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Horoscope: October 21, 2020

Horoscope: October 21, 2020

first_imgTamia Banks Tamia Bankshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tamia-banks/ printA baby born today has a Sun in Libra and a Moon in Sagittarius until 2:44 a.m., when the Moon enters Capricorn.HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020:Inspirational, attractive and witty, you’re distinctly different from those around you. It’s your singular journey this year that makes you successful. Once your thoughts and emotions are balanced, there is even more success. If single, you need to ask yourself what you really want, as relationships don’t often work for you. If attached, you laugh and have fun with your partner, who adores you. TAURUS satisfies your need for stability.The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-DifficultARIES (March 21-April 19)★★★★★A presentation before a group could inspire the confidence of business associates. Do the necessary research connected to your career goals. The additional information will open a real window of opportunity. Tonight: Congratulate yourself on a job well done.TAURUS (April 20-May 20)★★★★★You’ll be able to appreciate all that you have today. Practices such as affirmation and visualization will manifest in real wealth. A breakthrough can be expected for those who have been abroad and working to perfect a project. Tonight: A significant change for the better.GEMINI (May 21-June 20)★★★Today opens an old door. A riddle is answered or a secret is revealed, bringing a sense of closure. Be aware of the financial patterns of a partner. If your security has been threatened before, examine financial documents with special care before signing. Tonight: Relax.CANCER (June 21-July 22)★★★★An eccentric but intriguing individual can change your plans. Be careful of the expectations you have of others. Only offer help or advice if it is requested three times. Welcome the opportunity to try something new. Tonight: Fun date night.LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)★★★Good health habits are a must. Serve yourself only healthy foods today. An animal who strays to your door may belong to someone else. Don’t consider it a permanent part of your household yet. Tonight: A sense of fate is in the air.VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)★★★You’re delighting in the company of one you care for. Today marks a turning point. Both meetings and partings can occur. Either an attraction ends abruptly or becomes a more significant part of your life. Tonight: Avoiding extremes is your key to wellness.LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)★★★★Interesting events, conversations and visitors make the domestic environment livelier. Hang an updated photo of your family in your workspace to symbolize the interaction of home with professional life. Tonight: Helping family members reach goals with their living arrangements.SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)★★★★★Today promises a very active schedule. A position of versatility will help. Read current magazines and newspapers. You’re about to learn something valuable quite by accident. Ideas suggested in casual conversations are worth examining. Tonight: Impromptu journeys add dimension to your life.SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)★★★Today finds you faced with some unusual rigidity. Play by the rules patiently; make the most of the status quo. Shortcuts won’t work right now. Hesitate if you’re contemplating a residential or workplace change. Tonight: A reprieve is granted.CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)★★★★★Step by step, the Goat perseveres. Today brings a fresh start regarding relationships. Old business regarding partnership and legal matters is concluded. Take the lead in making suggestions and arranging projects. Tonight: You create a memorable impression on influential individuals.AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)★★★Today points to a need for some extra rest and retreat. Your energy will be replenished and you’ll be able to get organized during hours of peaceful solitude. By tomorrow you will be ready to be more interactive, but for now pace yourself. Tonight: Early bedtime.PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)★★★★Longtime acquaintances will get in touch. You’ll be quite surprised by the changes in their lives. Expect a favorable turn of events regarding a new business or employment opportunity. A flurry of interesting invitations can come along. Tonight: Money matters brighten.Born today: Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772), author Ursula K. Le Guin (1929), actress Carrie Fisher (1956) Tamia Bankshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tamia-banks/ Previous articleWhat we’re reading: Melania Trump will not attend Pennsylvania rally, murder victim identified 35 years after found dead in FloridaNext articleStudents encourage others to vote in this year’s presidential election Tamia Banks RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Horoscope: May 1, 2021 Horoscope: April 28, 2021 Facebook Twitter Tamia Bankshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tamia-banks/ Facebook Linkedin ReddIt Horoscope: April 29, 2021 Horoscope: May 2, 2021 + posts Horoscope: April 30, 2021 Twitter ReddIt Linkedin Horoscope: April 29, 2021 Horoscope: April 30, 2021 Horoscope: May 1, 2021 Tamia Bankshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/tamia-banks/ Horoscope: May 2, 2021last_img read more

Neighborhood Church’s Green Council Presentation: “Where Does Our Drinking Water Come From?”

