2021 is the Year of the Political Prisoner

2021 is the Year of the Political Prisoner

first_imgThe U.S. “justice” system, like every institution of a capitalist state, is a weapon designed and wielded by the billionaires to beat workers into submission. Special bodies of armed troops, deputized by the ruling class, round up workers by the millions and contrive laws to justify locking them in dangerously toxic conditions.This is how capitalists can extract profit from the unpaid labor of workers, while simultaneously keeping them under lock and key to prevent them from organizing to fight back. The defining feature of all U.S. instruments of class warfare is white supremacy, so the violence inflicted on the working class is disproportionately and predominantly aimed at Black, Brown and Indigenous workers.Under these conditions, the incarceration of every worker is political in nature. The system that cages them is political — the result of carefully designed policies ratified by the state. The poor and oppressed people who fill U.S. concentration camps, whether they are called “migrant detention facilities” or “correctional facilities,” are there because of the politics of capitalism and white supremacy.But the term “political prisoner” has special resonance, because it is used to refer to those revolutionary soldiers who were specifically targeted for threatening the existence of this rotten, unjust system. Many of them are members of revolutionary organizations that the state sought to destroy through subterfuge, assassinations and frame-ups.To identify an incarcerated worker as a political prisoner is to say that the state went to extraordinary lengths and expended special resources to concoct a reason to lock them away from their comrades and community. Political prisoners are prisoners of consciousness who fight for the liberation of their nation, their people or the working class as a whole.The FBI and other police forces in the U.S. fought viciously to kill the revolutionary character of the social upheaval of the 1960s and ’70s. Dozens of political prisoners who were ensnared in this fascist assault are still in prison to this day.Mumia Abu-Jamal, journalist, scholar and former Black Panther, still in prison after 39 years, is perhaps the most internationally recognized political prisoner in the U.S. The slogan “Free Mumia!” is an indictment of white supremacy as a whole.Black Liberation Army member Assata Shakur is one political prisoner who escaped execution by incarceration. The people of Cuba warmly welcomed her as an exile.Ana Belén Montes has been in a federal prison since 2001 for providing classified information to the government of Cuba, which helped protect that socialist project from U.S. interference.The administrations of Barack Obama and Donald J. Trump have created a whole new generation of political prisoners. Some have avoided immediate imprisonment, but are still in the state’s crosshairs. They include Red Fawn Fallis and Michael “Rattler” Markus, Oglala Lakota Water Protectors who faced off against federal troops at Standing Rock to fight for the environment and their sovereignty in 2016; Anthony Smith, a Philadelphia organizer who was targeted by the feds for his community leadership during the Black Lives Matter uprisings; and Chelsea Manning, who was convicted of espionage after she publicly exposed proof of U.S. war crimes in Iraq.And outside North America, the U.S. and its proxies lock up those leaders who endanger its most important imperialist projects, most notably in Palestine — where Zionist occupation forces currently have Ahmad Sa’adat, Georges Ibrahim Abdallah, Tareq Mattar, Khalida Jarrar, Khitam Saafin and Mays Abu Ghosh in custody.‘Let’s get it done in ’21’Since mass incarceration is a form of class warfare, another way to characterize political prisoners is as prisoners of war. This is one way elder revolutionaries were characterized in a recent statement issued jointly from the Safiya Bukhari-Albert Nuh Washington Foundation, the Guillermo Morales/Assata Shakur Community & Student Center, the Coalition to Free Russell Maroon Shoatz “NOW,” the New York City Community Survival Program and the Universal Zulu Nation — World Department of Community Affairs. It called upon the movement to make 2021 the “Year to Free All Captured U.S. Political Prisoners.”