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Covering the Drought

Covering the Drought

first_imgAfter months of abnormally dry and warm conditions, 52 north Georgia counties are now facing water use restrictions in accordance with Gov. Nathan Deal’s Level 2 drought response designation. Fifty-eight other counties are being required to implement Level 1 drought responses.Homeowners and businesses in the affected counties must limit their landscape irrigation to two days a week. Even-numbered addresses and properties without numbered addresses may water on Wednesdays and Saturdays between 4 p.m. and 10 a.m. Odd-numbered addresses may water Thursdays and Sundays, also between 4 p.m. and 10 a.m.The Level 2 drought response also calls for homeowners and business owners to refrain from washing hard surfaces, such as streets and sidewalks; washing cars at home or for fundraisers; noncommercial pressure washing; using fountains or water features; and using fire hydrants for any reason except for firefighting and public safety.Irrigation of newly installed turf or landscape plants or vegetable gardens; irrigation at commercial nurseries, parks, sports fields and golf courses; hand-watering; and irrigation with drip or soaker hoses are exempt from these regulations, as these are considered agricultural water uses.Counties that are part of the Level 2 drought response area include: Banks, Barrow, Bartow, Butts, Carroll, Catoosa, Chattooga, Cherokee, Athens-Clarke, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Dade, Dawson, DeKalb, Douglas, Fannin, Fayette, Floyd, Forsyth, Fulton, Gilmer, Gordon, Gwinnett, Habersham, Hall, Haralson, Harris, Heard, Henry, Jackson, Lamar, Lumpkin, Meriwether, Monroe, Morgan, Murray, Newton, Oconee, Paulding, Pickens, Pike, Polk, Rockdale, Spalding, Troup, Union, Upson, Walker, Walton, White and Whitfield.Fifty-eight counties have been designated as Level 1 drought areas, which requires water authorities to launch water conservation campaigns and restricts outdoor water use to between 4 p.m. and 10 a.m.The counties included in the Level 1 drought response are: Baker, Baldwin, Bibb, Bleckley, Calhoun, Chattahoochee, Clay, Columbia, Crawford, Crisp, Decatur, Dooly, Dougherty, Early, Elbert, Franklin, Glascock, Greene, Hancock, Hart, Houston, Jasper, Jefferson, Jones, Laurens, Lee, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, Marion, McDuffie, Miller, Mitchell, Muscogee, Oglethorpe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Quitman, Rabun, Randolph, Richmond, Schley, Seminole, Stephens, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Terrell, Towns, Twiggs, Warren, Washington, Webster, Wilkes and Wilkinson.University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has a long list of resources for homeowners and farmers coping with the drought, and for members of the media covering the drought.Experts for covering the drought:Local UGA Extension Agents Every county in Georgia has access to a local expert on local drought conditions and water conservation measures. Visit extension.uga.edu to find your local agent.Climate SciencePam Knox, agricultural climatologist for UGA [email protected] (Email is best)706-310-3467Knox is a good source for historical context for this drought as well as explanations of the climatological patterns that have kept Georgia warmer and drier than normal.blog.extension.uga.edu/climate/gaclimate.com/Home LandscapesSheri Dorn, coordinator for the Georgia Master Gardener Extension Volunteer [email protected] has a wide-ranging horticultural background and has led the Georgia Master Gardener program as the group has focused on water conservation education.She can offer a multitude of tips for helping your landscape survive dry times.She coordinates a team of hundreds of volunteers working in gardens and communities across Georgia and is a great source for perspective for what the drought looks like in different parts of the state.Agriculture Gary Hawkins, agricultural water resources specialist for UGA [email protected] is a source for information on agricultural water use and the drought’s impact on agriculture.Green Industry Ben Campbell, UGA applied economist who focuses on the impact of the green [email protected] is an economist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences who studies the impact of the green industry.Clint Waltz, UGA Extension turfgrass [email protected] is a source for information on the science behind your lawn during a drought.Matt Chappell, UGA Extension nursery plant production specialist706-542-9044 [email protected] can help explain how the drought is impacting the nursery industry and landscape shrubs.last_img read more

