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Fernandes hits back at critics after QPR victory

Fernandes hits back at critics after QPR victory

first_imgCo-chairman Tony Fernandes again responded to a QPR victory by posting on Twitter to hit back at his critics. Rangers enjoyed a marvelous 4-1 win at Birmingham – and Fernandes enjoyed telling his doubters he believed it proved things are heading in the right direction under Ian Holloway.It’s a nice feeling. Ecstatic Wish I could see some of those people who email me giving me abuse. Thank you Ian and the boys.— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) February 18, 2017Stuck to our guns. Get the right sort. Resign the right sort. Let go of those who didnt care. Bring in some blue blooded academy young ones— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) February 18, 2017And a passionate manager and backroom. Thrilled to see all strikers getting in on the action. Happy chairman. Long long way to go— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) February 18, 2017See also:Holloway ‘bursting with pride’ after QPR victory   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Growing the organic business

Growing the organic business

first_imgThe demand for organic fresh produce has increased across the world.Khanyi MagubaneEmerging farmers in Kwa-Zulu-Natal will soon be reaping the rewards of the growing worldwide demand for organic products. The South African government has signed an agreement with the Swiss company BioSwiss for the export of high-quality organic vegetables to the US, France and Britain.The eight-year memorandum of agreement with the Department of Agriculture and Land Affairs involves three land reform projects in Vryheid, KwaZulu-Natal. BioSwiss has invested R100-million (US$ 13.2-million) to develop a factory in the area.“We would like to expand this project to other regions of the province, once we see it successful in Vryheid,” says Gwelyn Owen, CEO of BioSwiss.BioSwiss will provide the communities involved in the project with financial backing and the technical skills for growing organic produce. They will also receive mentoring/training and business management, as they will have to deal with international clientele during the exporting process.The three land reform projects form part of the Department of Agriculture and Land Affair’s Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) project. This is a sub-programme of the land redistribution programme.LRAD has two distinct parts. Firstly, agricultural land is transferred to specific individuals or groups. Secondly, the programme deals with commonage projects, which aim to improve people’s access to municipal and tribal land primarily for agricultural purposes.The term municipal commonage is traditionally given to land owned by a municipality or local authority that was usually acquired through state grants or from the church. It differs from other municipally-owned land in that residents have acquired grazing rights on the land, or the land was granted expressly to benefit needy local inhabitants.What is organic farming?Organic farming avoids the use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, plant growth regulators, livestock feed additives and any other form of chemicals in the production process. Organic farmers rely on developing a healthy, fertile soil, and growing a mixture of crops. With respect to livestock, animals are reared without the routine of drugs and antibioticsAccording to the Soil Association, which promotes health and organic farming in England, more people are choosing to buy organic food because it tastes better, is safer from a health perspective and is environmentally friendly. Organic farming also requires that animals be kept in more natural, free-range conditions with a more natural diet.Organic AfricaIn South Africa, the organic farming industry is growing. From an estimated R5-million before 2003, sales of organic food grown in South Africa – domestic sales and exports combined – jumped to R155-million in 2005. This figure was expected to increase significantly in the 2006/2007 financial year.Organics South Africa, a non-profit organisation formed in 1994, engages with farmers, retailers and government. Its main aim is to “increase the awareness of sustainable farming methods and to assist in the recognition of the natural relationship between soil, plant, animal and mankind”.With its vast natural resources, Africa is quickly becoming the preferred supplier of organic foods. Three years ago, a report released by the Advocates’ Coalition for Development and Environment, an independent public policy, research and advocacy think tank, indicated that Uganda was the biggest exporter of organic products in Africa.According to the report, the number of organic farmers increased by 38%, from 28 000 in 2002 to 39 600 by the end of 2004. The report also indicates that Uganda has the largest area dedicated to organic farming (22 000 ha), making it the organic farming leader in Africa and the fourth largest in the world. Uganda’s climate and the fact that much of the land has been not been used for agriculture before makes Uganda ideal for organic farming.Useful LinksOrganic South AfricaSoil AssociationOrganic NewsAdvocates coalition for development and environmentDepartment of AgricultureDepartment of Land AffairsDo you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at [email protected]last_img read more

Let’s hear it for Booooth!

Let’s hear it for Booooth!