“Contrary to the racist statements by today’s fascist police unions,” the statement read, “our elders are absolutely no threat to carry out physical participation in the resuming of any war between the old police forces, who not only also took part in the conflict but who still have never been charged, convicted or imprisoned for their own armed police actions, murders and illegal wars on our Black, Brown [and] Oppressed communities during the Anti-Vietnam War, Pro-African Liberation, Civil Rights, Human Rights, Black Liberation, Ecological, Educational, Cultural [and] The U.S. New Afrikan/Puerto Rican/Native American Independence Movements.”The statement, signed by veteran Black Panther-Zulu King Sadiki “Bro. Shep” Ojore Olugbala, includes a list of 23 elder political prisoners who were born before 1955 and who must be released immediately, especially as the COVID-19 pandemic rages through the prisons. The virus has already killed 2,133 U.S. prisoners.The crisis is only getting worse. According to the Marshall Project, over 200 prisoners have died so far this month, making January 2021 the deadliest single month so far of the coronavirus pandemic for prisoners.Demand their immediate release!Workers World Party demands the immediate release of all political prisoners, especially those for whom the COVID-19 virus poses a heightened risk. In solidarity and in joining the call to make 2021 the Year of the Political Prisoner, we raise the names of some of these revolutionary soldiers:Sundiata Acoli – 83 years old – Black Panther Party, Black Liberation Army – Imprisoned for 46 yearsJoseph Bown – 72 years old – Black Liberation Army – Imprisoned for 49 yearsVeronza Bowers – 74 years old – Black Panther Party – Imprisoned for 46 yearsAbdullah Malik Ka’bah (aka Jeff Fort) – 73 years oldEl Rukn – Imprisoned for 37 yearsRuchell Magee Cinque – 81 years old – Black Guerrilla Family – Imprisoned for 50 yearsJaan Karl Laaman – 72 years old – United Freedom Front – Imprisoned for 38 yearsRomaine “Chip” Fitzgerald – 71 years old – Black Panther Party – Imprisoned for 50 yearsMumia Abu-Jamal – 72 years old – Black Panther Party, friend of MOVE Organization – Imprisoned for 39 yearsAlvaro Luna Hernández (Xinatchli) – 69 years old – Chicano movement activist – Imprisoned for 24 yearsKojo Bomani Sababu – 68 years old – Black Liberation Army – Imprisoned for 39 yearsPete O’Neal – 81 years old – Black Panther Party – Exiled in Tanzania for 50 yearsAssata Shakur – 73 years old – Black Liberation Army – Exiled in Cuba for 41 years after 6 years of U.S. imprisonmentBill Dunne – 68 years old – ABCF Prisoner Committee – Imprisoned for 41 yearsMutulu Shakur – 70 years old – Black Liberation Army – Imprisoned for 39 yearsHanif Shabazz Bey – 71 years old – Virgin Islands independence fighter – Imprisoned for 47 yearsRussell Maroon Shoats – 78 years old – Black Panther Party – Black Liberation Army – Imprisoned for 48 yearsLeonard Peltier – 77 years old – American Indian Movement, Turtle Mountain Chippewa – Imprisoned for 43 yearsImam Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin – 78 years old – Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, Black Panther Party, Dar ul-Islam Movement – Imprisoned for 20 yearsMeral (Malik) Smith – 71 years old – Virgin Islands independence fighter – Imprisoned for 47 yearsDavid Gilbert – 77 years old – Students for a Democratic Society – Weather Underground – Imprisoned for 39 yearsKenny Zulu Whitmore – 67 years old – Black Panther Party – Imprisoned for 45 yearsEd Poindexter – 77 years old – Black Panther Party – Imprisoned for 50 yearsLarry Hoover – 71 years old – Gangster Disciples – Imprisoned for 47 yearsFred Muhammad Burton – 75 years old – Philadelphia freedom fighter – Imprisoned for 48 yearsFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Hundreds rally, march against racist violence

