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Motorists angry at new price plan at city car park

Motorists angry at new price plan at city car park

first_imgEmail CITY centre shoppers have reacted angrily to the new price plan at the Q car park at Harveys Quay, where motorists are now charged at 15 minute intervals.In a recent article The Limerick Post revealed the prices at various multi-story carparks around the city, and, with their new price plan of .60 cent per 15 minutes, the Q facility at Dunnes on Henry Street, emerged as the most expensive in the city, at 2.40 euro per hour.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A company representative told The Post that the rate reduced to two euro per hour, after the first three hours.Teresa Moloney, from Thomondgate, now living in Kilmore, was outraged when she discovered that the charge had increased by 50 cent from the previous rate of 1.90 euro per hour.“I couldn’t believe they would increase the price by so much and try to make out that they were doing us a favour by reducing it from 2.40 to two euro after the first 3 hours. That is still extortionate”, Teresa told The Post.“Nobody would come into town, park and spend just 15 minutes there. Also, if you are one minute over that you have to pay for the next 15, so if you are there for, say, just 31 minutes it would cost 1.80 euro!“The location suits me perfectly and, as a woman in my 60’s, I am not a fan of having to walk too far, but I want to boycott the place now. I would be prepared to march in protest over the cost”.Another angry Q car park customer was Mairéad Portley, who told The Post that she would be reluctant to shop in the city centre in future due to the price of parking there.She said: “To my horror last Friday, I noticed that Q car park at Dunnes had changed its billing system to 15 minute intervals.“I parked there from 11 am to 2.15 pm to enjoy some lunch and shopping in the city centre. The cost of this parking was 9.20 euro, an incredible rip off.“I, for one, will never park here again and will be most reluctant to shop in the city in future.“While in France recently, I parked in the city centre of Dijon, where it was 50 cent per hour. In essence, an hour parking in the Q car park is now 2.40, which compares negatively against other carparks in the city.“In recessionary times, I would expect prices to drop rather than increase”.In light of the comments received from unhappy customers, The Limerick Post contacted the headquarters of Q car parks in Dublin, seeking an explanation for the change in the price plan.Breda Leonard, head of marketing at the company, told us: “The price change was introduced at the beginning of August after we had been approached by customers and retailers who asked us to consider a 15 minute interval charge.“The motivation behind their request was to allow customers the opportunity to pay solely for the time they spent shopping. Previously, if an individual spent one hour and five minutes in the car park they would be charged for two hours. The 15 minute interval charge is more flexible and in current times, everyone is more conscious of spending.“We have discovered by chatting to customers that 62 per cent of them have made savings since we introduced the change. The plan was rolled out in Cork, Limerick, Galway and Dublin, but Limerick is the only place where we have received predominantly negative feedback.Ms. Leonard stated that a survey with a number of questions would be circulated to the carparks, and concluded that Q car parks would be happy to revert back to the hourly charge if that is what the majority of customers wanted.There is, as of yet, no date set for when the final decision on prices at the car park will be made. Advertisement Print Facebook Twittercenter_img Linkedin WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsMotorists angry at new price plan at city car parkBy admin – September 10, 2009 961 Previous article‘Feuds brought to Elm Park’ – claimNext articleMeadow Land’s Close call adminlast_img read more

Leveling the medical playing field

Leveling the medical playing field

first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.In Mary Tate’s native Wisconsin, for every white baby who dies before reaching his or her first birthday, nearly three black babies die.Tate, who grew up in Kenosha, a city of about 100,000 in the state’s southeastern corner, wants to treat that disadvantage, along with other expressions of the racial and ethnic disparities shown in the U.S. health care system. After graduating from Harvard Medical School (HMS) this spring, she will begin an obstetrics and gynecology (OB-GYN) residency program in Chicago, just an hour’s train ride from home. She will split her time between Northwestern Medicine Prentice Women’s Hospital and the John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County which serves as a safety net for disadvantaged neighborhoods.“I’ll be getting to do the thing I’ve been dreaming about since I was a little girl. I’m over the moon, I’m so excited,” Tate said. “One of the reasons why I came to medicine is I want to take care of people who look like me. I want to think about health inequities for black women.”Tate, who says one of her goals is to help diversify the face of medicine, credits her academic success to her mother, who continually preached the value of education to her eight children. Tate traces her interest in medicine to the day she asked her mother where babies come from. The response was that an obstetrician delivers them. Tate acknowledges that she was too young to really know what that meant; nonetheless, the idea stuck. She remembers raising her hand during an elementary school what-do-you-want-to-be-when-you-grow-up lesson, and asking, “How do you spell ‘obstetrician’?”“She is easily the strongest person I know,” Tate said of her mother, Chryel. “She raised us to believe that, with education, we could do whatever we wanted to. I really took that to heart.”If her mother sparked her initial interest, two of her brothers’ health struggles influenced her thinking about medicine. Her brother Yesha has a severe mental disability that physicians have struggled to diagnose. And while Tate was studying at Dartmouth College, her older brother Yeshayah, 30, fell ill and was hospitalized for months before being diagnosed with the immune disorder Job syndrome which contributed to his death. Over these periods, Tate said, she’s seen both good and bad doctors at work, as well as the limits of medicine and the critical role that physicians play, even when they cannot offer a cure.“What can we do as physicians when we don’t have a cure to give someone,” Tate asked. “How do we comfort and support a family when we can’t give them a pill to fix what’s going wrong with them?”She graduated from Dartmouth in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in biology, and since then Tate has worked to extend her reach, both as a recruiter for the next generation of physicians and to improve care of underserved populations. She worked with mentors at Dartmouth to create “Pathways to Medicine,” a program that supports undergraduates of color with an interest in medicine. The program brings alumni back to the school each term to talk about relevant topics, like applying to medical school or how to succeed in the sciences, and it also offers a summer retreat.Tate spent a year between Dartmouth and HMS working with the nonprofit One Heart World-Wide, which implements maternal and neonatal mortality prevention programs for underserved populations around the world. She spent time at the organization’s San Francisco headquarters and in Mexico.Inspired by that experience, Tate sought to create an organization at HMS that emulated One Heart’s community health worker model. She founded a group called Medical Students Offer Maternal Support, or MOMS, which enlists first-year med students to offer support to pregnant women through one of Boston’s community health centers.Meredith Atkins, assistant professor of medicine at HMS and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, encouraged Tate when she came to her with the MOMS idea, and has continued to advise Tate over her HMS career. Atkins believes Tate is among the leaders of medicine’s next generation, and described her as mature, thoughtful, and able to work with all types of people.“She’s an awesome human being and we’re really fortunate that she chose to go into medicine,” Atkins said.As a third-year student, Tate applied for a dual degree program with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. She was accepted and delayed her final year of medical school to earn a master’s degree in public health before returning to HMS this year. Her latest outreach effort grew out of her love of theater, singing, dancing, acting, and playing the violin, which she has pursued alongside her science studies. At HMS, a mentor challenged Tate to somehow incorporate those lifelong loves into her medical career. So, in 2017, Tate started the podcast “Dear Premed,” offering advice, interviews, and the latest medical news to pre-med students.With her residency looming, Tate plans to continue to produce “Dear Premed” and to think about ways to reach out to underserved communities — whether through a similar podcast or through more traditional media — once her training concludes.“I realized there’s a really great opportunity at the intersection of medicine and media to do some public health work,” Tate said.last_img read more