Tag: 娱乐地图

Baron Oil to acquire Singapore’s SundaGas

Baron Oil to acquire Singapore’s SundaGas

first_imgSundaGas’ main assets include the Chuditch offshore block in Timor-Leste, and the Telen block in offshore Indonesia Image: Baron Oil to acquire SundaGas. Photo: courtesy of rawpixel from Pixabay. UK-based oil and gas exploration and production company Baron Oil has agreed to acquire Singapore-based exploration & production company SundaGas.Under the terms of the agreement, Baron would acquire the entire issued share capital of SundaGas (Holdings).As part of the transaction, Baron will issue two of its shares to each SundaGas shareholder. In the combined company, Baron will hold a 33% stake and the rest will be owned by SundaGas. The combined company will be named as SundaGas PLC.SundaGas’s main assets to be acquired by Baron OilSundaGas’ two main assets, which will be acquired by Baron Oil, include the Chuditch offshore block in Timor-Leste, and the Telen block in offshore Indonesia.SundaGas Banda Unipessoal (SGB), a wholly-owned subsidiary of SundaGas, holds a 75% operated working interest in the Chuditch block.Located approximately 185km south of Timor-Leste, Chuditch PSC covers approximately 3,571km2, in water depths of 50-100 metres. The block contains the Chuditch-1 gas discovery, which was drilled by Shell in 1998 and encountered a 25m gas column.Under the agreement, Baron is entitled to be issued a stake of 33.33% in SundaGas (Timor-Leste Sahul) (SGTL), the holding company of SGB.Also, SundaGas Indonesia Telen owns 100% working interest in the Telen Production Sharing Contract (Telen PSC), offshore Indonesia. It contains the Hiu Marah drill-ready prospect.Baron executive chairman Malcolm Butler said: “The SundaGas team brings impressive management and technical expertise in south-east Asia and it makes sense for us to combine forces with them. The Chuditch production sharing contract has the potential to contain a substantial gas accumulation and is an asset of significant value.“This proposed transaction will be transformational for our shareholders and we look forward to reporting back on progress in due course.”The completion of the transaction is subject to several conditions including the execution of a detailed legally binding sale and purchase agreement (SPA).last_img read more

Bearing witness to Uganda

Bearing witness to Uganda

first_imgTim McCarthy saw “Witness Uganda” six times this year.The musical production, which had its world premiere at the American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) last spring and expects to hit Broadway next year, is based on Griffin Matthews’ trip to the African nation after his church kicked him out because he was gay. Matthews booked a one-way ticket to Uganda, where he began volunteering with an orphanage, and was quickly captivated by the desires of impoverished youths to obtain an education, which isn’t free in Uganda.So Matthews founded the Uganda Project, which provides tuition, medical, and housing assistance for students there. He never expected it would become the backdrop of a musical production.“I thought it was the worst idea ever!” he recalled.But Matthews’ partner and show co-creator, Matt Gould, began secretly recording his rants about the complexities of international aid work and set music them to music, “and that was really the start of ‘Witness Uganda,’” said Matthews, “which was originally a one-night benefit concert in New York in a rinky-dink theater, but it just kept going.”The show inspired McCarthy, a lecturer on history and literature and the program director of Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, to launch The A.R.T. of Human Rights, which “seeks to use the arts and humanities to explore the most pressing human-rights issues of our time,” he said.The yearlong series kicked off Tuesday night at Oberon with a discussion involving McCarthy, Matthews, Gould, Malika Zouhali-Worrall, co-director and producer of the documentary “Call Me Kuchu,” and John “Long Jones” Wambere, co-founder of Spectrum Uganda Initiatives and a participant in “Call Me Kuchu.”The film depicts the struggles of gay Ugandans, who are prosecuted and physically harmed for their sexuality. The movie centers on the life of activist David Kato, who was murdered in 2011.McCarthy pressed the panelists to address why they were moved to make art about difficult topics, and how they settled on the media of film and musical theater.Originally a journalist, Zouhali-Worrall said she was frustrated by the limitations of written reporting. “I wasn’t interested only in the news, I was interested in people’s gestures, their personalities, and who they were, their characteristics, and I think that’s something that film enables you to capture in a really special way,” she said.“I think the thing about musical theater is that it’s an angry art form,” said Gould. “At least for me it is, because I’m a little angry, and it lends itself well to taking individual moments and exploding them into mind-bending, loud, in-your-face, emotional songs. And I think a lot of times we mistake musical theater for being light and fluffy, and the truth of the matter is that the history of musical theater is steeped in writers who were writing about war and racism and love and art and these difficult subjects.”Working in Uganda is not only difficult for Matthews and Gould, but dangerous, too. Because of the show’s growing popularity, the duo recently returned to Uganda to inform their students they were gay — a risky decision, because it could call unwanted attention to the schoolchildren.“But we had to bring them into the conversation,” said Gould.Choosing to involve himself in “Call Me Kuchu” was also a perilous move for Wambere, who justified the risk, saying, “When you notice you’re being oppressed, you want to stand out and make your stand.”Now seeking asylum in the United States, Wambere has mixed emotions about leaving his home. His family is there, and his reach is limited from abroad. But his fight goes on.“The more I cry, the more I break,” he said. “But it does not help me to change the world.”The next event in the A.R.T. of Human Rights will take place on Oct. 20. Here is the full schedule of events.last_img read more