Hundreds rally, march against racist violence

first_imgCleveland, March 28.Hundreds of Clevelanders from the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, along with multinational allies, rallied in the Asia Town neighborhood March 28. Sponsors of the “Stop Asian hate” rally were the Cleveland chapter of the Organization of Chinese Americans, Ohio Progressive Asian Women’s Leadership, Asian Services in Action, Asian Pacific Islander Public Affairs and Asia Town Cleveland.The rally was one of dozens held across the U.S. the weekend of March 27-28, some called by community groups and many by the Answer coalition, demanding an end to racially motivated attacks targeting Asians, Asian Americans and Pacific IslandersSpeakers, who addressed the crowd in Mandarin, Cantonese and English, represented the sponsoring organizations as well as the InterReligious Task Force on Central America, the arts collective Shooting Without Bullets, and City Council Ward 7 which includes Asia Town. Dr. Shemariah J. Arki of the Ellipsis Institute for Women of Color in the Academy led everyone in Assata Shakur’s chant: “We are determined to fight for our freedom. We are determined to win. We must love and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains.” A march through Asia Town followed the rally. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Seed Consultants Market Watch 1-2-13 PM Comments With Gary Wilhelmi

Seed Consultants Market Watch 1-2-13 PM Comments With Gary Wilhelmi

first_img Seed Consultants Market Watch 1-2-13 PM Comments With Gary Wilhelmi SHARE Home Market Market Watch Seed Consultants Market Watch 1-2-13 PM Comments With Gary Wilhelmi By Andy Eubank – Jan 2, 2013 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleStutzman Votes No on Cliff BillNext articleTuholski’s Take Part in Soybean Young Leader Program Andy Eubank FinancialDow closes up 308 on a late short covering wave that was positioned about mid day on the expectation of a finishing set backThe equity markets are in dangerously over extended posture so be carefulOur fiscal problems have only been addressed on a superficial levelSpending cuts, sequester issues, entitlements and the debt ceiling are still aheadIntense volatility is ever presentLivestockCash cattle are offered at $130Feb futures are already $6 over $127 cash from last weekFeb resistance is at about $134.50Feb hogs bounced slightly on short covering with support at $84Routine weekend meat features appear tomorrowGrain and soybeansThe equity market rally was not followed by the grain and soybean marketsMarch corn at $6.91 and March wheat at $7.58 came to rest on supportMarch soybean support is close at hand at $13.80 after at $13.92 closeThe current negative trend remains in effectWheat exports were good last week at 1 MT, so watch this weeks reportKansaswheat is rated 24% good to excellent and 31% poor top very poor, we have had some snow but not nearly enoughThe dollar firmed through the day but remains well within its rangeFarm bill extension is just a nine month band aid, and does not address key dairy issues$1 tax credit on biodiesel products helped soy oil but not other elements of the complexlast_img read more

Indiana Crops Continue Improvment

Indiana Crops Continue Improvment

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Crops Continue Improvment Indiana Crops Continue Improvment Previous articleNCGA’s Woodall Expects Farm Bill ExtensionNext articleUS Crop Condition Remains Solid Gary Truitt SHARE By Gary Truitt – Jul 8, 2013 Rain showers, across most of the state, kept wheatharvest to a minimum during the week, according to theIndiana Field Office of USDA’s National AgriculturalStatistics Service. Producers are worried thatexcessive moisture will soon begin to take its toll on thewinter wheat crop if they are not able to finish harvestsoon. Farmers are hoping for drier conditions to notonly finish wheat harvest but to also bale straw andplant double crop soybeans. Moderate temperaturesand ample soil moisture allowed the corn crop to makerapid growth with a few scattered fields beginning totassel.There were 2.8 days suitable for field work during theweek. Corn condition improved slightly and is rated81 percent good to excellent compared with 12 percentlast year at this time.Ninety-eight percent of the soybean acreage hasemerged compared with 100 percent last year and 97percent for the 5-year average. Nine percent of thesoybean acreage is blooming compared with 42percent last year and 20 percent for the 5-yearaverage. Soybean condition is rated 75 percent goodto excellent compared with 14 percent last year at thistime.Thirty-two percent of the winter wheat acreage hasbeen harvested compared with 98 percent last yearand 69 percent for the 5-year average. Winter wheatcondition is rated 76 percent good to excellent at thistime.LIVESTOCK, PASTURE AND RANGE REPORTLivestock remained in mostly good condition.Pasture condition improved and is rated 84 percentgood to excellent compared with only 2 percent lastyear at this time. The second cutting of alfalfa is 19percent complete compared with 93 percent last yearand 43 percent for the 5-year average. SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

