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What we’re reading: Kavanaugh, Kavanuagh, and more Kavanaugh

What we’re reading: Kavanaugh, Kavanuagh, and more Kavanaugh

first_img Previous articleListen: Frogflix: Episode 4Next articleThe race for the U.S. Senate has voters on close watch Mariana Rivas RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Mariana Rivashttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mariana-rivas/ Horoscope: November 15, 2019 Facebook ReddIt + posts What we’re reading: Chauvin found guilty in Floyd case, Xi to attend Biden’s climate change summit Horoscope: November 14, 2019 Twitter Horoscope: November 13, 2019 What we’re reading: Former Vice President dies at 93, Chad President killed on frontlines Linkedin ReddItcenter_img Mariana Rivas Mariana Rivashttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mariana-rivas/ printWe’re back and we’re reading – everything from the “New York Times” to the “Wall Street Journal.” We’re trying to help you keep up with the rapid pace of politics and policy. Today we’ve got yet another update on Kavanaugh, U.S. sanctions on a Turkish company, and those Russians again.Senate votes to advance Kavanaugh’s nominationJudge Brett M. Kavanaugh secured the support needed to win Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court.The Senate voted Friday 51 to 49 to advance Kavanaugh’s nomination.Three of the four undecided votes went to Kavanaugh’s favor coming from two Republicans, Sens. Jeff Flake (Ariz.) and Susan Collins (Maine), and one Democrat, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska).After reading the FBI report Thursday, both Republican senators said they’d “seen no additional corroborating information” to go along with Dr. Ford’s testimony.Just when we thought it was over, some votes could still change later on Friday.Kavanaugh acknowledges demeanor in Senate testimonySupreme court nominee Brett Kavanaugh acknowledged that he shouldn’t have said some things in his testimony to the Senate in an op-ed published Thursday.Kavanaugh said he understands how questions about his demeanor and judicial temperament could be raised after the way he acted. But he argues that he will be an impartial and even-tempered justice.According to the Washington Post, his defense comes after 2,400 law professors from different political parties signed a letter to the Senate that argued for Kavanaugh’s lack of “judicial temperament.”Kavanaugh wanted to it make clear that the allegations against him were undue and wrongful.But some like Senator Chris Murphy (D-CT) said it was too little too late to make a statement.What the Kavanaugh allegations mean for the midtermsRepublicans never expected the backlash and controversy that surrounded Kavanaugh’s nomination on July 9.What seemed like a sure thing confirmation is now making the party nervous. But something else surprising has happened in light of all of this: Republicans are more excited to vote in the midterms.A NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll said Republicans decreased their enthusiasm deficit from 10 to 2 points since July.According to CNN, republican leaders have noticed this spurt of enthusiasm and are using it to ensure the maximum amount of voters show up to the polls on Nov. 6.Trump tax investigation continuesNew York City officials said Thursday they have joined state regulators in the investigation of the Trump family tax schemes.Earlier this week, it was revealed that Trump had participated in shady things like outright fraud and tax evasion in the 1990s.The statute of limitation on any of these potential crimes uncovered have long expired, but this investigation will decide whether other penalties like fines are merited.U.S. puts sanctions on Turkish companyThe U.S. government imposed sanctions on a Turkish company for doing business with North Korea.S.I.A. Falcon International Group was accused of trading luxury goods and weapons with North Korea and ignoring previous sanctions from the U.S. and the United Nations.This is sending a strong message to Kim Jong Un right before the Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s visit to North Korea this weekend.The Trump administration wants to make clear its intentions to put pressure on North Korea to get rid of its nuclear missile programs.The move is also highlighting the on-again off-again relationship with Turkey, a NATO country.U.S. officials charge Russian spy agency of attacksThe U.S. government charged seven Russian spies with a variety of crimes.From widespread hacking that leaves no one safe to doping, poisoning, and downing of a plane, these individuals aren’t getting off easy.Russian officials from the intelligence agency, GRU, have denied these active measures and said that the U.S. has some shady business of its own: a biological program using toxic bugs as weapons.This is just one instance of the many accounts of Russian international crimes. Who knows where they’ll go next?That’s all we have for today. Check back Monday for more. Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Twitter Linkedin Facebook Mariana Rivas is a junior journalism major at TCU. A native of Caracas, Venezuela, she grew up in Houston, Texas. You can usually find her drinking coffee, hanging out with friends or writing about anything she is passionate about! Mariana Rivashttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mariana-rivas/ Mariana Rivashttps://www.tcu360.com/author/mariana-rivas/ Venezuelan migrant families manage struggles for citizenship in Colombialast_img read more

