming from COVID-19, we are prepared to help.GAZETTE:  How is your community pulling together right now?BROAD LEIB:  We are collaborating with a number of food-system stakeholders, such as ReFed, a nonprofit committed to reducing food waste, Feeding America, which is a national network of food banks, and National Sustainable Agriculture Coalition, a group of grassroots organizations advocating for better food and agricultural policy. Together, we are working to identify high-priority food-system issues that have surfaced due to COVID-19. In the coming weeks, we plan to ​continue working with our partners, including those in the Mississippi Delta Project, to see how we can best support their work during this public health crisis.GAZETTE:  What brings you joy at the moment?BROAD LEIB: I’m certainly finding moments of joy. This has been a hard time and a difficult adjustment for everyone, but I am in a better situation than many, and I feel grateful for that. I am also amazed to see some of the ingenuity in how businesses, communities, and state and local governments are reacting to try to lift up and help those in need. For example, we have seen event venues, hotels, and universities such as Harvard, Tufts, and Boston College donate their surplus food to local food banks as they closed their doors or shifted to remote learning. We have heard from many emergency food organizations that they are changing their practices to make it easier to get food to vulnerable people in their homes. Neighbors are trying to find ways to help each other with food purchase and delivery. Many organizations are setting up resource pages and hotlines. There is so much need and the challenges will continue to grow for those affected by the virus or by the economic fallout, but as a start it has been incredible to see the many ways that communities are working together during this unprecedented time. Speak, memory Expressing genes While working to improve dental health care for the foster children of the greater Milwaukee area, Colleen Greene and her husband decided to welcome two foster children into their family. Magnolia state blooming United front Marnie GelbartHarvard Medical SchoolDirector of programs for the Personal Genetics Education Project (pgEd) at Harvard Medical School, and a co-principal investigator of Building Awareness, Respect, and Confidence through Genetics (ARC)GAZETTE: How is coronavirus impacting your work with pgED?GELBART: The pgEd team has the luxury of being able to work remotely, and so we started shifting to our home offices early in March. Like so many other people, we’ve had to clear a lot of activities we had planned from our calendars. It’s disappointing for sure, but the right decision in the interest of public safety. The silver lining is that pgEd is able to focus our energies on creating digital resources that will allow us to engage with more people — now, while we are in the mode of physical distancing, and in the future.GAZETTE: How is your community pulling together right now?GELBART: First and foremost, people are looking out for each other and sharing information. And, in the HMS Department of Genetics (which is home to pgEd), we’re seeing researchers in the labs collecting personal protective equipment and reagents and donating them to hospitals, where they are urgently needed. In terms of pgEd’s community, we do a lot of work with schools, many of which who are grappling with how to run virtual classrooms and offer educational enrichments online. We hosted our first virtual workshop for teachers on March 31, and we’re looking to add on a series of teacher chats, as a space for teachers to ask questions of one another and exchange ideas. And pgEd is fortunate to be working with energetic collaborators, who are eager to find new pathways for continuing our work together. One example is the amazing team from the PBS station in D.C., WETA, which will be broadcasting the new Ken Burns film, “The Gene: An Intimate History,” on April 7 and 14. We’ve been partnering with WETA on their public-engagement initiatives and teacher programming around the film, and the COVID-19 situation has thrown a wrench in many of those plans. So we are seeing this as an opportunity to get creative.GAZETTE: What brings you joy at the moment?GELBART: That’s a great question. I have two answers. The first is finding all sorts of new ways to socially connect while we are physically distancing ourselves. At lunchtime today, I took a break with my kids to join a live-streaming exercise session with [the online children’s physical activity program] BOKS Kids. And that leads me to my second answer — my family. I am enjoying every minute with my kids that is taking the place of the 10 hours each week I usually spend commuting. Erica