New National FFA Officer Team Selected

New National FFA Officer Team Selected

first_img SHARE SHARE Students from Georgia, Arkansas, Colorado, Tennessee, Kentucky and New Mexico have been elected by delegates from throughout the United States to serve on the 2014-15 National FFA Officer team.National FFA President: Andy Paul of Georgia, an agricultural education major at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, was elected president.National FFA Secretary: Victoria Maloch of Arkansas, an agricultural business and pre-law major at University of Arkansas, will serve as secretary.National FFA Central Region Vice President:Kristen Schmidt of Colorado, an animal science and agricultural business major at Colorado State University, was elected central region vice president.National FFA Southern Region Vice President: Stephen McBride of Tennessee, an agricultural business major at University of Tennessee at Martin, will serve as southern region vice president.National FFA Eastern Region Vice President: Ruth Ann Myers of Kentucky, an agricultural education major at University of Kentucky, was elected eastern region vice president.National FFA Western Region Vice President: Caleb Gustin of New Mexico, an agricultural business and agricultural economics major at New Mexico State University, will serve as western region vice president.Each year at the National FFA Convention & Expo, six students are elected by delegates to represent the organization as National FFA officers. Delegates elect a president, secretary and vice presidents representing the central, southern, eastern and western regions of the country.National officers commit to a year of service to the National FFA Organization. Each travels more than 100,000 national and international miles to interact with business and industry leaders, thousands of FFA members and teachers, corporate sponsors, government and education officials, state FFA leaders, the general public and more. The team will lead personal growth and leadership training conferences for FFA members throughout the country and help set policies that will guide the future of FFA and promote agricultural literacy.The National FFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth and career success training through agricultural education to 610,240 student members in grades seven through 12 who belong to one of 7,665 local FFA chapters throughout the U.S., Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands.2014-15 National FFA Officer TeamNational FFA President: Andy Paul, GeorgiaNational FFA Secretary: Victoria Maloch, ArkansasNational FFA Central Region Vice President: Kristen Schmidt, ColoradoNational FFA Southern Region Vice President: Stephen McBride, TennesseeNational FFA Eastern Region Vice President: Ruth Ann Myers, KentuckyNational FFA Western Region Vice President: Caleb Gustin, New Mexico Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News New National FFA Officer Team Selected By Gary Truitt – Nov 2, 2014 New National FFA Officer Team Selected Facebook Twitter Previous articleClosing CommentsNext articleSunday Outlook Gary Truittlast_img read more