Spain braces for impact of economic ‘hibernation’ to fight virus

Spain braces for impact of economic ‘hibernation’ to fight virus

first_imgTopics : But in a country where nearly one in three workers was unemployed at the height of its economic crisis in 2013, and still had the eurozone’s second highest unemployment rate — 14 percent — after Greece, anxiety is mounting.Half of all Spaniards fear losing their job because of the outbreak, according to a recent survey published in the daily El Pais. Speaking after the cabinet approved the decision to impose the work ban, Budget Minister Maria Jesus Montero said this economic “hibernation” was needed to fight the pandemic which has so far claimed 7,340 lives in Spain.Spain’s main business lobby group, the CEOE, immediately warned of an “unprecedented impact on the Spanish economy”.The eurozone’s fourth-largest economy was already largely at a standstill due to the lockdown, with production in Spain’s car plants already halted for example. Spanish bank BBVA had already forecast the country’s economic output would drop by around 4.0 percent before this new measure, which should not lead to “big changes” in its economic outlook, said Nuno Fernandes, an economist at the IESE business school. Spain, already struggling with high unemployment and debt, is bracing for the impact of the government’s decision to put the country’s economy into “hibernation” to fight the spread of coronavirus.Grappling with Europe’s second-worst outbreak of the disease after Italy, the government on March 14 imposed a lockdown and on Sunday it went even further, banning all non-essential work for two weeks in the nation of around 47 million people.The measure targeted especially the construction and manufacturing sectors, such as Airbus which was forced to stop production in Spain.center_img Job loss fears Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez’s leftist government on Friday banned job dismissals during the pandemic, a step demanded by unions which warned that up to one million people risked losing their jobs.”If there are not revenues but there are expenses and we can’t fire… the only option left is to close,” the head of the country’s main business group, Antonio Garamedi, said Monday during a radio interview.The government had pledged up to 100 billion euros ($111 billion) for loan guarantees to businesses to cushion the economy from the damage caused by the pandemic.But the business lobby group predicts 300,000 jobs could be lost if the crisis lasts over a month, especially in hotels, travel agencies and the textile sector.”Spain is a country where, if economic activity stops, more jobs are destroyed than in other countries,” said Pedro Aznar of the ESADE business school.This is because nearly 30 percent of all workers have temporary contracts, the highest rate in Europe, especially in the key tourism sector, and a 2012 labor market reform made it easier and less expensive to fire workers, he added. ‘Fewer resources’ The tourism sector, which accounts for around 12 percent of Spain’s GDP, has been especially hard hit by the pandemic.The UN World Tourism Organization predicted Friday that international travel will likely fall by 20 to 30 percent this year due to the disease.The global recession, which the virus will spark will also hit car sales, more bad news for Spain, Europe’s second-biggest car producer after Germany.With companies stopping their activity, “tax revenues will be very bad and the government will have fewer resources while it will have more expenses,” Aznar said.He said this explains why Sanchez “insists so much” on a proposal made by Spain and eight other European Union member states that the bloc borrow money to finance the fight against coronavirus by issuing joint “coronabonds”, he added.Germany and the Netherlands have opposed the idea.Spain has much less margin to maneuver now than it did when the global finance crisis struck in 2008.The country’s public debt currently stands at over 95 percent of its economic output, compared with less than 37 percent in 2007.last_img read more

