Tag: 上海水磨会所论坛

Breads fly high

Breads fly high

first_imgBread brands dominate the top 10 grocery brands in the UK, according to new research from AC Nielsen.Warburtons ranked number two, Hovis number four and Kingsmill number nine in the list, which measured sales values in 2007. Coca-Cola continued to top the charts as Britain’s best-selling grocery brand, up 2.3% on last year. But Warburtons narrowed the gap, increasing by 17.9% year-on-year to £609m.However, shoppers still spent £350.4m more on Coca-Cola products than on Warburtons.The report is based on sales data recorded by Nielsen via checkout scanners at all major grocery chains. This represents more than 74,000 stores, including Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Morrisons, Waitrose, M&S, Somerfield and Co-op supermarkets, plus Spar and Londis convenience stores.Despite coming fourth, sales of Hovis dropped 4.5% to £386.6m, but sales for Kingsmill were up 6.3% to £302.1m.Smoothie range Innocent was the fastest-growing on the list of 100, as sales shot up 45.6%.The research was compiled by grocery website Talking Retail and market research company AC Nielsen. Report editor Fiona Briggs said brands that had embraced ethical issues, such as the environment, performed particularly well last year. “The leading brands are incorporating concerns for the environment in their sourcing, new product development, and packing and distribution plans,” she said.last_img read more

KOICA releases initial fund for Concepcion port rehab

KOICA releases initial fund for Concepcion port rehab

first_imgTheUnited Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) finalized the schematicdesign for the port’s rehabilitation. ILOILO – The Korea InternationalCooperation Agency (KOICA) has downloaded to the Iloilo provincial governmentthe first tranche of the US$3-million fund for the rehabilitation of theConcepcion fish port. Construction is expected to commencenext month and will be completed in one year and a half. The provincial government willundertake the procurement and construction. * construction of new wet market andcauseway The port’s schematic design wasdeveloped after hearing around 300 comments, suggestions and concerns fromvarious sectors that would directly benefit from the project. The owners ofrestaurants were more concerned about their future business. For the fishermen,it was the capacity of the port to dock more boats than before.  (LHC,Capitol News/PN) The municipal government will provideutilities such as power, water, sewerage, and drainage and will also bear thecosts of resettlement of affected residents. In a long run, the infrastructureshould contribute to attaining inclusive growth that meets present and futureneeds towards sustainable fishery, raised the level of productivity, increasedhousehold income and local government unit revenues. Concepcion’s Mayor Raul Banias saidprocurement will start as soon as the Provincial Engineering Office finishedthe backup computation. The port was ravaged by super typhoon“Yolanda” in November 2013. Once completed, the new fish port isexpected to provide adequate, quality and safe berthing of fishing vessels andimprove the access to basic fish port services.center_img * reclamation of a new fish portcomplex with total pavement area of 6,500 square meters The Northern Iloilo Fishery Rehabilitationand Development Project is an official development assistance (ODA) projectfunded by a grant from the Republic of Korea through KOICA. The rehabilitation would include thefollowing: The fish port is also envisioned tomake more efficient the fishery trading operations in Concepcion. * conversion of the existing wetmarket into a passenger terminal * improvement of restaurants/stalls It aims to boost economic growth andimprove the living conditions of fisherfolks by providing disaster resilientinfrastructure facilities and promoting sustainable fishery developmentactivities. An amount of US$1 million wastransferred to the province’s trust account recently following the signing ofthe memorandum of agreement by KOICA, Iloilo provincial government, andmunicipal government of Concepcion. The project’s major components includesite development, administration building, fish market, fish market publictoilet, causeway, and rockwall revetment. last_img read more

Scholarship available for Dearborn County seniors

Scholarship available for Dearborn County seniors

first_imgPrice Leaving Certificate or trainingDEARBORN COUNTY, Ind. — A scholarship for Dearborn County Seniors is now available.Seniors from East Central, South Dearborn, or Lawrenceburg as part of the Class of 2017 are elibible to apply for the scholarship from AIM Young Professionals of Dearborn County.There are 3 schoalrships, each worth up to $1,000 and a minimum of $250.Students are required to show their work experience, school activities, and community volunteer efforts.They also must complete an essay about an idea for a new business in Dearborn County.Applications must be received or postmarked by Friday, April 14.You can download and print the AIM YP Future Leaders of Dearborn County Scholarship application here.Completed applications should be emailed to [email protected] may also be sent by U.S. mail or delivered in person toAIM YPC/O Dearborn County Chamber of Commerce320 Walnut StreetLawrenceburg, Indiana 47025.last_img read more