What You Don’t Hear About Animal Care

What You Don’t Hear About Animal Care

first_img By Gary Truitt – Oct 26, 2014 What You Don’t Hear About Animal Care Here is a little experiment. Type the phrase “animal care dairy” into your favorite search engine.  Then open a second tab in your browser and type the phrase “animal cruelty dairy.”  Then compare the two lists of results. One will have links to articles about how dairy farmers are caring for their animals and how animal care is a top priority for most producers. The other list will be filled with links to radical animal rights groups claiming that dairy farmers abuse their animals regularly and that the animals live in horrible conditions.  Rarely do the animal rights groups talk about animal care; their focus is on abuse because that is a more effective fundraising tool. Dairy farmers focus more on care and rarely use the term abuse because the term and the concept are so abhorrent to them. On my query there were 4,140,000 results on the animal cruelty page and 12,200,000 on the animal care page.  This would indicate that there are a lot more people talking about animal care than animal cruelty.  SHARE SHARE Facebook Twitter But dairy farmers are doing more than just talking about animal care. A recent report indicated that the majority are practicing animal care every day on their farms.  Dairy farmers nationwide continue to demonstrate widespread adoption of industry standards that assure high-quality care for their animals, according to a report released last week by the National Milk Producers Federation. The summary report, issued annually, quantifies practices by farmers participating in the industry’s responsible care program, known as the National Dairy FARM Program (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management). The report quantifies the results of more than 12,000 dairy farm evaluations conducted during the previous three years. All the data collected by second-party evaluators who visit each of those farms is catalogued and provides a baseline of the breadth of adoption of the program’s care practices. The report found nearly 95 percent of farms enrolled in the program train their employees to properly move animals that cannot walk and more than 98 percent train employees to handle calves with a minimum of stress. Animal rights groups assert that animal abuse occurs regularly on most farms, but the evidence does not support that allegation.  Overall, according to the report, participation in the FARM Program increased to more than three-quarters of the nation’s milk supply, up five percentage points from the previous year. In addition, 99 percent of farms observe animals daily to identify health issues for early treatment; 93 percent develop protocols with veterinarians for dealing with common diseases, calving, and animals with special needs; and 92 percent train workers to recognize the need for animals to be euthanized.center_img Another myth being perpetrated by critics of animal agriculture is that livestock farmers regularly pump animals full of antibiotics.  Yet, the fact is that responsible drug use by farmers is advocated and practiced by the majority of operations.  NMPF released the new 2015 edition of its safe use manual for antibiotics and other animal drugs. The Milk and Dairy Beef Drug Residue Prevention Manual permits producers to quickly review those antibiotics approved for use with dairy animals. It can also be used to educate farm managers in how to avoid drug residues in milk and meat. The manual, available online, is updated annually. “Today, the use of antibiotics and other drugs in livestock is more intently scrutinized than ever,” said Jamie Jonker, NMPF’s vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs. “To maintain consumer confidence, we must show we are using these medicines properly, legally, and judiciously. This manual shows dairy farmers’ commitment to just that.” Facebook Twitter Home Commentary What You Don’t Hear About Animal Care Previous articleBig Slow Harvest Causing ProblemsNext articleSunday Outlook Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt The shrill cries of animal cruelty have given consumers an unrealistic view of animal agriculture. While there are, and will continue to be, isolated cases of abuse on farms, the evidence is that most farms treat their animals with care, compassion, and best management practices.   If the retailers, who are so quick to put up signs in the dairy and meat case stating their these products are hormone free, would also put up signs that stated “produced by healthy and cared for animals,” consumers might begin to get a more complete and accurate picture of animal care on US farms.last_img read more