Neighborhood Church’s Green Council Presentation: “Where Does Our Drinking Water Come From?”

first_img Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Dr. Chuching Wang of the Metropolitan Water District will speak on “Thirst for Knowledge: Southern California Water Resources.”Coastal Southern California is a semi-arid area, but this 5,200 square mile area with perennial sunshine has almost 20 million people and a trillion dollar economy. Water is one of the most precious natural resources for this population and economy. In addition to telling us where our drinking water comes from, Dr. Wang will give an update on the California drought, El Nino, and Integrated water resources planning. He hopes that we will realize how precious every drop of water is in Southern California, and that water conservation will be part of the living habit of Southern Californians instead of a drought emergency measure. For more information, contact Peter Eisenhardt.Neighborhood Church, 301 N. Orange Grove Blvd., Pasadena, (626) 449-3470 or visit neighborhooduu.org. Subscribe Faith & Religion Events Neighborhood Church’s Green Council Presentation: “Where Does Our Drinking Water Come From?” Sunday, February 21, 10:30 a.m., NH Living Room Article and Photo courtesy of Neighborhood Church Published on Monday, February 8, 2016 | 12:58 pm More Cool Stuff Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Top of the News center_img Make a comment Herbeauty6 Trends To Look Like A Bombshell And 6 To Forget AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou’ll Want To Get Married Twice Or Even More Just To Put Them OnHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyRobert Irwin Recreates His Father’s Iconic PhotosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHow To Lose Weight & Burn Fat While You SleepHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyDo You Feel Like Hollywood Celebrities All Look A Bit Similar?HerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * First Heatwave Expected Next Week Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 18 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m.last_img read more