Tropical wave has 80% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone

Tropical wave has 80% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone

first_img 10 Views   no discussions NewsRegional Tropical wave has 80% chance of becoming a tropical cyclone by: – July 27, 2011 Tweet Share Sharing is caring!center_img Share Share A tropical wave near the Yucatan Channel has a 80 percent chance of developing into a tropical cyclone within 48 hours, the National Hurricane Center said.“A tropical depression could develop later today” as it moves west-northwest near 15 miles per hour, the National Hurricane Centre said this morning in an advisory at 7:48 a.m. Barbados time.“Interests in the northeastern Yucatan peninsula as well as the central and western Gulf of Mexico should monitor the progress of this system,” it said.An air force reserved hurricane hunter aircraft is scheduled to investigate the system later today.Caribbean 360 Newslast_img read more

Angels acquire reliever Kyle Keller from Marlins

Angels acquire reliever Kyle Keller from Marlins

first_imgIn order to create a spot on the 40-man roster for Keller, the Angels designated right-hander Jake Jewell for assignment.Estrada, 19, had played one season with the Angels’ Dominican Summer League team. He hit .247 with a .640 OPS in 43 games.ALSORyan Garko was hired to be the Angels’ major-league coaching assistant. Garko had spent the past two seasons as the coach at University of the Pacific. Garko also played parts of six seasons in the majors, with the Cleveland Indians, Giants and Texas Rangers.Related Articles Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone The Angels picked up right-handed reliever Kyle Keller from the Miami Marlins on Monday, sending minor league catcher José Estrada to the Marlins.Keller, 26, had pitched in just 10 big-league games with the Marlins, striking out 11 and walking eight in 10-2/3 innings. He had allowed four earned runs.Through his minor league career, Keller had a 3.53 ERA over five seasons, with 12 strikeouts per nine innings.Keller was the Marlins’ 18th-round pick in the 2015 draft. The Marlins had designated Keller for assignment before the trade. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter center_img Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros last_img read more

Portland State freshman Taylor shoots for Big Sky Monday

Portland State freshman Taylor shoots for Big Sky Monday

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsNelson’s Lauren Taylor hopes to build on what has already been an amazing season on the links at Portland State when the Vikings begin play Monday in the Big Sky Conference at the Ocotillo Golf Resort in Chandler, AZ.Taylor joins Viking teammates junior Tiffany Schoning, sophomore Britney Yada, senior Kalyn Dodge and senior Alexia Brown at the 54-hole championship tournament.The winner of the tournament advances to an NCAA Regional on May 5-7, likely the West Regional at Washington National Golf Club in Auburn, WA.”We have a game plan for the golf course and must commit to that and play one shot at a time,” said Portland State head Coach Kathleen Takaishi on the university website.”The team is confident going into the week, but knows it has to execute once again.”Taylor, 19, already won two tournaments this season on the Big Sky circuit in California — Cal State Fullerton Folino Invitational and UC Irvine Anteater Invitational.Those accomplishments did not go unnoticed as the Granite Pointe golfer last week earned Big Sky Conference Freshman of the Year accolades — the first freshman from Portland State to claim the honour.Taylor, a graduate of L.V. Rogers High School, also was named to the All- Big Sky Conference Team with Schoning and Yada. Dodge was named to the second team.All-Conference honors are based on Golfstat.com national player rankings.Taylor’s scoring average of 75.80 is the best ever by a PSU freshman. She also tied a school scoring record for a 36-hole tournament with an even par 144 at the Folino. Taylor, a former star on the West Kootenay and B.C. Junior Golf circuit, is a two-time Big Sky Conference Golfer of the Week.The Big Sky Conference tournament starts Monday and runs through Wednesday with 18 holes of play each day at Ocotillo Golf Resort in Chandler, AZ, a par-72, 6,162-yard course. Portland State won the 2010 Big Sky Conference Championship by two strokes over Sacramento [email protected]last_img read more