Bower Market Strategy Report: No Big Moves Likely Until the End…

Bower Market Strategy Report: No Big Moves Likely Until the End…

first_img Bower Market Strategy Report: No Big Moves Likely Until the End of the MonthJim BowerOver the past several weeks, the grain and oilseed market has been in a trading range. While prices have trended higher and lower, the market has not engaged in a breakout either to the upside or the down side.  With the planting intentions report set for release by the USDA at the end of March, Jim Bower sees  the market staying in this trading range for the next several weeks. “The market seems to want to hold,” he stated. “If you try and sell a put option, the market will not give you much of a premium.”In his weekly Market Strategy Report, aired on Hoosier Ag today radio stations around the state, Bower said the Federal Reserve action this past week has kept the value of the dollar lower which keeps the U.S. competitive from a currency standpoint and may help to stimulate U.S. grain exports.   Bower, however, sees the market becoming more volatile over the next two weeks, “This week will not be as quiet as last week. We are starting to see some field work being done and producers are finalizing production decisions.” He added that the market will begin to pay a lot more attention to weather maps, not only in the Midwest, but in the West where temperatures have been up and moisture short.Bower sees the biggest negative in the market right now is the large crop and excellent pace of harvest in South America, “They are a major competitor, and we just have to live with that.”For more information, contact Bower Trading at 1-800-533-8045.This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of Bower Trading Inc and is, or is in the nature of, a solicitation. This material is not a research report prepared by Bower Trading Inc. By accepting this communication, you agree that you are an experienced user of the futures markets, capable of making independent trading decisions, and agree that you are not, and will not, rely solely on this communication in making trading decisions.DISTRIBUTION IN SOME JURISDICTIONS MAY BE PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED BY LAW.  PERSONS IN POSSESSION OF THIS COMMUNICATION INDIRECTLY SHOULD INFORM THEMSELVES ABOUT AND OBSERVE ANY SUCH PROHIBITION OR RESTRICTIONS.  TO THE EXTENT THAT YOU HAVE RECEIVED THIS COMMUNICATION INDIRECTLY AND SOLICITATIONS ARE PROHIBITED IN YOUR JURISDICTION WITHOUT REGISTRATION, THE MARKET COMMENTARY IN THIS COMMUNICATION SHOULD NOT BE CONSIDERED A SOLICITATION.The risk of loss in trading futures and/or options is substantial and each investor and/or trader must consider whether this is a suitable investment. Past performance, whether actual or indicated by simulated historical tests of strategies, is not indicative of future results. Trading advice is based on information taken from trades and statistical services and other sources that Bower Trading Inc believes are reliable. We do not guarantee that such information is accurate or complete and it should not be relied upon as such. Trading advice reflects our good faith judgment at a specific time and is subject to change without notice. There is no guarantee that the advice we give will result in profitable trades. Bower Market Strategy Report: No Big Moves Likely Until the End of the Month Home Indiana Agriculture News Bower Market Strategy Report: No Big Moves Likely Until the End of… By Gary Truitt – Mar 19, 2017 SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articlePerdue Nomination Hearing This WeekNext articleAgriculture has a Communications Issue Gary Truittlast_img read more

Trump, Xi Now Unlikely to Meet Before March Deadline

Trump, Xi Now Unlikely to Meet Before March Deadline

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Trump, Xi Now Unlikely to Meet Before March Deadline Previous articleCTE Student Organizations, Including FFA, Recognized by General AssemblyNext articleLivestock Barn Zoning an Increasing Problem in Indiana NAFB News Service SHARE By NAFB News Service – Feb 7, 2019 Will they or won’t they? President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping now aren’t expected to meet later this month. Officials on both sides had said the two presidents were scheduled to be face-to-face later in February but now, CNBC says a meeting before the March 2nd deadline is unlikely. A senior administration official now says there’s “far too much work to do” in a short period of time before a deal can get done with China. President Trump had set a deadline of March 2nd to reach an agreement on trade.White House Trade Adviser Larry Kudlow tells Fox Business that Trump does expect to meet with Xi at some point in the future, but right now, it’s up in the air. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer is pressuring Beijing to make structural changes that would bring an end to policies that force U.S. companies to hand over technology or intellectual property as a requirement for doing businesses in the country. “The administration has argued that such policies are a direct attack on U.S. innovation and represent a deliberate campaign by China to take over dominance in the tech sector.The American Soybean Association says trade talks are good, soybean purchases are good, but lifting the tariff that China slapped on U.S. soybean imports would be better. The ASA says it’s the only way U.S. soybean producers can regain commercial access to China, their most significant overseas market. “It’s encouraging that the administration is keeping soybeans in their trade conversations with China,” says Davie Stephens, ASA President. “The Chinese Vice Premiere’s commitment to buy another five million tons of soybeans is encouraging, but it’s not the answer. We need an agreement at the end of the 90-day period that specifically rescinds the tariff that China has imposed on U.S. soybean imports.”The ASA president says the “good-faith” purchase commitment is a positive sign that both countries are working towards the real progress that soybean producers are looking for. However, the purchases don’t offset the damage done to the soybean industry since tariffs were imposed. It also doesn’t repair the long-term damage the tariffs have done to a relationship that was decades in the making. ASA is joining other organizations in asking congressional members to help strengthen their message to the Administration that rescinding the tariffs are vital to the health of the farm economy. Trump, Xi Now Unlikely to Meet Before March Deadline SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Vilsack: Dairy Consumption in U.S. On The Rise