Kids, role models stride together at Juneteenth Youth in the Park

Kids, role models stride together at Juneteenth Youth in the Park

first_imgHome Local News Kids, role models stride together at Juneteenth Youth in the Park Previous articleGOOD NEWS: Names in the NewsNext articleGUEST VIEW: FERC thousands of American lives admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Deaven Alexander, 10, left, leads the 50 meter dash final ahead of his sister Jaydah Alexander, 12, right, and Strawberry Kirk, 14, during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. The celebration continues with events today and Tuesday at Woodson Park.Saturday’s event marked the seventh year organizing Youth in the Park for Young, a BCCO board member, who said the event was growing in participation, and featured track and field activities for the first time this year.Young said she and organizers relished the chance to not only get the kids together to play out in the sun, but also to surround them with volunteers who can act as positive role models.Officials from Odessa Fire and Rescue, the Ector County Sheriff’s Office and the Odessa Police Department made their way to event, along with the various volunteers from different business and backgrounds across Odessa who were helping out.“We do this because we know they’re our future, and we want to teach them good values,” Young said of the children. “If they can see older women, men participating and helping, that is the drive that we want to leave with them.”OFR firefighters gave kids the tour of a truck Saturday, before joining them out in the park to watch them race during the track and field activities.“It’s always fun. Kids love firetrucks. It’s always fun to come show them,” said OFR captain Darren Wilkerson.“Thanks for being our role models,” Young waved to Wilkerson and the others from OFR as she passed by them between events later in the park.Organizers were sure to introduce younger volunteers to the children, too, to try to set a good example.“A lot of these kids, they don’t have, really, somebody to be a role model in their lives,” said Khalil Cavil, a Permian graduate who studied at Odessa College and is on his way to continue his education at Dallas Baptist. He spoke with the kids gathered together Saturday.“Just to impact them in a way to say, ‘You can be something,’” he continued.“‘You have a purpose, to be in the fire department; to be in the sheriff’s office; to be within your community.’ That’s why I volunteer, just to impact and to be involved.”Juneteenth is celebrated on June 19 annually, to mark the day in 1865 that slow-moving news of the Confederacy’s surrender finally reached Texas, marking the abolition of slavery in the state.The BCCO’s celebration continues today with afternoon events in the auditorium at Blackshear, and evening concerts at Woodson Park.Young and other organizers will bring kids together for another Youth in the Park event Tuesday, for an event featuring hula hoop, dance, soccer, football and more fun — and not without volunteers and role models trying to leave a positive impression.“We’ve got all these people pulling together to change these young people’s lives,” Young said. “That’s where we’re headed.”BCCO’s Juneteenth Celebration scheduleSunday1 p.m., 35 and older legends basketball tournament, Woodson Boys and Girls Club3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., Sewell Gospel Celebration, at Blackshear Auditorium6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Clean Comedy Clinic Inc., at Blackshear Auditorium7 p.m. to 9 p.m., “Blues” by DJ Blue Boy and DJ B. Reed, at Woodson Park main stage9 p.m. to 11 p.m., performances by local rappers, at Woodson Park main stage9 p.m. to 11 p.m., youth dance, Woodson Park south endTuesday9 a.m. to noon, Youth in the Park, Woodson ParkNoon to 1:30 p.m., annual Juneteenth Picnic, Woodson ParkNoon to 4 p.m., health fair, Woodson Park7 p.m. to 8 p.m., Shout Cheerleading, Woodson Park main stage8 p.m. to 11 p.m., Mark Lyon’s True to Soul Band, Woodson Park main stage Jada White, 8, cent, holds the “Jaws of Life” with the help of Odessa Firefighter Bryce Handy during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. Alyssa Acosta, 9, jumps a hurdle during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. Twitter 1 of 7 By admin – June 17, 2018 Twitter 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School Frank Haynes, 7, shows off the Juneteenth relay baton during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. WhatsApp Jaydah Alexander, 12, jumps a hurdle during a 100 meter hurdle race Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’  Children hang out with Odessa Fire/Rescue firefighters during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. Facebook OC employee of the year always learning Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Local News Kids, role models stride together at Juneteenth Youth in the Park Lesia Young looked over to see the kids running in the sun — and as she watched, she might as well have seen growth happening out there, in every sprint, every jump and every step.The annual Youth in the Park event brought together dozens of community kids again on Saturday at Woodson Park, as part of the ongoing Juneteenth Celebration this weekend in Odessa.“It’s going great,” Young said with a smile, as the children ran through track and field races in the park.Basketball games, dancing, face painting and balloons were also all part of the youth activities, which kicked off the second day of the Black Cultural Council of Odessa’s annual holiday celebration. Deaven Alexander, 10, left, leads the 50 meter dash final ahead of his sister Jaydah Alexander, 12, right, and Strawberry Kirk, 14, during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. Abjaha Conaway, 3, gets ger face painted during Juneteenth’s Youth in the Park Saturday morning at Woodson Park. Southern Style Potato SaladFruit Salad to Die ForFoolproof Roasted Pork TenderloinPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Colley Senior Complex hosts Veterans Breakfast

Colley Senior Complex hosts Veterans Breakfast

first_img By The Penny Hoarder By Jaine Treadwell Email the author Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Colley Senior Complex hosts Veterans Breakfast The Colley Senior Complex in Troy honored the veterans of America’s wars with its annual Veterans Day Breakfast Friday at the Troy Recreation Center.Catherine Jordan, complex director, said it was the senior center’s tremendous privilege to honor to the veterans on their day but the veterans are heroes and should be honored every day for their sacrifices and service.“If it were not for our veterans, we would not have the freedoms that we enjoy today,” she said. “We should keep them in our thoughts and prayers every day of the year.” Sgt. Major Anthony Johnson, JROTC instructor at Charles Henderson High School, was the featured speaker for the breakfast event. He, too, spoke of the service of all veterans, whether it was on the home front or defending freedom in some distant land.“This is our day,” Johnson told the assembly of veterans, their spouses and children. “This is our day to be honored and to also honor those who have served to gain and preserves the freedoms that we have.”Johnson said he lived half his life as a child and the other half learning from children. Latest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day “And, I consider the wives of men in the military veterans,” he said. “The wives make sacrifices, too. They keep the family together and the home. They accept the responsibilities and pay the bills. They are American veterans. Today is about us. It’s about veterans. It’s our day.”Johnson gave the veterans an opportunity to speak and veterans of America’s modern wars accepted. Billy Jackson, an Army aviator with the Army Air Corps during World War II, spoke about commitment to country and dedication to a cause greater than one’s self.Charlie “Sarge” Dunn, a veteran of Korea and Vietnam, gave God the glory for “seeing me through” during times of war. Freddie Turner spoke of his time as a medic in Vietnam. “My eyes still leak at all I saw,” he said. John Lester served in the Air Force and expressed his hope that all of those who enjoy the freedoms for which the country’s veterans fought and died “get it” when it comes to what it means to be an American.Jordan thanked the veterans for their service to their country and to their fellowmen.“We will not forget you, your service and sacrifices,” she said. “Thank you all. This is your day.” Goshen moving on: Eagles handle Indians in opening round win The Goshen Eagles returned a favor on Friday when they knocked off Southern Choctaw 27-6 in the opening round of… read more Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Book Nook to reopen “Children say things in a simple way,” he said. “The spoke simply about Veterans Day at Charles Henderson Middle School Thursday.As a part of the program, the students discussed “What is a veteran?”“They learned that a veteran is one who fights for freedom in foreign lands,” Johnson said. “They also learned that veterans are those who never go to war but serve their county in times of peace and here a home.”The students learned that veterans can be women as well as men. Skip Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Sponsored Content Print Article You Might Like Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Published 3:00 am Saturday, November 11, 2017 123PrevNextStartStop Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Baron Oil to acquire Singapore’s SundaGas

