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Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected

Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Marriage Equality Rector Smithfield, NC Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected  April 13, 2016 at 5:46 pm Hill is a smart cleric. The church will lose on both sides;however, the hurt will be felt worse on the lgbt more due to the years of harsh discrimination. In the end, you will lose their souls to churches with open souls and hearts following Jesus’ words and commands of full acceptance and love of all In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 14, 2016 at 9:47 am Shame on the Canadian church. McKinley Walker says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 25, 2016 at 12:45 am Ordained people are also subject to the baptismal vows..———————————————————————————–“Celebrant Will you strive for justice and peace among allpeople, and respect the dignity of every humanbeing?People I will, with God’s help. “ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI MaryLou Scherer says: Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Frank Riggio-Preston says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release John Horne says: Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img By Tali FolkinsPosted Apr 13, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME MaryLou Scherer says: Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA MaryLou Scherer says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 25, 2016 at 12:41 am Shame on the bishops, they are the ones obstructing the change in the marriage canon, the lay members of synod are supporting the change and the full inclusion of the LGBT community Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 20, 2016 at 12:28 pm An amendment to the canon is just the start of full inclusion of LGBT people. As a gay member of TEC, my Diocese has yet to fully accept or implement the amended canons of TEC. I can say from experience that until every Bishop of TEC fully accepts LGBT people full inclusion will not be achieved. My very modest advice to the Church in Canada would be to take the first step of inclusion. Unfortunately, this isn’t end of the struggle. To say that rejection would alienate or hurt LGBT people is an understatement. It may well be another twenty years before TEC is in a position of full inclusion. The Bishops that disagree or have concerns regarding full inclusion will not be moved to change anything in their Diocese. I know this from experience. Bishops in disagreement with the modified canon or proposed modified canon as with the Church Of Canada are more respected than by the structure of the Church than the oppressed community. It seems we have more compassion for Bishops in disagreement with the Church than the very people the national Church is trying to help. From my perspective, I can only hope and pray our next Bishop wants to embrace the national Church and the LGBT community. The struggle continues parish by parish and diocese by diocese.My hopes and prayers go out to the Church Of Canada for full inclusion of LGBT people as well as for improved acceptance in TEC by all Bishops. Isn’t it simple that we are all gifts from God and loved by God. Anglican Communion, April 25, 2016 at 10:43 am The United Church of Canada has had its doors wide-open for the LGBT community The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (6) Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem “We’re mindful of our need to reach out to those who are going to be hurt or offended by a decision of General Synod,” says Archbishop Fred Hiltz. Photo: Tali Folkins[Anglican Journal] Some bishops have expressed concern about the possibility that some priests may go ahead and marry gay couples in the event that a resolution changing the marriage canon to allow same-gender marriages is rejected at General Synod this summer, said Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.“If it’s not approved, then, as we sometimes, say…there could be some ‘civil disobedience’ on the part of clergy and parishes, and the bishops are going to have to handle that, because all of us that are ordained make a solemn promise to conform to the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Anglican Church of Canada,” Hiltz told the Anglican Journal April 12. Hiltz made the comments during an interview on the House of Bishops meeting last week, April 4–8.Asked to clarify if by “civil disobedience” he meant same-gender marriages in defiance of a “no” vote, Hiltz replied, “That’s a possibility. Bishops are aware of that. We’re mindful of our need to reach out to those who are going to be hurt or offended by a decision of General Synod.”Whatever the outcome of the vote at the meeting July 7–12, Hiltz said, the bishops need to be aware that the church risks losing members who may be incensed to the point of leaving. Bishops may decide to hold “post-General Synod” gatherings, which would enable people to “express what they need to express and consider how we continue to walk together,” he said.