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Rising infections in Idaho highlight the virus’ latest target: Rural America

Rising infections in Idaho highlight the virus’ latest target: Rural America

first_imgNarvikk/iStockBy ERIN SCHUMAKER, ABC News(COUER d’ALENE, Idaho) — When it comes to caring for patients with coronavirus in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, and surrounding rural areas, Kootenai Health is the only game in town.“We’re pretty much it,” said Andrea Nagel, a spokesperson at the hospital, in the northern part of the state near the border with Washington. Critical access hospitals in nearby areas transfer patients they can’t handle to Kootenai, and as Idaho’s daily COVID-19 cases tick upward space at the hospital is dwindling.While the number of free beds fluctuates, medical surgical units were 96% full on Friday, according to Nagel, and staff have been calling out-of-state hospitals in Spokane, Seattle, Portland and Salt Lake City to see if they have extra beds should Kootenai become overrun.Nagel was careful to add that the emergency room at Kootenai is open and anyone who needs emergency care, COVID-related or otherwise, still can get it.“We’re hanging in there,” she said of the staff, who are starting to feel the pandemic fatigue health care workers in New York and New Jersey described during the spring. Despite the rising cases, however, the regional health department board voted to end Kootenai County’s mask mandate earlier this week, according to The Associated Press.The anti-science backlash from some community members, including comments on social media, taken an additional toll on the hospital workers.“It’s definitely difficult for them,” Nagel said. “I know a lot of our medical staff are struggling with that.”On Thursday, the state health department reported 950 new COVID-19 cases, bringing cumulative infections to 56,000 since the outbreak began.In addition to rising cases and hospitalizations, an average of 34% of tests were positive every day in the past week in Idaho, as of Thursday, according to an ABC analysis of data from The COVID Tracking Project. That’s nearly seven times the rate that health experts recommend staying below.A high positivity rate can be a sign that a state is only testing its sickest patients and failing to cast a net wide enough to accurately capture community transmission, according to Johns Hopkins University. The World Health Organization recommends that governments get their positivity testing threshold below 5%.At least 553 people in Idaho have died of the virus so far, according to the health department.Unlike the cities and metro areas that got hit hard earlier this year, Idaho is decidedly rural. The state’s population of less than 1.8 million means there are about 18 people living on each square mile, compared to the national average of 87, according to Census data Idaho’s outbreak is also part of a larger pattern. With just three counties left in the United States with zero COVID-19 cases, rural areas are increasing becoming hotspots.The trend is especially concerning given that so many rural communities that used to have hospitals recently lost them — 95 rural hospitals closed between January 2010 and January 2019, according to the Department of Health and Human Services’s Federal Office of Rural Health Policy. Of those facilities, 32 were critical access hospitals.Beyond access to health services, rural populations tend to be older and to have morbidities, like smoking, hypertension and obesity, which can be risk factors for severe and fatal cases of COVID-19, Courtney Gidengil, a senior physician policy researcher at RAND, previously told ABC News.As it stands, 1 in 5 Americans live in rural America.ABC News’ Soorin Kim, Brian Hartman, Benjamin Bell and Arielle Mitropoulos contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

New ‘Soundbreaking’ Series To Feature Members Of Beatles, Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd & More

New ‘Soundbreaking’ Series To Feature Members Of Beatles, Grateful Dead, Pink Floyd & More

first_imgA new and exciting series is coming to PBS this November! Titled Soundbreaking, the documentary series will spotlight various “groundbreaking” achievements in the realm of all things musical. The list of musicians who were interviewed is extraordinary, only making us more excited for the series to premiere.Over 150 artists will appear, including Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Tom Petty, Roger Waters, Mickey Hartm Roger Daltrey, Dave Grohl, Questlove, Bon Iver, Willie Nelson, Beck, B.B. King, Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz, Joni Mitchell, Debbie Harry, Darryl “D.M.C.” McDaniels, Mark Knopfler, Brian Eno, Nile Rodgers, Quincy Jones, Rick Rubin, Tony Visconti, RZA, Daniel Lanois, and Mark Ronson.Watch the trailer, which premiered on Rolling Stone, below:The series was also meant to spotlight the work of producer George Martin, who passed away at the age of 90 last week. In a statement, Martin recently said, “Soundbreaking afforded me the opportunity to tell the story of the creative process of so many of the artists I have worked with throughout my life.” As such, the series put together a short tribute with artists talking about Martin’s creative work throughout the years.Soundbreaking will broadcast on PBS stations, weeknights from November 14 – 23 at 10 p.m. ET. Here’s a rundown of the eight episodes:-George Martin and the Beatles’ groundbreaking work in the studio creates a new paradigm for pop music-Phil Spector’s rise as the first ‘rock star producer’-Paul Epworth’s collaboration with Adele on “Rolling in the Deep”-Stevie Wonder embraces the synthesizer and makes a break with Motown-Giorgio Moroder fuses R&B with electronica and the dance floor explodes-The art of sampling gives rise to hip hop-Michael Jackson and Madonna take the art of the music video to new heights-Miles Davis and Marvin Gaye use the long-playing record for new kinds of expression[H/T JamBase]last_img read more