Athletes in Arms: Individuals should not be blamed for the mistakes of leaders

Athletes in Arms: Individuals should not be blamed for the mistakes of leaders

first_imgWhen I hear the word “baseball,” particularly MLB, all five senses are activated in my memory. What could be more endearing than the smell of sausages and beer mixed with a cacophony of screaming adults? Although I cherish my memories of baseball, that’s all it is to me now: just memories.  The same can be said for our country. Individuals should not be blamed for the spread of a virus. Yes, some people continue to be excessively irresponsible. But our country’s decision makers who failed to exhibit leadership when it was needed the most are the real cause of the pandemic’s consequences. When it mattered most, leaders decided that it would be too much to prevent an outbreak, so now we are stuck not knowing what to do next. Back in March 2016, Bryce Harper, then playing for the Washington Nationals, was criticized for saying, “Baseball’s tired. It’s a tired sport, because you can’t express yourself. You can’t do what people in other sports do.” The league has made efforts to speed games up to make watching them more appealing, but MLB has still seen declines in both TV ratings and attendance since the early 2000s. The league clearly shows that it has recently shifted its focus to the fan experience, but now in the face of the pandemic, that shift has left no room for consideration about its players and staff. Going into the 2020 season, MLB’s priorities were still stuck on getting fans to the ballpark instead of the safety of players, and now the league must work to correct itself. Baseball, traditionally known as “America’s pastime,” has struggled in recent years to find the energy it once created in the country. This year threw MLB a curveball, and the league now sits in between a rock and a hard place, asking itself: What are franchises yearning for more energy supposed to do in a pandemic? On the other hand, many countries — just like the NBA — invested heavily in safety protocols. Citizens took these precautions seriously and listened to informed advice from national leaders. Unsurprisingly, these investments were effective and countries have begun to recover.  Now the United States, like MLB, is stuck between a rock and a hard place. Fortunately, MLB may just be losing millions of dollars. The United States, however, has lost nearly 200,000 lives.  “If there’s any group that understands the seriousness of what we’re dealing with, it’s our group, because we’ve seen how it’s gone through our clubhouse,” Derek Jeter, Chief Executive Officer of the Marlins, said to The New York Times. “It comes down to discipline. I don’t think there’s any secret formula for a team to be successful through this. You have to be extremely disciplined.”center_img In MLB, however, players are feeling the effects of the league’s lack of precaution and preparation. The league failed to see how important investing in sanitation resources is to continuing a season without a hiccup. Now, because of the attitude of league officials and the shortcomings of MLB’s policies to protect players, ball clubs are frustrated with the consequences of positive cases. Just on the Miami Marlins alone, 17 players have tested positive for the coronavirus this season.   The discipline in the league should not be on players but on club owners, managers and franchisees — the people making decisions. The players continued their lives like every other American but with more traveling and social interaction. These players were not afforded the option to work from home or in a bubble, so blame should not be placed on them if the coronavirus spreads throughout the league.   Like MLB, the United States had more than adequate time to respond to the threat of the coronavirus and build a plan around it. However, it refused to invest the resources needed and left decisions to be made by individual citizens. Now, individuals are being held responsible for the recklessness of their elected leaders.  In just under three months, the NBA was able to approve a $170 million “bubble” to continue the season that had been shut down in March. MLB had not even started its 2020 season, giving the league ample time to coordinate a strategic effort to hold a season and keep players safe. The bubble has proven to be successful for the NBA, which enters its seventh straight week without a player testing positive for coronavirus. Because of the NBA investing in the safety of its players and the players’ compliance with strict guidelines, the season has resumed without much issue.  MLB is struggling to grow, especially compared to the NBA. It should have looked to the NBA for a way in which to progress into current times. Instead of being proactive to prevent complications from the pandemic, MLB gives the impression that it was just going to be reactionary once an issue arose. Hopefully, when the time comes, the NFL goes in the direction of the NBA and not MLB — the latter has proven to be the wrong route.last_img read more