Baron Oil to acquire Singapore’s SundaGas

first_imgSundaGas’ main assets include the Chuditch offshore block in Timor-Leste, and the Telen block in offshore Indonesia Image: Baron Oil to acquire SundaGas. Photo: courtesy of rawpixel from Pixabay. UK-based oil and gas exploration and production company Baron Oil has agreed to acquire Singapore-based exploration & production company SundaGas.Under the terms of the agreement, Baron would acquire the entire issued share capital of SundaGas (Holdings).As part of the transaction, Baron will issue two of its shares to each SundaGas shareholder. In the combined company, Baron will hold a 33% stake and the rest will be owned by SundaGas. The combined company will be named as SundaGas PLC.SundaGas’s main assets to be acquired by Baron OilSundaGas’ two main assets, which will be acquired by Baron Oil, include the Chuditch offshore block in Timor-Leste, and the Telen block in offshore Indonesia.SundaGas Banda Unipessoal (SGB), a wholly-owned subsidiary of SundaGas, holds a 75% operated working interest in the Chuditch block.Located approximately 185km south of Timor-Leste, Chuditch PSC covers approximately 3,571km2, in water depths of 50-100 metres. The block contains the Chuditch-1 gas discovery, which was drilled by Shell in 1998 and encountered a 25m gas column.Under the agreement, Baron is entitled to be issued a stake of 33.33% in SundaGas (Timor-Leste Sahul) (SGTL), the holding company of SGB.Also, SundaGas Indonesia Telen owns 100% working interest in the Telen Production Sharing Contract (Telen PSC), offshore Indonesia. It contains the Hiu Marah drill-ready prospect.Baron executive chairman Malcolm Butler said: “The SundaGas team brings impressive management and technical expertise in south-east Asia and it makes sense for us to combine forces with them. The Chuditch production sharing contract has the potential to contain a substantial gas accumulation and is an asset of significant value.“This proposed transaction will be transformational for our shareholders and we look forward to reporting back on progress in due course.”The completion of the transaction is subject to several conditions including the execution of a detailed legally binding sale and purchase agreement (SPA).last_img read more