Delaney shoots down expansion rumors

Delaney shoots down expansion rumors

first_imgCHICAGO — For a week in late July, speculation ran rampant after a story in the Des Moines Register seemed to imply the Big Ten was actively considering expanding to a 12-team league. Such a move would likely mean splitting the league into two divisions, with divisional champions meeting in a conference championship game.”I think we need to look at [expansion] in the next year,” Big Ten Conference Commissioner Jim Delaney told the newspaper. Although at the time Delaney did not name any possible teams to join the league, that didn’t stop newspaper columnists, message board posters, bloggers or anyone else with an opinion to share, from throwing in their two cents as to which schools may be on the conference’s wish list. At the Big Ten Conference Media Day, July 31, Delaney attempted to dispel much of the talk by saying in the aftermath of the initial report — which he deemed correct — fans and observers misinterpreted his comments and that expansion is not a “front-burner issue.” “It’s interesting that as it gets out there and gets reiterated, you might think the Big Ten is about to expand when that is not the case,” Delaney said. “What I said was every 3-5 years we look at expansion and we will continue to look at it.”Delaney did concede that with the Big Ten Network set to launch Aug. 30, the conference’s approach to expansion may change.”From the television perspective it is a little bit different. … When you have a Big Ten Network, you have more hours to produce games, more room for content,, and you also have a possibly larger base from which to distribute that network.” The last time the Big Ten talked about expansion was in 1999, when the conference tried to entice storied, independent Notre Dame into becoming the league’s 12th school. Notre Dame ended up turning down the offer, and the expansion issue faded from the Big Ten’s agenda. If the conference ever does decide to expand, a school similar to Notre Dame, or Penn State, which joined the Big Ten in 1990, will be the target, Delaney said. When Penn State was added, the conference looked at factors such as academic quality similar to the current member schools, commitment to a broad base of programs, and marketing potential before admitting the school. Delaney did come out strongly against the notion that the league would expand with the purpose of adding a championship game to the football schedule. “We’re not looking for a championship game. If we were looking for a championship game, we would have had one 15 years ago.” Delaney said.Not a “plus”In every college football season as of late, the Bowl Championship Series and the possibility of replacing it with a playoff system similar to every other major sport becomes a major issue. One position seen as a compromise has been the “plus one” model, which would pair the winners of two bowls in a national championship game. Delaney, however, said the conference does not support that idea. “We don’t see how the “plus one” works without seeding, and we don’t see how seeding would work and still maintain the traditional Rose Bowl,” he said. Traditionally, the Rose Bowl is played between the Big Ten champion and the champion of the Pac-10 Conference.Test timeThe Big Ten is joining the national drug testing movement. Delaney announced, beginning this year., 10 percent of athletes in the Big Ten will undergo testing for performance-enhancing drugs. The tests will not look for recreational drugs, and a first positive test will trigger a suspension of one year.last_img read more

Students tackle global health competition

Students tackle global health competition

first_imgThe 2017 USC Global Health Case Competition was held at the Health Sciences Campus on Tuesday. Undergraduate and graduate students were challenged to propose solutions to a case in front of USC faculty and global expert judges, and the winning team will represent USC at the International Emory Global Health Competition in Atlanta, Ga. on March 25. To qualify for the USC Global Health Case Competition, teams of five members from at least three different USC schools were challenged with designing sustainable, innovative and low cost operating rooms which could meet cleft palate surgical needs in Nicaragua. The winning team of the USC Global Health Case Competition comprised of Brantynn Washington, Ashley Millhouse, Julian Cernuda, Hrant Gevorgian and Cristina Gago.  Winners of this case competition will represent USC in Atlanta, Ga. at the fifth International Emory Global Health Competition. EGHI has focused on global health-related cases for six years now, offering international and domestic undergraduate and graduate students the opportunity to propose solutions to critical global health issues. Last year, students from 24 universities came together at the international competition to develop strategies for preventing and treating obstetric fistula in India. Students from USC received an honorable mention in 2012. This year’s winning team at USC presented a holistic, multidisciplinary approach to the case, developing a solution using solar-powered autoclaves, unused medical equipment, online technical repair forums and building recycling and storage containers. Their goal was to create a system which can work anywhere in the world, using solely sustainable equipment.Freddie Brindopke, a judge for the competition, said that the winning team had a unique strategy.“There were a lot of really good presentations today, but a lot of them only took one angle,” Brindopke said. “This team really took a whole, comprehensive approach.” A judge’s panel of USC faculty and global experts such as Brindopke, the project manager of Operation Smile and project coordinator of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, critiqued the teams’ creativity, innovation, quantitative and qualitative analysis, strategies of implementation and delivery. “It was done in a very professional manner. You could tell they put a lot of time into it, and they were all in sync with the presentation,” Brindopke said about the winning team. Each team was required to present their analyses and proposals in a Microsoft PowerPoint, and was given only 15 minutes to present and 10 minutes to answer questions from the judges. “It was very humbling to win because we were against teams from everything ranging from education, social work, business school, engineering, physicians, so it really just was wonderful to see all of the ideas,” said Millhouse, a master’s student in public health.Team members will travel on their own to the international competition, which comprises of global multidisciplinary guest university teams. Here, Washington, Millhouse, Cernuda, Gevorgian and Gago will face a new challenge and compete with other students from all around the world. “I really wish we had more opportunities like this,” Millhouse said. “For people all over the world to come together because I think that’s where feasible solutions really happen.”last_img read more