Schalke not letting Kolasinac from the Club?

Schalke not letting Kolasinac from the Club?

first_imgSead Kolasinac is not going anywhere from Schalke this winter, according to clear statement from the German club.Roma and Wolfsburg showed interest for defensive player of the national football team of B&H, but coach of Schalke emphasized that the club has no intention to sell this defender, as reported by Goal.“We are planning to strengthen the team with another defense player. There is several names in the game, and when it comes to Sead Kolasinac, it is sure that he will not leave Schalke this winter,” said Horst Heldt.Sead Kolasinac played very good nine matches this season in the Bundesliga, and he scored his senior debut as well.(Source: novovrijeme.ba)last_img

And,They’re Off!

And,They’re Off!

first_imgBy John BurtonMonmouth Park opens May 12 for its 67th seasonOCEANPORT – Those celebrating the start of a new racing season at Monmouth Park acknowledge, it’s been a tough year already.“It’s been quite a challenge,” said Dennis Drazin, the lawyer representing the New Jersey Horsemen’s Association, which will be operating the track.Drazin of Red Bank took the opportunity at a press conference and celebration prior to this week’s opening day to offer a brief overview of the struggle to ensure that the track, now under private sector ownership, would continue to operate.“You don’t know how close we came to shutting down Monmouth Park,” Drazin said.Drazin represents the association, which has control of the track through its management company, Darby Development LLC.The New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operated the track since 1985, had been in negotiations for some time, looking to hammer out a deal with the horsemen’s association that would allow the track’s continued operation. Gov. Chris Christie has said the state should get out of the racetrack business as tracks continued to see attendance dwindle and revenue decline. There had been widespread speculation that the track would close if no deal were struck.Among some of the hurdles that had to be jumped was getting support from the various entities needed to operate the track so plans could move forward, Drazin said.The track has been undergoing some aesthetic renovations in preparations for the season.“We haven’t been able to do all the renovations we wanted to this year,” Drazin said.In the future, he said, there will be a miniature golf course and a boardwalk-like attraction. The association plans to reconsider building a water park attraction.The strategy is to make the racetrack more of a family destination.“All of this is vital for the future,” Drazin said.Among the immediate changes for the season will be to catering and food service. “I don’t want to be critical,” Drazin said. “But we needed a change.”BAM Management, LLC will be responsible for food service this year with executive chef Erik Weatherspool, who gained some notice by winning on The Food Channel show Chopped.“We’re changing a lot of things,” the chef said.Weatherspool worked for about a decade at Joe and Maggie’s Bistro, Long Branch, and owned and operated Bistro 44, in Toms River. “The food will speak for itself,” he said.One of the big questions involves whether other types of gambling will be allowed at racetracks, Drazin said. That won’t likely happen for “five years, at least.”The reason is the Christie administration is working to revitalize the Atlantic City gaming industry, he said.“The future may very well include gambling in the northern part of the state,” but for now, “We need to focus on the revenue stream we have,” Drazin said.“We have to focus on the competitive product we have here at Monmouth Park.”Joseph Irace, Oceanport Borough Council president, who was on hand for the conference and luncheon said, “I think it’s a big positive,” what is going on at the track.“I see more excitement than we’ve seen in the last few years,” Irace said.The track is important for Oceanport, as it contributes about 28 percent of the town’s tax base and is its largest employer. Horse breeding is an important part of the county’s heritage and economy, Irace said.As for the horses, Mike Sedlacek, a trainer and owner of six thoroughbreds from Florida, said he has been spending the last few years running his horses exclusively at Monmouth Park, and living in Howell for the season.“I like Monmouth and was a little nervous,” about its prospects, he said. “Where would I go now?”last_img read more