Explosions In The Sky Announces 20th Anniversary Tour Dates

Explosions In The Sky Announces 20th Anniversary Tour Dates

first_imgExplosions In The Sky will hit the road this fall in celebration of their 20th anniversary. The instrumental, ambient-rock band from Texas came together and began releasing music back in 1999, and will look to celebrate their two successful decades of carving out their own little niche in the industry with 23 shows scheduled to begin on September 11th in Arizona.The two-month tour will take the rock quartet across much of the United States when it starts out along the west coast with shows at Mesa Arts Center in Mesa, AZ (9/11); Hollywood Palladium in Los Angeles, CA (9/12); Fox Theater in Oakland, CA (9/16); The Depot in Salt Lake City, UT (9/19); Ogden Theatre in Denver, CO (9/20); And the Taos Mesa Brewing Amphitheater in Taos, NM (9/22). Following a few weeks off, the tour will head east for the next leg of shows with stops at The Mill & Mine in Knoxville, TN (10/10); The Ritz in Raleigh, NC (10/11); Knockdown Center in Brooklyn, NY (10/13); and Asbury Hall in Buffalo, NY (10/14).The final leg of the tour will see the band hitting markets across the midwest starting at Masonic Temple Cathedral in Detroit, MI (16); The Sylvee in Madison, WI (10/18); The Palace Theater in St. Paul, MN (10/19); The Bourbon Theatre in Lincoln, NE (10/22); and the Criterion Theater in Oklahoma City, OK (10/24).Presale tickets for the tour will be available beginning on Tuesday, April 16th, at 10 a.m. Local with the password, “EITS99”. General on sale will follow starting this Friday, April 19th, at 10 a.m. local time. Fans can head to the tour page on the band’s website for more information.Explosions In The Sky 20th Anniversary Tour Dates: 9/11 – Mesa, AZ – Mesa Arts Center9/12 – Los Angeles, CA – Hollywood Palladium9/13 – Santa Ana, CA – Yost Theater9/14 – Point Reyes, CA – Love Field9/16 – Oakland, CA – Fox Theater9/17 – Sacramento, CA – Crest Theater9/19 – Salt Lake City, UT – The Depot9/20 – Denver, CO – Ogden Theatre9/21 – Boulder, CO – Boulder Theater9/22 – Taos, NM – Taos Mesa Brewing Amphitheater10/10 – Knoxville, TN – The Mill & Mine10/11 – Raleigh, NC – The Ritz10/12 – Sayreville, NJ – Starland Ballroom10/13 – Brooklyn, NY – Knockdown Center10/14 – Buffalo, NY – Asbury Hall10/16 – Detroit, MI – Masonic Temple Cathedral10/17 – Bloomington, IL – Castle Theatre10/18 – Madison, WI – The Sylvee10/19 – St Paul, MN – The Palace Theater10/20 – Maquoketa, IA – Codfish Hollow Barnstormers10/22 – Lincoln, NE – The Bourbon Theatre10/23 – Lawrence, KS – Liberty Hall10/24 – Oklahoma City, OK – Criterion TheaterView All 20th Anniversary Tour Dateslast_img read more

Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library awards $74,000 for new research on the history of women in America

Radcliffe’s Schlesinger Library awards $74,000 for new research on the history of women in America

first_imgThe Arthur and Elizabeth Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study today announced the 35 grant recipients for 2014. The Schlesinger Library, part of the Harvard Library, has awarded $74,000 to fund projects that explore the library’s vast collections, which provide a unique window into the lives of remarkable and everyday women and families.“These grant recipients come from near and far to undertake important research on women’s lives, gender dynamics, and societal issues,” said Marilyn Dunn, executive director of the Schlesinger Library and librarian of the Radcliffe Institute. “Scholars and students alike will use the library’s diverse materials to amplify women’s voices and contribute to a better understanding of our world.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

Design, inspired by ‘the trays’

Design, inspired by ‘the trays’