“We have to be mindful that if it gets approved on first reading, there may be some clergy and parishes that may say, ‘That’s it—we don’t think we can be part of this church anymore.’ That’s a possibility,” he said.“If it’s not approved, there could be people that will say that, too. I’ve had some correspondence of that nature lately.“We’re all going into this synod knowing there will be pastoral implications no matter which way this vote goes, and every single bishop in our church has to deal with those pastoral implications,” he said.“I know it’s difficult for people to hear me say this, but…if it doesn’t pass, the LGBT community is going to be deeply upset—if not, in fact, deeply offended,” Hiltz added. “And we will have to seize that as a challenge and an opportunity as a church to be, I think, much more deeply engaged with them in terms of their lived experience of their lived covenantal love one for another.”To pass its first reading at General Synod this July, the resolution to allow same-sex marriages needs a two-thirds majority from all three orders—bishops, clergy and laity. On February 29, the House of Bishops announced that they were unlikely to get the needed two-thirds majority. Hiltz later told the Journal that he believed roughly a third of the church’s bishops were in favour, a third were opposed and another third were struggling with the issue.Today, with about three months before General Synod, Hiltz suggested this still seemed to be the case.“My own read…is that notwithstanding all the work that we’ve done in this triennium around the same-sex marriage issue and this resolution—I don’t actually see that very many of the bishops have kind of moved in their position,” he said. “Overall, a lot of the positions of the bishops for or against same-sex marriage in our church haven’t really changed.”Although some bishops have suggested the possibility of other options beyond a vote simply in favour or opposed to changing the marriage canon, Hiltz said no clear consensus on any such option emerged out of last week’s House of Bishops meeting.“There’s an appetite for saying, ‘Well, if we don’t amend the canon, how do we pastorally care for gay and lesbian people in our church?’ Hiltz said. “So that’s a conversation, I think, that’s continuing—it’s not one that can be rushed” in the form of a proposal, for example, for General Synod to consider this July from the House of Bishops, he said.“We’re not anywhere near that. But my sense is that conversation is probably going to continue past General Synod.”The Anglican Journal also spoke with Bishop Larry Robertson, of the diocese of Yukon, who said he found the opportunity to talk about the “pastoral implications” of the marriage canon vote during the bishops’ meeting.“Regardless of what happens, people are going to be affected—whether there is a ‘no’ vote, or a ‘yes’ vote, or a delay vote or whatever it is,” he said. “We spent some time on just how do we then deal with the hurt and the pain of a result that people weren’t expecting or didn’t want.”Many of the bishops, he explained, plan on sending out pastoral letters regardless of the vote’s outcome, and he plans on holding a day for diocesan lay and ordained leaders to sit down and talk about what happened.The marriage canon was only one of several topics to which bishops devoted themselves at last week’s meeting. One highlight of the week, Hiltz said, was a session on dialogue with Islam that included a presentation by David Goa, director of the Chester Ronning Centre for the Study of Religion and Public Life at the University of Alberta. Among other things, Hiltz said, Goa spoke about the importance of Jesus and Mary in the Muslim tradition, and told them that religiously motivated violence was “a tragedy, a betrayal of the way they understand Allah.”Another was a talk on the global refugee situation by Ian McBride, executive director of AURA, an alliance between the Anglican diocese of Toronto and the Toronto Conference of the United Church of Canada, aimed at helping with the settlement of refugees. Among other things, McBride informed them that there are now an estimated 60 million refugees worldwide, about four million of whom are Syrians, Hiltz said.Robertson said he found the presentation on Islam “very interesting,” and noted that while the Yukon doesn’t have thousands of Muslims, there are “more than you would think,” due to the influx of immigrants from countries in the Middle East.“In Whitehorse…there is a regular group of Muslims that meet on a regular basis,” he said. “The big cities have pockets and groups of Muslims.”last_img read more

