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Premier photo award for Goldblatt

Premier photo award for Goldblatt

first_img9 March 2006South African David Goldblatt has been named the recipient of the 2006 Hasselblad Foundation International Award in Photography, the most important photographic prize in the world.The award, announced on Wednesday, comes with US$70 000 (about R420 000) and a gold medal. It will be presented at a ceremony in Goteborg, Sweden in November. A new exhibition of Goldblatt’s work, curated and organised by the Hasselblad Centre, will open at the same time.“David Goldblatt’s work is a life-long observation of the social and political developments within South African society,” the foundation says in its citation for the award.“His interest in the violent history of his country, and his awareness of the symbolic significance of architecture, form an extraordinary statement both personal and sociopolitical.“His acute historical and political perception provides a sense of the texture of daily life, and an important piece of missing information regarding life under apartheid in South Africa.”Major achievementsThe 26-year-old Hasselblad award is presented to “a photographer recognised for major achievements” – someone who has made a pioneering achievement in photography, who has had a decisive impact on younger photographers, or who has implemented internationally significant photographic projects.Every year, the foundation’s board of directors appoints an award committee of nationally and internationally prominent experts in photography. The committee nominates three candidates, and the final decision is made by the board.Goldblatt photographed South Africa for over 50 years, “exploring with a critical view the context in which evolve both the life of its people and the construction of its landscape,” the Hasselblad Foundation says.His photographs have been exhibited in Europe, the US, Australia and South Africa, and form part of collections in world-class museums such as the South African National Gallery, the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris, London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, the New York Museum of Modern Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Barcelona.“For Goldblatt, photography is an instrument that allows him to analyze the social and cultural structures of his country, making possible to sketch a documented and testimonial journey of the evolution of colonialism and apartheid,” the foundation says.Tolerance and antiracismDavid Goldblatt was born in 1930 in Randfontein near Johannesburg in South Africa, the son of Lithuanian parents who fled the persecution of Jews in the late 1800s. His parents were middle-class and moderately orthodox, and raised their children with an emphasis on tolerance and antiracism.His interest in photography began when he was at Krugersdorp High School, and continued while he studied commerce at university. He dreamed of becoming a magazine photographer. As a young man, he admired the great days of magazines such as Life, Look and Picture Post. After his father’s death in 1963 he sold the family business and took up photography full-time.Goldblatt is not so much interested in events, in the news, as he is in the observation of conditions in the society before they emerge in the form of events.“Behind each one of Goldblatt’s images there are several stories, most of them related to vital questions, which affect in a direct or tangential way the values by which the country moved and moves,” the foundation says.“Throughout his career, Goldblatt has been searching for a photograph that would discover, probe, reveal or clarify some of these values.”Silence of observation and analysisIn one of his first publications, On the Mines (1973), Goldblatt portrayed his environment, the people that lived near him, in his community, and who worked in the mines. At the height of apartheid, he published Some Afrikaners Photographed (1975), in which he explored the values of Afrikaner nationalist culture.In the early 1970s Goldblatt photographed the townships Soweto, Transkei and Pageview, analysing daily life under apartheid. “Little by little, the cartography of the different social and political realities of the country took on a very personal shape,” the foundation says, “in agreement with his particular way of conceiving the social use of photography; which avoided the stridency of protest to focus on the silence of observation and analysis.”In the 1980s Goldblatt photographed migrant workers on their daily bus ride from the apartheid “homeland” of KwaNdebele to Pretoria and back. Many of them travelled eight hours every day to get to work and return home.Images of packed and sleeping bodies on the bus, with faces worn by tiredness, were published in 1989 with the title The Transported of KwaNdebele. The book reveals the almost banal daily evil of apartheid, under which black people in supposedly independent tribal homelands, which were anything but independent, had to endure great hardship in going to the “white” cities to earn a living.The meaning of buildings“One of the most outstanding features of the work of Goldblatt is his ability to discover the plights of a society by observing its constructions and its landscape,” the foundation says.Over his career, Goldblatt has travelled South Africa, photographing the architecture that reveals the ideology of its purpose and creators. His images of houses, governmental buildings, public housing, churches, monuments, ornamental elements and settlements all reveal the historical values of South African society.Since 1999 Goldblatt has examined the various aspects of the post-apartheid society in colour photography.“His renewed interest in the elements of the construction of the South African landscape that reveal the complexities of this country continues to be the driving force of his work,” the Hasselblad Foundation says.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Stability returns to South Africa

