Tag: 上海洋妞经纪人微信

AA sale could generate £750,000 for charities via ShareGift

AA sale could generate £750,000 for charities via ShareGift

first_imgAA sale could generate £750,000 for charities via ShareGift  14 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 15 November 2004 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. All the donated cheques will then be pooled by Lloyds TSB Registrars who are operating the scheme on behalf of Centrica and ShareGift. ShareGift’s trustees will distribute the funds to a range of UK charities once donated cheques have stopped coming in.“If you think it’s a waste of time banking such a tiny cheque yourself, it’s absolutely worth making the effort to turn over the cheque, sign and send it back so that ShareGift can use it for charitable donation”, said Claire Mackintosh, ShareGift’s Chief Executive.ShareGift was set up in 1996 to provide a charitable solution to the problem of tiny, unwanted shareholdings that would cost more to sell than they are worth. The charity has now given away over £5,000,000 to over 700 charities by pooling donations of unwanted shares. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Centrica is working with share donation charity ShareGift to give AA shareholders the opportunity to donate a potential £750,000 to charity.Centrica is selling the AA and will be sending out cheques to 600,000 shareholders that average just £1.25. It is hoping that most people won’t be interested in banking such a sum, so has teamed up with ShareGift to make it easy for them to donate it to charity.Shareholders will be invited to sign the cheque on the reverse and return it to the company’s registrars in the pre-paid envelope provided. Advertisementlast_img read more

A hearing for pleas to right wrongs

A hearing for pleas to right wrongs

first_img Related Grant will create archive, allowing cataloging and everyday access to historical documents involving tribes across the Northeast Digitizing Native American petitions There were ancestral lands to defend, and government treaty payments that never arrived. There were local churches that needed ministers, communities that wanted blacksmiths, and schools that lacked teachers. There were patterns of discrimination, insult, and inefficiency that needed attention and redress.Though their voices are often missing from popular histories of the region, Massachusetts’ native peoples were never silent partners, Harvard scholars say. A new project seeks to restore their voices to historical and political scholarship by digitizing thousands of petitions to the Massachusetts legislature by and about the state’s native populations.“So much history displays Native Americans as passive bystanders, as European Americans came in and industrialized,” said Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government and director of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study’s social sciences program. “My hope is that we can amplify and better hear the voice of native peoples in American history — not least in Massachusetts and at Harvard. This project is part of a larger effort that Harvard and other institutions are making to clarify and highlight the role that native people played in our history and government.” The project, funded through a $275,000 grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources, is a collaboration between Radcliffe’s Initiative on Native and Indigenous Peoples, the Harvard University Native American Project, the Yale University Indian Papers Project, and the Massachusetts Archives, where the petitions are held.It involves transferring about 4,500 petitions written between 1640 and 1870 from the Massachusetts Archives to Radcliffe and the scanning center at Widener Library for digitization. By the end of the 18-month project, digital copies will be available on the Web for scholars in a wide variety of fields to review, Carpenter said. In addition, Yale’s Indian Papers Project will transcribe and annotate several hundred petitions, both making them easier to read and providing historical context.As one begins to look through the petitions held in the Archives — as Carpenter has done with earlier projects on slavery and segregation — one is struck by the volume of correspondence between Massachusetts’ native people and the government, very little of which has been documented by historians and other scholars, Carpenter said.“We’re just delighted this kind of partnership can be far-reaching. … We need to know what’s in these petitions.”— Shelly LoweNative Americans in Massachusetts were a disadvantaged minority, Carpenter said, whose property, traditions, identity, and civil rights were under assault. The petitions provide historical documentation on matters such as land claims, discrimination, religion, requests for autonomy, the places people lived, and 19th-century social life, Carpenter said.“They used the petition process to make claims upon the commonwealth and protect what resources they had,” Carpenter said. “There’s a lesson for contemporary politics on how a disadvantaged minority could use the political process to have a voice in government.”Carpenter predicted that the petitions could be useful for scholars in fields ranging from history to religion to economics. In addition, the project includes an outreach component, which will devise ways for the petitions to be used in classrooms.Many of the petitions, Carpenter said, appear to have remained unopened since they were first received by the legislature a century or more ago. Their unfamiliarity to scholars enhances the value of the scanning project, as it will make them widely available. In addition, he said, they are slowly deteriorating with time, so scanning will preserve their contents into the future.“They’re decaying. If we didn’t do something, in 50, 100, 150 years they might be lost to posterity,” Carpenter said.Petitioning the government was the most common method of airing grievances and concerns, Carpenter said. Petitions could come from individuals, groups, or entire communities. It is difficult to say what actions resulted from many of the petitions, Carpenter said, but he pointed out that even those that didn’t result in concrete legislative action often had an effect on the petitioners, helping them organize around a cause and building new community that could endure.Shelly Lowe, executive director of the Harvard University Native American Program (HUNAP), said several New England tribes are supportive of the project, which has value to them as well as to scholars. HUNAP is acting as a liaison between the petition project and the tribes, who are potentially valuable allies to scholars examining the petitions. Some petitions are written in tribal tongues, or in phonetic English, that might be easier for native speakers to understand, Carpenter said. Even those written in standard English can contain place names and other words that tribal experts could help with.Tribes could benefit as well, by gaining a greater understanding of events big and small that affected their people in the past, Lowe said.“We’re just delighted this kind of partnership can be far-reaching,” Lowe said. “It was a way for the disenfranchised to put their concerns, wants, as constituent communities, [before] leadership so they can be looked at and addressed. … We need to know what’s in these petitions.”The project, supported by the Mohegan, Mashpee Wampanoag, and Wampanoag of Gay Head (Aquinnah), includes both digitization of the petitions and consultation about them with tribes in Massachusetts and Maine, which was once part of Massachusetts.“We felt we couldn’t do it without involving local tribes.” Lowe said. “It helps us to further unfold what history looks like within New England. We find an accurate and actual history either isn’t told or is told in a way that natives wouldn’t tell it.”Upcoming events: “An Afternoon with the Poet Laureate of the Navajo Nation” will feature Luci Tapahonso at 4:15 p.m. on March 10, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden St., Cambridge. “The Native Peoples, Native Politics”  conference on April 29 explores politics in Native American life today and includes an address by Murray Sinclair (Peguis First Nations), chair, Indian Residential School Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Canada. The Radcliffe Institute is also holding additional events as part of the Initiative on Native and Indigenous Peoples. Visit its website for details.last_img read more