Fair Haven Council Doesn’t Want Drive-Thrus

Fair Haven Council Doesn’t Want Drive-Thrus

first_imgCole said she believes the community is against the application namely for the “safety concerns it creates” near a troublesome driveway exit onto River Road in an area she said has already seen its share of motor vehicle accidents and collisions with bicyclists. “That corridor is interwoven into our community so you really have to be responsible with your land-use planning,” said Cole. “And what could become of it? This would be a mini-urban center. Three blocks of high-intensity traffic. Fast food is not the only form of retail. They’re just the most aggressive lease signers right now.” “The Fair Share housing plan is in the courts right now and we have our next hearing coming up in August. We can’t have something like the wording of an ordinance blow this plan up,” Lucarelli said. Cole also said the introduction of fast food establishments in that River Road corridor could alter the small town community and culture Fair Haven has developed because it could increase both motor vehicle and pedestrian traffic. Borough resident Tracy Cole has opposed the Dunkin’ proposal since its inception, hiring a land-use attorney to argue against the application at planning and zoning board meetings. For months, residents have flocked to the borough’s council, planning and zoning board meetings to oppose a proposed Dunkin’ franchise at the River Road shopping center, mostly citing traffic concerns. Lucarelli said the timeline for the examination of the ordinance could be six months to a year. But forming the advisory committee is the first step in a process that is already under way. Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli said he and the governing body will assign an advisory committee to make sure the introduced ordinance is not detrimental to the future of Fair Haven or harmful to the borough’s proposed Fair Share Center Housing plan. The proposed drive-thru ordinance would have no impact on the Dunkin’ application. But it would replace a prohibitive piece of legislation established in 1973 when the borough won a superior court challenge against McDonald’s. That ordinance was repealed and exchanged with a similar ordinance in 1998, but was removed from borough law during a 2002 recodification. FAIR HAVEN – As Fair Haven decides whether it will allow fast food restaurants in town, it is moving forward on creating a new ordinance that will specifically prohibit drive-thru restaurants. The proposed legislation restricts restaurants from including drive-thru features, like typical McDonald’s or KFC chains, or a drive-in environment like Sonic or Stewart’s. Walk-up windows are also prohibited, barring food trucks and many ice cream operations similar to Rita’s Italian Ice or Strollo’s Lighthouse. “Our plan calls for mixed-use developments in overlay zones because those are the most economically viable options,” said Lucarelli. “The plan has to pass the economic viability test. So if we outlaw all fast food uses, our overlay zones can be considered not economically viable.” To address that, Fair Haven is proposing the establishment of overlay zones over existing zoning to incentivize builders to create affordable housing. The zones would be located at United Methodist Church on McCarter Avenue, as well as in the borough’s commercial district on River Road from Smith Street to Locust Avenue, including residential properties near Navesink Avenue and Forman Street. New Jersey’s Fair Share Housing Center said the borough has an immediate need for one affordable housing unit and an unmet need of 370. Some residents believe this outlet at River Road will be dangerous for motorists, pedestrians and school children if the Dunkin’ application is approved. Photo by Chris Rotololast_img read more

Day after arrest, editor of Srinagar-based Urdu daily gets bail in 28-year-old case