first_img22 June 2009 As anyone watching South Africa in action at the Fifa Confederations Cup has surely noticed, whenever the ball finds its way to towering Bafana Bafana defender Matthew Booth, an unusual cry goes up around the stands. To the uninitiated it might sound like the thousands of home fans are registering their displeasure at the Mamelodi Sundowns defender. After all, Booth would not be the first player to be on the receiving end of catcalls from his own fans. But as millions of spectators around the world discovered last week, the noise that greets his every intervention are not boos, but supporting cries of “Booooth!”. What was perplexing viewers even more was the fact that the man in question barely put a foot wrong in his side’s opening two games, prompting them to ask why fans would boo one of their own players when he was performing so well. It was a riddle that even South Africa coach Joel Santana had to ponder after he took over the job. “The first time I heard the shouts in the stadium, I just couldn’t understand what was going on,” the Brazilian said. “I was under the impression that the fans loved Matthew, but there they were seemingly booing him for no apparent reason.” But as the smiling Booth explained to Fifa.com, peculiar cries of encouragement are something of a tradition among football fans in the Rainbow Nation. “When Mark Fish played for Bafana Bafana, it was the same. The fans shouted ‘Fiiish! Fiiish!’, and it sounded like they were having a go at him. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve had to explain to foreigners that there’s nothing wrong, that people love me really.” And the dependable defender is not wrong, receiving the kind of adulation normally reserved for goalscorers and more creative players. “I think it’s got something to do with my commitment,” he continues. “The fans can see that I take games seriously. Or maybe it’s just because I look like a nice guy to them! I don’t know. You’d have to ask them.” A veteran of seven seasons in Russia before returning home, Booth is hoping to take part in his first Fifa World Cup finals next year. He came agonisingly close to making an appearance at Korea/Japan 2002, suffering a kee injury during a training session at the squad’s pre-tournament camp in Hong Kong just 10 days before the opening game. “That was very tough to take,” he recalls. “It was the only time I’ve ever had surgery in my career, and it wasn’t even that serious. It just came at the worst possible time. “That’s why I want to try and convince Joel Santana with my performances at the Confederations Cup and make sure of a place for 2010. It would mean so much to me.” Source: Fifa.comlast_img read more

Predicting Compassion Fatigue and Burnout in Practitioners

Predicting Compassion Fatigue and Burnout in Practitioners

first_imgBy Rachel Dorman, MS & Heidi Radunovich, PhDIn previous posts we have discussed the importance of mental health providers protecting their own well-being by being aware of risks associated with compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. Today we will continue our discussion by looking at factors that may put one at risk or protect one from both compassion fatigue and burnout.[Flickr, From Both Ends by gfpeck, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015Thompson, Amatea, and Thompson (2014) conducted an online survey to learn more about how gender, length of career, appraisal of working conditions, and personal resources relate to burnout and compassion fatigue among mental health counselors. The study consisted of 213 mental health or licensed professional counselors who completed a master’s degree in counseling, had been practicing for at least six months, and were working with clients 20 hours per week or more. Those practitioners who had positive working conditions, had worked in the field longer, and who used mindfulness were found to be less likely to experience compassion fatigue or burnout. However, maladaptive and emotion-focused coping were related to compassion fatigue and burnout. There did not appear to be a gender difference in report of burnout, but women were more likely to report compassion fatigue than men.[Flickr, Ur doing it wrong by me and the sysop, CC BY-ND 2.0] Retrieved on September 17, 2015The authors provide many recommendations for counselors and supervisors. They suggest that counselors who are working in a less supportive environment seek support from colleagues, work with their employers to try to improve working conditions, and do what they can to take care of themselves. Supervisors should be sensitive to the possibility of burnout and compassion fatigue among their supervisees, and should try to educate their supervisees on the nature of stress in the counseling relationship, as well as making sure that they are using effective coping strategies to deal with work stress. Finally, the researchers strongly encourage practitioners to explore positive coping strategies to offset the potential negative effects of job stress, such as using mindfulness. For more information on burnout and compassion fatigue check out our previous blogs: Self-care When Caring for Others or Self-care for the Military Family Advocate.References[1] Thompson, I., Amatea, E., & Thompson, E. (2014) Personal and contextual predictors of mental health counselors’ compassion fatigue and burnout. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 36(1), p. 58 – 77. ISSN: 1040-2861This post was written by Rachel Dorman, M.S. and Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

Have started accepting losses now, earlier I would just go mad: Virat Kohli

Have started accepting losses now, earlier I would just go mad: Virat Kohli

first_imgVirat Kohli, the fiery and feisty India captain, has admitted he has started to accept defeats only now and added that there was a time he would go mad everytime his team lost. Kohli made his international debut in 2008 and immediately grabbed attention for his passion and never-say-die attitude.Kohli played his first ODI for India in August 2008. Even as a 19-year-old, he stood out with his strong desire to win matches for India. It was not long before he started scoring hundreds in stiff chases. Often, he would be shattered when India could not cross the line in close contests.After taking over as India captain in all three formats from the cool and composed MS Dhoni, Kohli seems to have become a lot calmer on the field. Kohli believes in leading from the front and lets his bat do all the talking, anyway.Kohli admitted a change in his attitude in as many words. The Indian captain has well and truly come of age and understands victories and defeats are part of sports.Also read – Virat Kohli says he’s not in a frame of mind to prove himself in any country”I’ve started to accept losses only now, but earlier, I would just go mad [when I lost],” Kohli told GQ.Besides, Kohli is also a style icon for tens of thousands of young Indian men. His beard and hairstyle are a raging hit among the youth now but there was a time when Kohli was judged over his love for fashion.READ – Virat Kohli has improved since 2014, says James AndersonadvertisementHowever, Kohli was unperturbed and remained focused on doing what he loved most: that is playing cricket, scoring hundreds and helping Indian win games of cricket.”[When I started out], I was judged a lot. I would get constant feedback about my appearance. The perception was that a person like me would only be a flash in the pan,” Kohli said. “But the truth is if you work hard, the game will give back. The game doesn’t look at tattoos; it looks at commitment.”last_img read more