UCLA’s Drew deflects defenders and the credit

UCLA’s Drew deflects defenders and the credit

first_img UCLA is 5-0. Hail Maurice Drew. “I could care less (about scoring),” Drew said. “As long as we win, I’m satisfied. I wish someone else was scoring.” Coach Karl Dorrell is looking for ways to get him the ball more, so he can keep scoring. He’s thinking about making using him as a receiver. Why not? Down by five points, UCLA had a third-and-1 scenario at Cal’s 28. The call was for a pass in the flat to Drew, something they usually run in goal-line situations. Drew got the first down, avoided a tackle at his feet and hurdled a defender at the goal-line to score a 28-yard touchdown with 1:35 left. “He’s a joy to watch,” UCLA linebacker Justin London said. “He’s 100 percent heart. You know if you give him the opportunity, he’s doing something.” Drew had 299 all-purpose yards Saturday. He equaled his five-touchdown performance he set against Washington last year. He ran for 65 yards and scored rushing touchdowns of 12, 1 and 2 yards. He had two receptions for 52 yards and a score. He returned three punts for 162 yards, including a score. And there was one kickoff return for 20 yards. But who’s counting? Drew can score every which way and he did. On his first score, a 12-yard run, he met safety Harrison Smith who’s six inches taller at the goal-line. He ran him over, then stood there and bantered with. And how special that the biggest win of Drew’s career came against Cal. Drew is from Northern California, prepped at Concord De La Salle and pondered Cal before he chose UCLA. He played with and against so many of Cal’s players and consoled many after the game. “It was a little personal,” Drew said. ” I didn’t want to lose after we fought (like that).” 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Photo Gallery:UCLA vs Cal He deflects star treatment so much that he apologized to teammates for getting tackled on one punt return with one man to beat and told reporters they should be talking to his blockers on special teams, not him. PASADENA Maurice Drew might be the only soul in Los Angeles who doesn’t realize he’s special. Drew has yet to take credit for any of his three punt returns for touchdowns this season, including the 81-yard gem against Cal on Saturday. center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 He shouldered the blame for the lack of a running game the last couple of weeks, even though he was getting hit in the backfield. That’s part of Drew’s charm. His five touchdown-performance, which tied his own school record, against 10th-ranked Cal was just an added bonus. His 299 all-purpose yards must have been the work of his teammates. UCLA beat Cal 47-40 at the Rose Bowl and Drew, according to him, did nothing out of the ordinary. “I’m just running the ball,” Drew said. “That’s easy.” Every time UCLA seemed ready to fold against the Bears, Drew did something special. Hence, so did UCLA. The Bruins rallied from 12-point fourth quarter deficit to knock off the 10th-ranked team in the country. last_img read more