He was a teacher and also a friend

He was a teacher and also a friend

first_imgGrowing up in a traditional Jewish family, first in the Bronx where he was born and as a teenager in Boyle Heights, Mendie said he was taught to fear teachers. Suddenly, he looked in the mirror and saw he was the teacher. “I was fearful, but I also knew that I could quit any time,” he says in retrospect. Consequently, Mendie Koenig did his “own thing” as a teacher, speaking to the students not like a teacher, but like a friend. How many students are there in LAUSD classrooms looking for another Mendie Koenig right now? Too many, I would guess, and that’s a shame for all of us. Richard Nemec is a writer in Los Angeles. Write to him by e-mail at [email protected] local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! He opted for the latter, and it is why last year a sixth-grade class he taught in 1955 honored him for making a difference in their lives. His students from a half-century ago, some of whom are into their 60s, still remember and revere him. One of the former students from the sixth-grade class at Richland Avenue Elementary School is a longtime friend, and she invited me to meet the slightly built, soft-spoken man who left an indelible mark on her life, and many other youngsters’ lives. He left equally profound impressions at a half-dozen other city elementary schools, five in the San Fernando Valley, the last being Tarzana Elementary where he was principal the last 15 years of his education career (1972-88). One of Mendie’s male students from the sixth-grade class of ’55 was from a dirt-poor Nebraska family that moved West after World War II. He was so traumatized by the move, living in a dangerous trailer park along Bundy Drive in West Los Angeles, and his father’s wartime abandonment of the family that he refused to speak in kindergarten or the first grade at Richland School. It wasn’t until he encountered Koenig that he began to come out of his shell. Fifty-one years later I listened to him tell how Mendie, who worked part-time at the Santa Monica Sears store to supplement his teacher pay, would buy him one of the toys he’d been eyeing. What he remembered about “Mr. Koenig” is that he treated him like an individual. IN the last year I was introduced to an extraordinary former teacher, administrator and first-rate human being who labored successfully in the Los Angeles Unified School District for more than 30 years (mostly in the San Fernando Valley). He was once an aspiring actor with major film and Broadway play credits and is now a successful octogenarian blackjack player along the Las Vegas Strip. Mendie Koenig, who began as a third-grade teacher at a then-new Westside elementary school in 1951, decided his first day on the job what he was going to be first and foremost – a human being. He was forced to make the choice by a precocious first-grader who confronted him on the playground his first day at the school. Wearing his best, and only, blue flannel suit, Mendie was doing yard duty watching the kids before school began when a little girl tugged on his jacket, stared straight at him and asked, “Are you a teacher, or are you a man?” More than half a century later, the incident indelible in his mind, Koenig says. “I looked at this kid, and I said that I happened to be both, but I thought to myself afterward, `this kid is telling me something.’ Right then, I decided I had to make up my mind, would I be a `teacher’ or would I be a `human being’?” last_img