Byzantine Catholic liturgy celebrated on campus

Byzantine Catholic liturgy celebrated on campus

first_imgAs Notre Dame strives to expand its international profile and strengthen its Catholic identity, the University has recently found a way to do both simultaneously by hosting a different type of liturgy on campusBeginning this fall, Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy is offered the first Sunday of every month at 10 a.m. at the chapel of Mary, Seat of Wisdom in Malloy Hall. The first liturgy was a great success, with a packed chapel filled with a congregation of roughly 50 Notre Dame students, faculty and staff, as well as members of the larger South Bend community, Fr. Khaled Anatolios said.While “Roman Catholic” and “Catholic” are often treated as interchangeable terms, there are millions of Catholics worldwide who do not practice the Roman Rite, and are therefore technically not Roman Catholic. While traditionally found in the Middle-East, these “Eastern Catholic” churches have spread westwards, with the Byzantine Eastern Catholic Church now present on Notre Dame’s campus.“Having this liturgy gives people a chance to come together and form a community and practice according to the way that they’re used to … there are people on campus who have this Byzantine background and they’ve never had a place before where they could worship in the tradition they grew up in,” Anatolios said.Interest in offering a Byzantine Catholic Divine Liturgy was first sparked when Anatolios, a priest of the Greek Catholic Melkite Church, came to Notre Dame.“There used to be a small Melkite community in town, but then they didn’t have a priest. When my bishop knew that I was coming here … he [wanted] to have a Byzantine Catholic presence on the campus of the most prominent Catholic university in America,” Anatolios said.This enthusiasm was quickly matched by figures on the campus, Anatolios said, as both he and the Byzantine Catholic liturgy were welcomed to campus with a profound hospitality.“I met [University President Fr. John Jenkins], at a new faculty orientation and when he found out that I was a Byzantine Catholic priest he was very enthusiastic. … He got me in touch with Fr. William Lies, who’s the vice president for church affairs and then he put me in touch with Fr. Pete McCormick, who is the [director] of campus ministry … and arranged for me to have this [liturgy]. I’ve had nothing but the greatest support from everybody on campus,” Anatolios said.He said the Greek Catholic churches have their roots in the oldest Christian history when various different regions celebrated Christian ceremonies in their own fashions. Anatolios said these different rites had crystallized by the fourth century, establishing different “liturgical families” around major urban centers. While the prayers, the languages and the styles of the services may have been different, this didn’t cause any problems or disruptions of Communion within the Church for many years, Anatolios said.This unity in the Church was finally disrupted by the doctrinal disputes of the Council of Chalcedon in 454 and the growing distance between the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches, Anatolios said, which climaxed in the Great Schism of 1054. While the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches remain distinct, several bodies within the Eastern Orthodox Church reestablished communion with Rome over the centuries, Anatolios said.“The Byzantine Catholic churches … follow the Byzantine Rite that originated in Constantinople and reunited with Rome and reestablished communion with Rome,” Anatolios said, “It’s easy to break communion, but its very hard to reestablish it once its broken. The Eastern Catholic churches came about because there was the recognition that there really aren’t serious doctrinal differences that should divide us.”Anatolios said some differences between the Byzantine and Roman rites include differently worded prayers, a greater emphasis on icons, singing and bodily movement, and perhaps most surprising to those raised in the Roman Rite, married priests such as Anatolios himself. Because of the ritual similarities between the Byzantine Rite churches and the Orthodox churches, many feel the Eastern Catholic Churches can serve as a connection between Rome and other parts of the Christian world.Anatolios said he grew up in Egypt and has connections with various members of the Coptic and Orthodox Christian communities.“As a community that follows orthodox traditions, liturgical traditions, spiritual traditions … we feel like a bridge between the Roman Catholic and Orthodox churches,” Anatolios said. He will also be on a panel at the American Academy of Religion regarding Eastern Orthodox theology.Anatolios emphasized his gratitude toward the warm welcome he has received on campus and hoped this new service on campus would help Notre Dame further connect with the tremendous vitality and variety of the international Church.“I think that’s why Fr. Jenkins and Fr. Lies were so enthusiastic, because I think that they want [Notre Dame] to express the full diversity and all the richness of the Catholic tradition,” Anatolios said.Tags: Byzantine catholic liturgy, Byzantine Eastern Catholic Churchlast_img read more