SIMPLY RED STAR HUCKNALL TAKES DONEGAL ESTATE BATTLE TO COURT

SIMPLY RED STAR HUCKNALL TAKES DONEGAL ESTATE BATTLE TO COURT

first_imgSIMPLY RED musicians Mick Hucknall and Christopher De Margary ongoing dispute with a neighbour over fishing and shooting rights on adjoining estates in County Donegal will be heard in court today.Lead singer Hucknall and sax player De Margary are due in Letterkenny Circuit Court in the dispute with their neighbour John Wilde.They claim he has interfered with their rights and those of their guests on the Glenmore Estate at Welchtown, Ballybofey. Mr Wilde retains links to a neighbouring estate across the river Finn at Cloghan Lodge, where he still lives, although he sold it some years ago.Hucknall and De Margary, who are keen anglers, are claiming that since they purchased the fishing, shooting and “hereditaments” rights for €1.3 million at Glenmore on August 5th, 2005, Mr Wilde had interfered with their “quiet enjoyment” of those rights.They said Mr Wilde had also laid claim to the ownership of the rights on Glenmore.Mr Wilde however claims the previous owner of Glenmore, John Mackie, transferred the fishing and shooting rights to his father.The musicians were refused an injunction preventing alleged continued encroachment at the same court four years ago.All eyes will be on Letterkenny court house today as two legal heavyweights begin setting out the case for their clients.Damian Crawford will represent Mr Wilde, while Peter Nolan will represent the world famous musicians.The chart-topping stars acquired some rights to the River Finn outside Ballybofey in 2006 after they bought the Glenmore Rivers estate.Both are keen anglers and saxophonist De Margey even set up home on the estate.Hucknall, 56, often stays on the 24,000 acre Co Donegal estate where he is popular with locals.SIMPLY RED STAR HUCKNALL TAKES DONEGAL ESTATE BATTLE TO COURT was last modified: March 24th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Christopher De MargarydonegalJohn WildeJUdge John O’HaganLetterkenny Circuit CourtMick HucknallSimply Redlast_img read more