first_img 10The trays have inspired many terminologies, or trayisms, to describe the space and the people. The Pit and Chauhaus are the critique and café areas on the first floor. Though busy preparing for a final critique, Remus Macovei (right) and a fellow student find time to socialize. 14“I for the most part remember the names of all the students I taught here, but I always remember who they were sitting with. It becomes very important,” says Mariana Ibanez. “I’ve had students that loved each other. I’ve had students that fought like brothers and sisters. I’ve had students that ended up married.” Andres Camacho ’18 (from left), Steven Meyer ’18, and Joanne K. Cheung ’18 work intently within their cluster. 3“Studios are on five receding terraces, over which a single canted steel-truss roof is suspended … The large, undifferentiated spaces accommodate a variety of uses and are adaptable to change. It is expected that ease of communication between all members of the School will be facilitated by the open circulation system,” reads the November 1969 press release announcing the groundbreaking ceremony for Gund Hall. 2“The trays have their own internal ecology, like an aquarium. Everything feels connected, a self-organizing machine — a single vector takes you from a group pinup past an intense one-on-one discussion to a spontaneous encounter with unexpected visitor to lunch at the Chauhaus. The trays calibrate all of life at the GSD,” says Eliot Noyes Professor of Architectural Theory and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Michael Hays, who first encountered the trays in 1978. GSD students Pu Zhang ’17 (left) and Mengdan Liu ’16 intently examine their work. 16Energy is telegraphed across the space. During final reviews, observers can smell the stress in the atmosphere. David Schoen ’18 looks for his work at one of the printer stations. 1“I’m interested in ideas and places that are unconventional. And the trays are a very unique space. When I see a student who is not pushing the limits, I just need to ask them to look up, see where they are, and be inspired,” says associate professor of architecture Mariana Ibanez. 13 “I always enjoy looking at the transformation in the trays throughout the semester. At the beginning it is a very organized, clean space that is anonymous. And as the semester progresses, things begin to accumulate. Sometimes people build very large objects that don’t quite fit in the space, or many small models,” says Ibanez. “At the beginning, you see the people. At the end, you see the things that people make. I love having the chance to experience that progression.” 7The trays can be “intensely social,” says Althea Northcross ’16. “It’s home away from home.” Lanisha Blount ’17 (left) and Keith Scott ’17 share a moment of levity between work sessions. 15Creativity is on display throughout the trays. A student needs only to glance up to find inspiration. 17“The type of materials used for architectural production range from sketches, or very abstract representations of a world of ideas, to precise, more sophisticated objects for presentations, reviews, and publications,” says Mariana Ibanez. 8“Studio work ranges from practical, real-life projects such as shelters for climatic disaster events, a tower, or housing, to fantastical and experimental projects,” Mariana Ibanez says. 11Thomas Batchelder, coordinator of undergraduate studies for the Department of Art and Architecture and former student of landscape architecture at the GSD, describes the trays as a “flowing angle of rabbit warrens stacked up a mountainside like a favela.” 9Azzurra Cox ’16 references Michel Foucault’s modern panopticon in describing the trays, where everyone can see everything—“see and be seen.” 5“Each desk is a world,” says Mariana Ibanez. 4“There is an incomparable energy to the trays. You can see everybody working away. You can see people during their creative process,” says Ibanez. Students Fabiola Guzman ’17 (left) and Kimberly Orrego ’17 work together on a project. 18“Even spaces that are quite fantastic, if you are able to go there often, can sometimes lose their aura,” says Ibanez. “The trays don’t. It doesn’t matter how many years or how much time I spend in the trays. Every time I’m up there, I feel it is an incredible space. It doesn’t lose its magic.” 12“The essence of the building — integration of disciplines, contact, equality, open-endedness, inquiry, flexibility — is represented by the arrangement of the studio space,” reads a GSD newsletter from 1968. Jenny Ni Zhan ’17 (from left), Andrew Madl ’17, and Ambrose Luk ’16 utilize the space as it was intended. Before Gund Hall was built in 1972, the Harvard Graduate School of Design was scattered across five separate buildings. Architect John Andrews M.Arch. ’58 brought the school together under one roof. At the heart of the new construction was “the trays,” an enormous multi-tiered studio space.“The studios on all floors are open to each other, each studio tray overlapping the one beneath it and tucked under the one above,” reads a 1969 article in Architectural Forum. “The building gathers all studios into one open, integrated environment. Gone are the separate identities cherished by competing department ‘empires.’”Past architectural writings refer to the floors as balconies, terraces, tiers, lofts, and steps. Andrews, in the architectural drawings, denoted each level as “studio,” but the term “the trays” won out. “The idea has been to eliminate walls, physically and ideologically, among departments; this is a school for the study of the total environment,” wrote critic Ada Louise Huxtable in a 1972 article in The New York Times.Finding inspiration in the light-filled space, students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, urban planning, and design studies spend endless hours producing, discovering, and innovating. In 1970, Andrews called his creation “a roof covering a series of tiered open spaces — open for open-ended intellectual growth.” 6“The students, they are extraordinary,” says program coordinator Edna Van Saun. “They conceive an idea in just a few weeks, like composing a piece of music.” Louise Roland ’17 (from left), Dana Kash ’17, and Jenna Chaplin ’17 collaborate on landscape architecture coursework.last_img read more