Stability returns to South Africa

first_img18 May 2015Stability has returned to South African and further loss of life following recent xenophobic violence has been prevented, says Jeff Radebe, the minister for performance, monitoring and evaluation in the Presidency.He was satisfied with the work of the inter-ministerial committee (IMC) on migration to stabilise the country. It has been just over a month violence broke out in parts of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.“The work of the IMC in dealing with all the underlying causes of the tensions between communities and foreign nationals, and the prompt activation of the Natjoints [National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure], as well as the deployment of the security forces to volatile areas, has served as a strong deterrent to potential perpetrators,” Radebe said yesterday.Speaking about the progress of the work done by the IMC, he said security agencies continued to work around the clock to protect foreign nationals and South African citizens against any attacks.“We are maintaining law and order around the country. We believe the attacks against foreign nationals have been stopped because of the work done by [the] government and civil society organisations in mobilising communities to denounce the violence, and ensure peace and harmony among all who reside in our country.”Arrests madeA total of 3 914 people were arrested for various crimes during an operation aimed at addressing security challenges across the country. “It needs to be noted that while 1 650 undocumented migrants were arrested, 2 264 South African citizens were arrested in connection with various crimes.”Those arrested were held for crimes such as human trafficking, possession of explosives, drug possession, murder, robbery, rape as well as the possession of illegal firearms, housebreaking, and theft as part of Operation Fiela-Reclaim, he said.Operation Fiela is a multidisciplinary operation by various state entities to stop crime. It deals with illegal weapons, drug dens, prostitution rings and other illegal activities.“As a country, we are concerned about the safety and well-being of all those who live and work here and we want to ensure that both South Africans and the foreign nationals who live in our midst, are and feel safe,” Radebe said.He reiterated that the operation was not targeting law-abiding citizens or law- abiding foreign nationals. “The government will never authorise actions that are contrary to our Constitution and the laws of the country.”Hijacked buildingsThe operations were intelligence driven and would continue to target areas, buildings and spaces which were known to be frequented by criminals. In the next weeks and months, the government would accelerate its efforts to take back public buildings that had been hijacked either by foreign nationals or South Africans.Efforts would also be made, he said, “to rid townships and villages of drugs” such as nyaope, wunga and tik. “We are determined to take back the communities from criminals and to re-assert the authority of the state.”The IMC would continue working to deal with the underlying socio-economic issues that prompted the tensions between South Africans and foreign nationals.“Issues of migration management have been the sole responsibility of the Department of Home Affairs. As we move forward, we will be including all of government in developing a new integrated migration policy to address our challenges in a collaborative and integrated manner,” Radebe said.Stakeholders such as civil society and foreign national organisations would participate in managing migration.The government welcomed the skills that foreign nationals brought and the contribution they made to the economy, the minister said. “We are, however, concerned about those, both South African and foreigners, who illegally run businesses that are in some cases unlicensed, as well as those who engage in collusion, evade taxes, import counterfeit goods and conduct illegal business practices to the detriment of our economy.”As part of Operation Fiela, the government would ensure that informal businesses were properly licensed and local government by-laws were effectively implemented.In addition, Radebe said 5 645 people had been repatriated voluntarily. “The Department of Social Development continues to work closely with other relevant departments, as well as civil society organisations, to provide support to displaced foreign nationals.”Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

New JADCO Executive Director Appointed

New JADCO Executive Director Appointed

first_imgContact: OPM Communications UnitTel:926-0244Fax:920-4684Email:[email protected] The Chairman of the Jamaica Anti-Doping Commission (JADCO) Dr. Herb Elliott has announced the appointment of a new Executive Director for the Commission. He is Mr. Carey Anthony Brown.Mr. Brown combines qualification and experience as a business management specialist with an MBA degree from the Manchester Business School and a Diploma in Management Studies from the University of the West Indies with a BSc. degree in Pure and Applied Chemistry from the UWI. He is a graduate of Glenmuir High School.Mr. Brown joins JADCO from the Ministry of Youth and Culture where he has served as Director of Corporate Planning and Performance Monitoring. He also served in the Ministry of Finance and Planning as a Financial Analyst responsible for database management and performance monitoring. In addition to his public sector experience, Mr. Brown has worked in the private sector as Production Manager of Federated Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. and a Health Care Team Leader at Proctor and Gamble Interamericas Inc.Presently on jury duty, the new JADCO Executive Director will fully assume the responsibilities of his assignment on completion of that period of jury service.last_img read more

DSME Nabs Order for 18th LNG Carrier in 2018

DSME Nabs Order for 18th LNG Carrier in 2018

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: DSME South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) has inked a deal for the construction of an additional LNG carrier, pushing this year’s tally to 18.The order has been placed by an unidentified shipowner from Oceania. The 174,000 cbm ship will feature the M-type, Electronically Controlled, Gas Injection (MEGI) engine and  full re-liquefaction system, the shipbuilder said. The newbuild is scheduled for delivery in 2021.Furthermore, DSME has won a contract for the overhaul of KDX-I class destroyers. The latest deal adds USD 230 million to the company’s orderbook value.“It was a good idea to have a sales strategy focused on high value-added vessels such as LNG carriers and special-purpose ships. We will do our best to achieve our order target until the end of the year, and we will continue to do so next year,” a DSME spokesperson said.Just in December, DSME bagged a flurry of orders for LNG carriers: two from BW LNG, one from Maran Gas and three from unnamed owners.Overall, DSME’s total orderbook for this year comprises 47 vessels worth USD 6.81 billion, hitting approximately 93% of the company’s orderbook target for this year of USD 7.3 billion.These include 18 LNG carriers, 16 large-sized crude oil carriers, 16 ultra large containerships, and 6 special-purpose vessels.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more