Tibetans Evolved Altitude Tolerance in 3,000 Years

Tibetans Evolved Altitude Tolerance in 3,000 Years

first_imgTibetans and other peoples who live at high altitudes possess a remarkable tolerance to the thin atmosphere.  Now, scientists at UC Berkeley have identified some 30 genes related to oxygen regulation that differ in Tibetans from Han Chinese.  Since those tribes are thought to have diverged 3,000 years ago, natural selection for these changes must have occurred in that time.    PhysOrg reported the findings that were published in two papers in Science.1,2    According to Rasmus Nielsen, lead author of one of the studies, “You look for rapid evolution in genes because there must be something important about that gene forcing it to change so fast.”  That’s why they were keen to find genetic differences between the 50 Tibetans and 40 Han Chinese whose genomes they compared.  Surprisingly, Nielsen said that “The new finding is really the first time evolutionary information alone has helped us pinpoint an important function of a gene in humans.”  The way evolutionists talk about their theory as the key to biology, one would think thousands of studies would have preceded this one.    New Scientist called this a “remarkable” case of adaptation at “a record-breaking rate.”  They quoted Nielsen calling it “the fastest genetic change ever observed in humans.”  Still, it is not clear what evolution was doing.  The genetic differences do not result in a different blood concentration of hemoglobin, the protein that carries oxygen to the tissues, from the values for people living at sea level.  Jay Storz [U of Nebraska], commenting on the papers in the same issue of Science,3 spoke of the mutations as representing possible “candidate” targets of selection, but that the functional significance of the changes has not yet been established:In the case of hemoglobin concentration in Tibetans, for example, selection has not favored a trait value outside the ancestral range of variation.  Instead, selection appears to have favored a blunted erythropoietic response such that hemoglobin concentration at high altitude is maintained at the sea-level status quo.  Although the mechanism has yet to be elucidated, it appears that regulatory changes in EPAS1 and other HIF-related genes have recalibrated the set point for hypoxia-induced erythropoiesis in Tibetans.  Andean highlanders have not evolved a similar mechanism for attenuating the erythropoietic response to hypoxia, possibly because of their shorter history of residence at high altitude.    It remains to be seen whether hemoglobin concentration represents the direct phenotypic target of selection in Tibetans, or whether changes in hemoglobin concentration represent an ancillary effect of selection on some other physiological trait that is altered by regulatory changes in the HIF cascade.  These studies of Tibetan highlanders provide compelling proof of principle that the integration of population genomics and association studies can successfully identify targets of recent positive selection.The authors of the two primary papers similarly spoke of “putatively advantageous genes” but did not establish actual functional advantages they confer on Tibetans living in oxygen-poor, high-altitude environments.  Storz thus raised two questions: (1) are the genetic changes related to Tibetans’ altitude tolerance, or just ancillary effects of selection for other traits?  Neutral genetic drift should be ruled out.  (2) If these changes are functional in Tibetans, how do the Andeans tolerate high altitudes without similar genetic changes?    It should be noted that it’s difficult to identify genes under selection pressure.  Scientists sometimes assume that changes are targets of selection without checking to see if those changes produce functional advantages for the organism in its environment.  Last year, three researchers indicated that many studies for “positive selection” are based on flawed methods and statistics (03/30/2009).    A previous study did not link Tibetan altitude tolerance to genes for hemoglobin, but rather to nitric oxide levels (see 10/31/2007, bullet 4).  Furthermore, it appears that only regulatory changes to existing genes, not new genetic information, may be involved.  A more thorough study would compare comparable genes for other mammals, birds, and reptiles at high altitude with their sea-level counterparts, and see whether gradations exist for animals at mid-altitudes.  Before one can claim, therefore, that these studies represent “the first time evolutionary information alone has helped us pinpoint an important function of a gene in humans,” the researchers need to get beyond “proof of principle” and show whether natural selection accomplished anything at all.1.  Yi, Lyang et al, “Sequencing of 50 Human Exomes Reveals Adaptation to High Altitude,” Science, 2 July 2010: Vol. 329. no. 5987, pp. 75-78, DOI: 10.1126/science.1190371.2.  Simonson, Yang et al, “Genetic Evidence for High-Altitude Adaptation in Tibet,” Science, 2 July 2010: Vol. 329. no. 5987, pp. 72-75, DOI: 10.1126/science.1189406.3.  Jay F. Storz, “Evolution: Genes for High Altitudes,” Science, 2 July 2010: Vol. 329. no. 5987, pp. 40-41, DOI: 10.1126/science.1192481.Natural selection may be responsible for the changes, or it may not be.  Researchers assume that mutations are targets of selection.  Scientific rigor demands that those genetic changes actually be linked to adaptive changes.  Darwinian theory would require that the adaptations allow for survival of the fittest – i.e., that individuals lacking the mutations die out.  The study found that only 87% of the Tibetans had one of the leading candidate mutations.  How do the remaining 13% breathe and live up there?  And why did 9% of the Chinese have the mutation, if they were not under selection pressure by living at high altitude?  Furthermore, if this “fastest genetic change ever observed in humans” represents evolutionary progress, why don’t the people in the Andes have it?  How do they live and breathe at their high altitudes?  Responding that the lack of genetic changes is “possibly because of their shorter history of residence at high altitude” is a cop-out.  Evolution can be as fast as evolutionary biologists need it to be to fit their story.    Despite the hype in the headlines, there has been no demonstration of a Darwinian evolutionary adaptive change here.  But even if there were, creationists would have no problem accepting it.  Creationists accept natural selection operating within created kinds producing “horizontal” changes (i.e., adaptive changes that do not add any new genetic information).  The Tibetans are still interfertile with the Chinese, after all, and the time frame for the changes fits easily within a Biblical timeframe.    What evolutionists should be worried about is why some humans did not evolve altitude tolerance hundreds of thousands of years ago.  By now, shouldn’t there be a separate species, Homo everestus, the obligate mountain men?  According to Darwinian expectations of geographical isolation and allopatric speciation, such high-altitude humans should be unable to breed with sea people or even approach sea level without bursting their lungs.  This story looks more and more like a confirmation of the Biblical creation model for human history and origin by design (see the 06/17/2005 entry).(Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Extreme prices plaguing marketing decisions