Mosca, Ed.M. ’11, knows that being the first one in your family to go to college can be hard. As the founder of Leaders in Training, her nonprofit helps ease the way for other first-generation college students.Read more Explore Related Related Related The spread of COVID-19 is quickly changing the way that nearly all organizations operate, especially groups committed to public service and social support systems. The Gazette spoke to some of the Harvard students, alumni, faculty, and staff from the “To Serve Better” project about how the global pandemic is affecting their community-focused organizations. Erica MoscaHarvard Graduate School of EducationFounder of Leaders in Training, an organization that helps prospective first-generation college students from East Las Vegas high schools finish their degrees and work toward becoming leaders in their home state.GAZETTE: How is the coronavirus impacting Leaders in Training?MOSCA: Our strategy as an organization is to continue the program virtually, make sure foundational needs are met, and contribute to the larger space with content. Understandably, with lack of infrastructure, Clark County School District — where most of our students attend — has no virtual learning for students. Though we are not a school and do not teach academic content, we have made a commitment to support our students to have access to virtual programs if they choose. We have furiously worked to get our programs ready to continue running, but now virtually. We hope that we can also support East and North Las Vegas during these trying times. From the community, for the community.GAZETTE: How is your community pulling together right now?MOSCA: Our community is pulling together in huge ways. Families have donated their extra supplies to other families. Parents are reading books in languages from Tagalog to Spanish, recording them, and letting us post and share them with our parents as well as to the wider community. Our college students have texted me, asking how they can help and get involved. They have volunteered to do everything from babysit to bringing supplies to people. Now we are figuring out a way that we can support our students and families by transporting them to the food banks or get them the resources they need without us doing mission creep or wraparound services, which we do not usually do. The community has truly come together to support one another during these scary times.GAZETTE: What brings you joy at the moment?MOSCA: What brings me joy is that our community is relying on one another for support and supporting the broader community at large, led by students and parents themselves. Joan KaneHarvard College and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced StudyAuthor of poetry and prose collections including “Hyperboreal” (2013) and “Another Bright Departure” (2019), Kane is the 2019‒2020 Hilles Bush Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced StudyGAZETTE: How is coronavirus impacting your work?KANE: Cambridge Public Schools has transitioned to homeschooling, which means that my work is limited to a few hours a day at best. However, we now incorporate Inupiaq language into our daily lives. My sons and I set aside time every day to write and read. My big projects — an essay collection, a longer nonfiction work, and a book of poems — have taken a backseat to family well-being. The situation gives me new insight into the lives of my grandmother and other survivors of the 1918 flu pandemic. It also has caused my sons and me to devote extra hours before Radcliffe [went remote] to digitize the King Island Inupiaq Dictionary draft we’d envisioned as a yearlong project.GAZETTE: How is your community pulling together right now?KANE: Indigenous communities are pulling together to practice social distancing to protect our elders. As a writer and a teacher of writing, I’ve been encouraging the writers I’m working with to take the time to ground themselves in their current manuscripts. I’ve also been reading books more devotedly and have encouraged others to do the same. It’s healthy for one’s perspective.GAZETTE: What brings you joy at the moment?KANE: The words of others bring me joy right now — my children with me, their patience, and the way their conversations with family and friends over FaceTime and the facility with which they have continued to connect with others through language is astonishing. I am also grateful for the generosity and patience I have seen in others to so many during this time. As a single mother practicing social distancing, it can be hard to think of indefinite amounts of time like this, but to see the necessity and difference of intentional behavior is quite compelling. Related To Serve Better The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