Panel discusses Uyghur humanitarian crisis, steps for activism

Panel discusses Uyghur humanitarian crisis, steps for activism

first_imgThe Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies hosted an engaging panel Monday with experts from institutes around the world entitled “Xinjiang and the Uyghurs: Religion, Oppression and Geopolitics.” The discussion focused on the genocide and forced labor of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang and around China, and what the world needs to do to take on the human rights violations.The event started off with Mahan Mirza, the executive director of the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion and Liu Institute faculty fellow, who was the moderator for the event. Each of the panelists spoke for about ten minutes about Uyghur minorities and the current crisis. The first panelist to speak was Rachel Harris, a professor of ethnomusicology at SOAS University of London. Harris began by talking about her nearly 20 years of travel to the Xinjiang Uyghur autonomous region. She explained how the area has always been under tight control, and she’s been afraid of the police and bureaucracy. Over the past couple of years, however, Harris has felt the situation becoming even more extreme. She talked about the genocides and forced labor the Uyghur people have gone through. “We need to keep raising awareness and putting pressure on international organizations to respond to this issue,” Harris said. “And we’ve seen enough alarming reports on the drastic birth control policies, and the uprooting of communities that this is a deliberate policy of erasing Uyghur culture and identity. … These are human rights abuses on a massive scale.”Harris then went on to focus on the idea of culture and cultural heritage, specifically within the context of the cultural genocide and massive destruction of the Uyghurs’ heritage by the Chinese government. Speaking specifically of the Autumn festival, a large event and religious tradition that would happen every year in which the Uyghurs pray to the saints, Harris said this festival was bulldozed and closed down by the Chinese government and labeled as a “terrorist gathering.” “It’s interesting to reflect on why exactly they would do that,” Harris said. “Why they would go to the trouble of bringing these bulldozers deep into the desert to knock over this brick building? And really, the only answer I can think of, is that they want to cut off from the culture and erase all traces of their history from the landscape.” James Millward, the second panelist, is a professor of intersocietal history at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Millward spoke about the prison camps, re-education camps, sterilization and forced labor by the Chinese government placed on the Uyghur Muslims. He also discussed the interplay between the Chinese Communist Party and the United States government.The third panelist, Perin Gürel, associate professor of American studies at the University of Notre Dame, discussed international responses to the Uyghur crisis, focusing on the Islamic world and Turkey in particular. She said Turkey has been the only Islamic country to eventually speak out, which speaks a great deal to the implications of human rights and politics, and the constructed nature of state identities.  “All in all, I think it behooves us to examine which states are being called to condemn the actions of which states, and why, and by whom instead of assuming a normative Muslim unity, it is helpful to see the mobilizations, and limits of this concept,” Gürel said.The panel then moved to a question period, where the panelists were asked what college students can do to help the Uyghurs. Gürel spoke about the concept of fake news and polarized political bubbles.“I think maybe one step is being aware of the warping of reality” Gürel said. “Everywhere, including in the United States and including places we might think reality thrives like places of higher education.”Harris said that because of how often disheartening news comes out of the region, it is tempting to be pessimistic.  “Still, I think that’s not a reason to stop speaking out right and stop educating,“ Harris said. “There are always ways to put on pressure and all pressure has to be good.”The panel concluded with Millward discussing the effect college students can have as consumers on producer choices, from avoiding shopping at stores and buying brands that use Uyghur labor to not watching the new live action film “Mulan” on Disney Plus, as the film thanked organizations within the Chinese government that are oppressing the Uyghurs.Tags: panel, The Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, Uyghur genocidelast_img read more