Extreme prices plaguing marketing decisions

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grains this past month can be summed up in just one word, extremes. We have seen both price extremes and weather extremes. The uncertainty of weather has often yielded quick and violent price movement. All summer it has become apparent that we are in a season of extremes. That is not a short-term phenomenon. However, time is running out for weather to have much more impact in coming weeks.This summer it has been very common to see daily prices for corn and soybeans peak during the overnight trading session, only to reverse and move harshly in the opposite direction during the day session. It can make for some most frustrating thoughts as to pricing or not pricing 2016 corn and soybeans. One moment you are happy and a few hours later you are not. It quickly becomes, “cycle, rinse, repeat.”It was most interesting to observe the market mentality leading up to the USDA supply and demand report released on July 12.  Traders had expected the reports to be bearish. They had expected ending stocks for corn and soybeans to increase and prices to decline. While the reports did have corn and soybean ending stocks increasing, it was not to the extent expected. New crop corn ending stocks came out at 2.081 billion bushels. Looking several months down the road, some analysts think new crop corn ending stocks could eventually reach near the 2.5 billion bushel mark, especially if the U.S. corn yield increases. Some also expect demand for U.S. corn could falter in the months ahead. The bottom line is that it would seem traders forgot about weather and tried to place more significance upon the monthly USDA supply and demand report than it deserved.Corn exports increased due largely to less production from Brazil while corn used for ethanol declined. Brazil corn production was lowered 7.5 million tons. Likewise soybean-ending stocks for new crop soybeans did increase 30 million bushels to 290 million bushels. New crop soybean demand increased a total of 30 million bushels with both exports and crush increasing. When the report was not bearish for corn or soybeans, funds quickly returned to their pattern of buying soybeans. With the report not producing price declines, it gave those funds confidence to again turn to buying soybeans.At this reading we will know if temperatures reached near the 100-degree level in the Midwest the last 10 days of July. Mid-July some of the weather forecasts had expected a ridge pattern to develop in the Midwest and southern plains areas. That weather pattern brings excitement to traders as it can bring high temperature extremes for days while often preventing needed rains from taking place.Weather concerns can bring volatile price activity with wide ranges from highs to lows in a short period of time. The week of July 11 is a great example of this price pattern. November CBOT soybeans that week had a high of $11.23 and a low of $10.21. Prices were low early in the week, then peaked mid-week on weather concerns of hot and dry, only to close the week near $10.57 as prolonged ideas of hot weather vanished. The extreme price volatility has not gone unnoticed by the CBOT. While traders love price volatility and huge price ranges along with the potential for gains, it does have a money management downside. Soybean margins have more than doubled since early April. Unforeseen weather and additional demand have pushed November CBOT soybeans from $9.10 on March 31 to $11.86 on June 13.The Aug. 12 USDA supply and demand report will be the first actual survey of U.S. corn and soybean fields for yield determinations. Without additional weather concerns for corn the U.S. yield could easily climb above 168 bushels. Without additional demand corn will have difficultly moving past $4.10 in coming months.last_img read more

Celebrate Amazing Geocachers

Celebrate Amazing Geocachers

first_img SharePrint RelatedSeptember Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentOctober 2, 2013In “Community”Announcing the April Featured Geocacher of the MonthMay 25, 2012In “Community”November Featured Geocacher of the Month Nominees – Add Your CommentsNovember 8, 2011In “Community” Each month, geocachers nominate the person they think is the ultimate community-minded geocacher for the ultimate geocaching community award: Geocacher of the Month. Nominees range from incredible event hosts, those who introduced new geocachers to the game, and geocache makers whose out-of-this-world inventions inspire others to think outside the plastic container.We’ll peruse the nominations and choose three geocachers as finalists. From there, the community takes the reins and votes in the form of comments on the blog post. Each of the finalists receives a gift pack from Geocaching HQ, plus a virtual high-five from the entire geocaching community.Vote for this month’s Geocacher of the Month hereDo you know someone who deserves the honor of being Geocacher of the Month? Nominate them!(Hier kannst Du den Artikel auf deutsch lesen)Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

12 of the World’s Spookiest Caches

12 of the World’s Spookiest Caches

first_img SharePrint Related12 Geocaches Guaranteed to Give You GoosebumpsOctober 26, 2015In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter”It’s the Spookiest Time of Year — Manunka Chunk Tunnels (GC82B5) — Geocache of the WeekOctober 23, 2013In “Community”Tips for a Spooky Geocaching HalloweenOctober 27, 2014In “Geocaching Weekly Newsletter” Loading… Share with your Friends:Morelast_img