Pacific Oaks Joins College and University Presidents’ Call to Uphold the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program

Pacific Oaks Joins College and University Presidents’ Call to Uphold the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program

first_img Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Education Pacific Oaks Joins College and University Presidents’ Call to Uphold the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program Article and Photo courtesy of PACIFIC OAKS COLLEGE Published on Thursday, December 8, 2016 | 11:25 am Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,PCC – EducationVirtual Schools PasadenaDarrell Done EducationHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDScenter_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Patricia A. Breen, Ph.D. Photo courtesy Pacific Oaks CollegePatricia A. Breen, Ph.D., President of Pacific Oaks College & Children’s School (PO), has signed a nationwide statement in support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and undocumented immigrant students. PO joins college and university presidents across the nation in its call to uphold and continue DACA.“Pacific Oaks is committed to supporting educational opportunities for all of our students, as well as others who want to strive and ‘dream’. Our university’s core values are deeply rooted in expanding social justice. PO strives to ensure and to teach the principles of equal opportunity and fairness for all. DACA supports these values and opens higher education for everyone. It is imperative that we continue this important program,” said President Breen.As leaders in higher education, the university presidents urge the business, civic, religious, and non-profit sectors to take part in the movement to protect DACA and undocumented immigrant students. As of December 8, 2016, over 500 public and private university presidents have signed the letter and offered to meet with U.S. leaders on the issue.In June 2012, President Obama announced the DACA program, which provides temporary relief from removal proceedings for eligible undocumented young adults, as well as renewable two-year work permits. Prior to DACA, undocumented students met significant hurdles in pursuing higher education due to a lack of legal status. Under DACA, the program has released many of the burdens undocumented immigrant students face in higher education – from gaining access to in-state tuition and financial aid, to being able to work for higher wage employment, and to receiving added job security after graduation.The statement follows below:Statement in Support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program and our Undocumented Immigrant StudentsThe core mission of higher education is the advancement of knowledge, people, and society. As educational leaders, we are committed to upholding free inquiry and education in our colleges and universities, and to providing the opportunity for all our students to pursue their learning and life goals.Since the advent of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012, we have seen the critical benefits of this program for our students, and the highly positive impacts on our institutions and communities. DACA beneficiaries on our campuses have been exemplary student scholars and student leaders, working across campus and in the community. With DACA, our students and alumni have been able to pursue opportunities in business, education, high tech, and the non-profit sector; they have gone to medical school, law school, and graduate schools in numerous disciplines. They are actively contributing to their local communities and economies.To our country’s leaders we say that DACA should be upheld, continued, and expanded. We are prepared to meet with you to present our case. This is both a moral imperative and a national necessity. America needs talent – and these students, who have been raised and educated in the United States, are already part of our national community. They represent what is best about America, and as scholars and leaders they are essential to the future.We call on our colleagues and other leaders across the business, civic, religious, and non-profit sectors to join with us in this urgent matter. For more information, contact [email protected] HerbeautyKim To File For Divorce From Kanye West After 6 Years Of MarriageHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCouples Who Stuck With Each Other Despite The Cheating ScandalHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyAmazing Sparks Of On-Screen Chemistry From The 90-sHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeauty Community News More Cool Stuff Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *last_img read more

UW looks for seniors to lead way

UW looks for seniors to lead way

first_imgBRYAN FAUST/Herald photoIt’s safe to say the University of Wisconsin women’s basketball team is not having quite the season it hoped for this year.With five games remaining in the regular season, Wisconsin is currently 8-15 (2-9) and hoping to end the season strong if, for anything, to send the four senior captains — Kjersten Bakke, Ashley Josephson, Annie Nelson and Jordan Wilson — out on a high note.Since the senior quartet came to the UW program in 2002-03, they have compiled a 37-63 (.370) record and would like to end this season unlike the previous three.”Our seniors want to finish strong,” head coach Lisa Stone said. “In our locker room right now we’ve got four sad seniors. We’re going to get them back on track and throw the team on their back because we’ve obviously got some talented, young players, but our seniors want to finish differently than they have before.”Stone believes that the past experiences of disappointment for the seniors will give them an edge in turning this season around and helping the program build towards the future.”This is the season that they want what they’ve been looking for all four years,” Stone added. “And, you know, whether they’re on the court or not, they’re trying to provide as much leadership and find ways.”Stone continues to maintain optimism and insist that this disappointing season is not a lost cause, but she also acknowledges her team has yet to find its identity. Even with only five games remaining, Stone is hoping her team can show some flashes of their full potential and make a run in the Big Ten tournament.”[The seniors] want to go out with a memorable record, and we still can, but we have to make a push and we’re going to have to beat some tough teams, some ranked teams here at home,” Stone said. “The Big Ten, there’s certain parity and we want our seniors to help lead us as we try to make this late push and the charge into the Big Ten Tournament.”Although the current season has been far from successful — or even decent, for that matter — it will probably be written off by many for several reasons.The team has endured more than its fair share of injuries and suspensions with Nelson, Bakke and Josephson all missing considerable time at one point or another this season, not to mention injuries to Brittany Cannon, Akiya Alexander, and Janese Banks.Also, the lack of a true point guard is evident with Jolene Anderson and Janese Banks — both natural off-guards — sharing the duties.Furthermore, the Badgers are an extremely young team and have been playing like it with a 0-6 record in games decided by six points or less.Nevertheless, Stone believes her program is still headed in the right direction for the future.”I truly believe what we’re doing is right,” Stone said. “We’re staying the course and we’re not flinching and we believe in what we’re doing. There are not a whole lot of changes. We just need to get things done and find ways to win and not find ways not to win.”But for Stone, there may be some pressure to put together a winning season next year.Currently in her third season on campus, this was supposed to be her breakout year after completing her first two seasons with 10-17 and 12-16 records, respectively.And with Jolene Anderson and Janese Banks returning from superb freshman campaigns, all the makings were there for at least a .500 record and possibly a WNIT bid.However, things just never came together and next year will be looked upon as Stone’s year to shine with much of this year’s young nucleus returning and McDonald’s All-American Teah Gant arriving on campus.last_img read more