Vilsack: Dairy Consumption in U.S. On The Rise

first_img SHARE Previous articleAg Programs Advance in AppropriationsNext articleCommodity Classic Registration Now Open Ashley Davenport By Ashley Davenport – Nov 13, 2019 SHARE Home Indiana Agriculture News Vilsack: Dairy Consumption in U.S. On The Rise Earlier this week, Dean Foods filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Sales dropped 7 percent in the first half of the year, profits fell 14 percent, and stock in Dean Foods lost 80 percent of its value.The nation’s oldest milk producer says its struggles stem from the fact that Americans aren’t drinking as much fluid milk from cows as they once were.At the National Association of Farm Broadcasters (NAFB) meeting in Kansas City, CEO of the U.S. Dairy Export Council and former agriculture secretary Tom Vilsack says 94 percent of U.S. households have milk in their refrigerators.“Which suggests a continuation of a healthy $100 billion industry,” said Vilsack. “You’re seeing higher levels of consumption of certain kinds of fluid milk, whole milk, flavored milk—perhaps a decline in 1 or 2 percent in low fat.”Vilsack also noted that the National Milk Producers Federation is making strides to improve milk at school, and remains adamant that milk consumption has been on the rise.“For the first time in a while, domestic consumption is actually equaled the production increases, which is good news,” he said. “The issue has been it hasn’t kept pace with the increase in production. We’ve been able to produce more than we’ve domestically consumed, which is why export markets became important.” Facebook Twitter Vilsack: Dairy Consumption in U.S. On The Rise Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Panthers aim to carry momentum second time through district

Panthers aim to carry momentum second time through district

first_imgAbortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature ReddIt Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students printThe Paschal Panthers’ thrilling walk-off victory against Arlington Tuesday evening showed coach Darrell Preston just how well his team can play when his players support each other.“They were doing it for each other and pulling for one another,” said Preston. “I think we had all 19 guys contribute in some way during that win.”The win vaulted the Panthers into the playoff picture. Preston said it was a huge win, but he would like to create some distance between his team and their pursuers in the standings.As the second time through the division begins Friday evening, Paschal (8-7, 5-2 Dist. 4-6A) is one game out of first place. The team will try to extend its two-game win streak as it hosts the North Crowley Panthers (11-5, 4-3).“North Crowley got us already once,” said Preston. “We have to come prepared and ready to give them a game.”The first time they met, North Crowley outdueled Paschal to a 3-2 win. But which North Crowley offense will show up Friday evening? Last Thursday the team scored 20 runs against Arlington Sam Houston, but the next game the Panthers were shut out by Arlington Martin.Coach Preston said he plans to work on defense this week after his team made three errors in Tuesday’s game.“I think both teams had about 10 different ways they could have lost that game,” said Preston. “We preach just to make the routine plays and if you do that then you win ball games.”Junior Drew Medford is the probable starting pitcher for Friday. Medford played catcher in Tuesday’s win and finished 5-for-6 with two doubles and four RBIs. He also picked off a runner at first to end a threat in the eighth inning.“When he’s behind the plate, I leave it up to him,” said Preston. “He is so accurate with his throws that you hardly ever see one go awry.”Arlington Martin and Arlington Lamar also play each other Friday evening. The winner will stay in first place while the loser will fall a game behind. Paschal will need a win in order to keep pace with the district lead. First pitch is slated for 7 p.m. in Fort Worth. Twitter Facebook Previous articlePaschal softball aiming high against lowly TexansNext articleArtists relish opportunity at Main St. The 109 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Stories from the polls: Election Day in The109! The 109 Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Linkedin ReddIt Twitter The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ + posts Facebook The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Linkedin The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students Fort Worth braces for more severe weather The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/last_img read more