9 Wonderfully Weird Things We Learned About Fish Scribe & Star Larry David

9 Wonderfully Weird Things We Learned About Fish Scribe & Star Larry David

first_img Related Shows 8. His next play idea already failed Fish is still in previews, but he’s already got his second play ready to go. What is this gem in waiting? An evening of all the failed SNL sketches he ever wrote. David was an SNL writer for the ’84-’85 season (except for one little blip where he quit in a huff, then came back on Monday like nothing had happened. Sound familiar, Costanza fans?) but only one of his sketches ever made it on air. Better late than never, eh? 2. He’s not crazy about the theater Not only does David not care for acting on stage, he doesn’t even like being an audience member. “You go there, it’s a lot of hustle and bustle,” he told David Letterman. “It’s like going to the airport for me. I don’t care for it, and I’m nervous for the actors that they’re going to forget their lines. It’s scary.” And he’s none too happy about being on the other side of the footlights, either: “Not a day goes by that I don’t regret it.” 7. He hoped for a plague David’s characters (including his TV alter-ego George Costanza) are great at weaseling out of things they don’t want to do, but with Fish in the Dark he’s finally found something he can’t escape. “Even with all my deceptive skills I cannot squirm out of this. I got out of the army by pretending to be a psychopath, but this, this I can’t get out of. I thought the Ebola virus might do it. I thought, ‘Hey there’s a plague—fantastic.’ They’ll shut down the city; there’ll be no Broadway. I’m done. It was great news.” Not sure “great” is the word we’d use here, Larry, but we see what you’re saying. 5. He has hangups about costume changes David may be getting used to this whole “life in the theater” thing, but there’s one thing he’s not ready to budge on: dressing room rules. “Yeah, I don’t like getting undressed in places,” he said. So he asked director Anna D. Shapiro why he can’t just wear his first costume in his hotel room—and he’s got her convinced. “At first, I thought it was the silliest question,” Shapiro says. “But then I thought, Why couldn’t we give him a rack of clothes at his hotel?” David: 1. Theater conventions: 0. 3. He is, however, a stage veteran This is David’s Broadway debut, but he’s not a total naïf when it comes to the stage—he starred in a production of Charley’s Aunt when he was in the eighth grade, thankyouverymuch. The film version starred Jack Benny, and he played the Jack Benny role. “I don’t remember it being terrible,” he told Howard Stern. “I think my parents liked it.” From David, that’s practically ecstatic praise. 6. He’s only doing it for the hotel sex One thing David has made abundantly clear is that he had no intention of starring in this play when he wrote it, but now that he’s stuck he’s found a silver lining—he’s living in a hotel during his New York tenure. “In the hotel if you have a sexual encounter, and of course I expect to, it’s over, they’re gone,” he told Letterman. “There’s no messy goodbyes or emotional scenes, it’s all done. And it’s hotel sex too, which…come on. Hotel sex is different.”  View Commentscenter_img Larry David, everyone’s favorite professional curmudgeon, has plenty of experience with the small screen. As the co-creator and head writer of Seinfeld (and the voice of George Steinbrenner), he helped redefine the television comedy—and he did it again playing “himself” on HBO’s hilarious and insanely popular Curb Your Enthusiasm. Now he’s taking on a whole different kind of challenge: His first play Fish in the Dark, in which he is also an unlikely star, opens at the Cort Theatre on March 2. He’s been hitting the media circuit to talk about the play, which centers on 15 characters as they deal with a death in the family, and he’s shared some pretty interesting tidbits along the way. No surprise here—he’s not your typical Broadway star. 1. He thinks he can’t act In an unusual move for someone whose name is on a Broadway marquee, David is the first to admit that he’s no actor. He’s only taken one acting class—ever—and even then he knew it wasn’t for him. “You know how I realized I’m not an actor?” David told Vanity Fair. “Because if I’m on the stage my instinct is to talk to the audience, not the other actors.” Needless to say, he had a lot to learn. “When we started, he didn’t know stage left, stage right, upstage, downstage,” said co-star Rosie Perez. Good thing he’s got vets like Perez and onstage wife Rita Wilson looking out for him. 9. Above all, he’s a really, really nice guy Larry David’s TV personas make him seem unbearably prickly; even Anna Shapiro was worried about getting into the rehearsal room with him. “I thought he would be neurotic in a not-amusing way,” she said. “I thought I would encounter the darkness behind his humor. And I just haven’t had that. I find him to be incredibly warm, very friendly, really nice, and in the relationship really respectful, really generous. I can’t say enough about him as a person.” Awww! Welcome to Broadway, Larry David. Fish in the Dark 4. A tragedy inspired Fish in the Dark David is famous for mining comedy from his everyday life, and this play is no exception. He got the idea for Fish in the Dark from his friend and lawyer Lloyd Braun (who also inspired the well-coiffed, over-achieving character on Seinfeld of the same name). After Braun’s father passed away two years ago, David went to visit him. As Braun told Vulture, “We’re sitting shiva, and Larry’s over the first day at my house, and I was telling him a whole bunch of stories of what had gone on for the last few days, because some were crazy and hilarious, like a relative flying in from wherever ’cause they want to be in show business. It’s an outlet for me. We start talking about how it’s incredible material. Larry says, ‘It’s a Broadway play.'” Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 1, 2015last_img read more