This Jacket is My Marriage Counselor

This Jacket is My Marriage Counselor

first_imgI have a lot of winter jackets. Jackets for powder days, light jackets for warmer spring skiing, puffy jackets for bitter cold night skiing, waterproof shells for those days when it’s 36 and raining but I still want to ski anyway. The closets in my house overflow with waterproof/breathable/soft shell/hard shell/Gore-Tex/PrimaLoft…it’s become a point of contention for my wife, who’s concerned that I’m using more than my share of closet space. This is how you know you’re living a privileged, first world life: you argue over the sheer amount of expensive jackets you own and have to build a new closet in the basement specifically for ski gear. I’m not proud of it. But in my defense, the Southern Appalachians has some pretty schizophrenic weather in the winter. Look at the weekly forecast and you’re likely to see conditions ranging from 22 degrees and snowing to 33 and freezing rain to 55 and a light drizzle. You could head out in the morning and the conditions could vary so widely, that during  a single adventure you could need a puffy, a breathable shell and a waterproof shell. That’s three jackets for one day in the mountains. A man about the woods needs a lot of jackets to handle that sort of range in conditions. Marital fights over closet space are inevitable. Columbia has stepped in as a sort of marriage counselor with their new OutDry Hooded Jacket, a hybrid insulated/waterproof jacket that has successfully eliminated the need for any other jacket this winter. The Hooded is stuffed with warm 650-fill down and wrapped in Columbia’s OutDry tech, which is a two-layer waterproof system that has proven to be more breathable than its competition over the last few years I’ve been able to use it. It also has more stretch than its counterparts. So, put all that together in this jacket and you’ve got a legitimately waterproof puffy. I’ve worn this thing in a downpour, I’ve worn it on light powder days, I’ve even worn it in the worst imaginable conditions: during a night ski session when it was 24 degrees and Breckenwolf had every single snowgun blasting. That’s like skiing through a hurricane of snow, over and over. The end result was the same no matter what conditions mother nature and man threw at the Hooded: I stayed dry and toasty warm. Do you get what I’m saying here? I no longer need that waterproof hardshell. Or that mid-layer puffy on cold days. Or the soft shell, for that matter, because this thing breaths like a champ too. With the OutDry Hooded, I have a jacket that works all winter, regardless of the conditions. It’s become the jacket I reach for day in, day out, whether I’m walking the kids to school or looking to earn some turns by skiing up and down Breckenwolf. In a single season, the OutDry Hooded has rendered my other jackets obsolete. Not that I’m going to get rid of all those other jackets in my house. We just did that closet addition. Plus, I don’t want my wife to think she won the War of the Winter Jackets. I can’t give her the upper hand. My only complaint? I could’ve used an internal zipper pocket for my phone, but I feel like an entitled asshole just bringing that up. Forget I said anything.last_img read more

Pompeo Says Venezuelans, Not US, Will Restore Peace in Venezuela

Pompeo Says Venezuelans, Not US, Will Restore Peace in Venezuela

first_imgBy Agence France-Presse (AFP) August 10, 2020 The United States seeks to restore democracy in Venezuela, but it will be the Venezuelan people who will “ultimately” do it, top U.S. diplomat Mike Pompeo said on July 9.During a press conference with international media, Pompeo said that the Donald Trump administration will continue to do “all we can do” to bring about Nicolás Maduro’s exit from power, as Washington considers his 2018 reelection to be illegal.Pompeo added that this includes economic pressure on Caracas and its partner, Cuba, by imposing a series of sanctions, “but we have also, importantly, built out a global coalition to try and help the Venezuelan people achieve their objectives.”“In the end, what the United States is trying to achieve is restoring democracy, and the Venezuelan people will be the ones who will ultimately restore that democracy,” Pompeo said.“It is indeed the Venezuelan people who choose to serve in the Venezuelan military,” he added, in reference to the role that the Venezuelan Armed Forces might play to generate a change of regime in Venezuela.The military leadership is seen as one of the main pillars of support for Maduro, who clings to power with the help of Russia and China, despite the offensive of parliamentary speaker Juan Guaidó.Pompeo said that, in addition to the Lima Group, which gathers over a dozen Latin American nations and Canada to facilitate a democratic and peaceful solution to the crisis in Venezuela, some 60 countries have recognized Guaidó as the country’s duly elected national leader.“This is the process that we intend to continue to support what the Venezuelan people want,” the secretary of State for the Trump administration said.“We’ve watched Maduro’s corrupt court system. We’ve watched him now try and take over political parties. And we remain convinced that the Venezuelan people see this for what it is, and that they will respond in a way that reflects their deep desire to restore order and democracy to their own nation,” Pompeo concluded.Venezuela’s highest court, aligned with the current government, removed the leader of Guaidó’s political party and gave its control to an adversary on July 7. In mid-June, the high court had already taken similar measures against two other important opposition parties.Electoral authorities have called the next legislative elections in Venezuela for December 6, but the main opposition political parties will boycott the ballot.last_img read more