Day after arrest, editor of Srinagar-based Urdu daily gets bail in 28-year-old case

first_imgSrinagar-based Urdu daily Aafaq’s editor and owner Ghulam Jeelani Qadri, 62, on Tuesday was granted bail by the local court, a day after he was arrested in a 28-year-old-case.While granting bail, the Chief Judicial Magistrate sought appearance of the local police officer on July 31 “to explain delay in execution of the warrants issued 26 years ago against Mr. Qadri.” It also asked the police to explain the “steps taken to produce the editor before the court, before declaring him an absconder.”The court asked the police to explain how Mr. Qadri was issued passport twice in the past “if he was an absconder.”Qadri, 62, was arrested around 11.30 p.m. on Monday, when he had just reached home from his office. The police executed an old summon in a case registered in the Terrorist and Disruptive Activities (TADA) court 28 years ago. Kashmir’s senior journalists and editors attended the court all day “as a mark of solidarity with the editor.”A case was registered against Mr. Qadri and seven others, including three Valley-based editors, on December 15, 1990 for circulating news and press statements issued by the militant outfits through a news agency, despite a ban on the circulation of newspapers then.”Mr. Qadri’s younger brother Morifat Qadri told The Hindu that the editor was not allowed to even step inside the house or change his clothes or get his medicine. “He would have presented himself before the police in case of any summons. The way the arrest was made shows that the aim was to harass him and his family without any rhyme or reason,” Mr. Qadri added.Shocking incident: Editors GuildThe Kashmir Editors Guild (KEG), a body of editors of Kashmir, termed the raid as “shocking”.“It is still not known why Mr. Qadri was singled out for allegedly defying the due process of law in a case he is not aware about. The KEG regrets the way a senior editor was declared proclaimed offender in books and finally arrested during the dead of the night,” the KEG spokesman said.The group said Mr. Qadri’s arrest has also led to the delay in the electoral process of the Kashmir Press Club.last_img read more

Philippines wins first ever SEA Games ice hockey gold

Philippines wins first ever SEA Games ice hockey gold

first_imgCatriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:50Trending Articles01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games SEA Games: PH bet Beram makes it two golds The Philippines ice hockey team celebrates a goal during their Ice Hockey round robin game against Malaysia during the 29th Southeast Asian Games (SEA Games) in Kuala Lumpur on August 23, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / ADEK BERRYThe Philippines swept its way to the Southeast Asian Games’ inaugural ice hockey gold medal Thursday night.READ: Filipinos break ice with 12-0 thumping of IndonesiaADVERTISEMENT LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief The PH ice hockey team nipped Thailand, 5-4, in a tense final to seal the country’s 15th gold medal in a historic undefeated run.READ: SEA Games: PH stays unscathed at 2-0 in ice hockey FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe Filipinos beat Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia before frustrating the Thais, who managed to close in at the end of the second period despite an early deficit, in the last match.READ: SEA Games: PH beats Malaysia on penalties, takes shot at ice hockey Read Next Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program Majority of the team are homegrown talents who learned to skate at SM mall rinks, which has existed in the Philippines for two decadesThat worked to the Filipinos’ advantage in the SEA Games ice hockey tournament, which was also played inside a mall in construction in Kuala Lumpur.Members of the team are Benjamin Jorge
 Imperial, Carl Michael Montano, Daniel 
Pastrana, Francois Emmanuel Gautier, Javier Alfonso 
Cadiz, Gianpietro
 
Iseppi, Jan Aro
 Regencia, John Steven
 Fuglister, Georgino
 Orda, Jorell Crisostomo, Jose Inigo Anton 
Cadiz, Joshua 
Carino, 
Julius Frederick Santiago, Lenard Rigel II

Lancero, Miguel Alfonso Relampagos, 
Miguel Serrano, Paolo
 
Spafford, Patrick Russell
 Syquiatco, Paul Gabriel Sanchez and Carlo Martin Sison 
Tenedoro. Head coach is Daniel Brodan. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LATEST STORIES The Philippines got an early 4-1 lead but Thailand refused to go away and cut it down to one in the second.After a scoreless third period, Niko Cadiz struck goal no. 5 with eight minutes left to play as the Filipinos held on to the win.Ice hockey was played for the first time in the regional sporting meet.READ: Philippine ‘Mighty Ducks’ sets out to shock in SEA GamesIt was quiet a debut for the nation’s hockey team, which was only assembled a few years ago.ADVERTISEMENTlast_img read more