FA Cup fighting for relevance

FA Cup fighting for relevance

first_imgLONDON (AP):Within minutes of lifting the FA Cup in May, Louis van Gaal discovered how little the competition factored into the decision on his Manchester United future.United’s approach for Jose Mourinho to succeed Van Gaal emerged as the Dutch coach was facing the media at Wembley Stadium straight after beating Crystal Palace. Two days later, Van Gaal was booted out of United, paying the price for failing to secure Champions League qualification by finishing in the top four.It’s clear what the priority is now for English Premier League owners like the Glazers.United and the other 19 Premier League teams enter the FA Cup in the third round this weekend, knowing success in football’s oldest knockout competition has rarely counted less.What matters is making cash through the Premier League, which has eroded the FA Cup’s long-standing cherished place in the English football calendar over the last two decades.Van Gaal is one of several managers to leave their jobs despite reaching an FA Cup final. Alan Pardew, his Palace counterpart in May, was fired in December due to the London club’s lowly Premier League position.Going to back to 2013, Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini experienced the same fate as Van Gaal last year. Two days after winning the cup, Mancini was turfed out of his job.Perhaps the only manager the FA Cup has mattered to in recent years was Arsene Wenger, with successes in 2014 and 2015 easing some of the heat he has faced for Arsenal’s failure to win the Premier League since 2004.Wenger’s last cup final victory came against Aston Villa in May 2015. Given that Villa hadn’t won a major trophy since the 1996 League Cup or won the FA Cup since 1957, reaching the final was a proud day for manager Tim Sherwood. Five months later, Sherwood was dismissed and he hasn’t found another job.No current manager has more experience of the FA Cup and the debate about its lustre than Wenger, who has spent 21 years at Arsenal.”I have no special solution,” the Frenchman said. “But as well, when April comes and May comes and teams go to Wembley, it’s something special … it’s a big priority for us.”Arsenal travel to Preston tomorrow, which is 11th in the 24-team second-tier League Championship. Preston North End’s heyday was in the 19th century, winning the top tier twice and the FA Cup once. The northern English club’s last major honour was lifting the FA Cup in 1938.Here is a look at the pick of the third-round fixtures involving Premier League teams against lower-league sides.MAN UNITED-READINGUnited’s cup defence begins with a reunion as former defender Jaap Stam returns to Old Trafford. The Dutchman won the cup in United’s 1998-99 treble-winning season along with the Premier League and Champions League.”I’m not going to make a big thing of it because I’m not going to be waving,” Stam said.That’s because the next time he returns to United he hopes it is because Reading, currently third in the Championship, are back in the Premier League.TOTTENHAM-ASTON VILLASteve Bruce, whose Hull side lost the 2014 final to Arsenal, is midway through his first season at Aston Villa. There’s little doubt his main task is returning the team to the Premier League, but it is a place below Preston in 12th place, and seven points from the play-off spots.Tottenham are likely to use the cup on Sunday as a chance to rest the key players behind the five-match league-winning run, crowned by the victory over Chelsea on Wednesday that lifted Mauricio Pochettino’s side to third.last_img read more

Manuel Pellegrini backs Wilfried Bony to be ‘the player we need’ for Man City next season

Manuel Pellegrini backs Wilfried Bony to be ‘the player we need’ for Man City next season

first_imgManuel Pellegrini is convinced Wilfried Bony will become “the player we need” despite the striker’s struggles following his move to Manchester City.Bony has started only twice for City since leaving Swansea in January for an initial £25million fee which could yet rise to £28million, but the Ivorian notched a late clincher against his former club on Sunday during City’s 4-2 victory.And City manager Pellegrini feels Bony will justify the club’s huge investment in him next season after the 26-year-old’s difficult settling-in period at the Etihad Stadium.“He was very unlucky maybe this year when we bought him because he started by going to the Africa Cup of Nations and he came back with a lot of games in his body,” Pellegrini said.“After that he had an important injury in his ankle and his knee in the same leg, so he stopped for about three or four weeks.“After that we won five games in a row and I didn’t want to make changes during this moment.“But it’s very important for him to play the minutes he can, first last week against Queens Park Rangers and now he has participated with a goal at Swansea.“I am absolutely sure we bought the player that we need and that he will be important in our future.” Wilfried Bony 1last_img read more

Evolutionary Explanations Add Illogic to Speculation

Evolutionary Explanations Add Illogic to Speculation

first_img(Visited 56 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Some evolutionary explanations may sound reasonable until you do the accounting from Darwin’s explanatory resources.Sealing their fate:  An article on seal (pinniped) evolution on Science Daily seems to give a straightforward account of why some species exhibit sexual dimorphism – large disparities between male and female body types.  Many seals, for instance, have large, dominant males who battle for control of their harems.  But can that fact have anything to do with climate change?A new study using the fossil record establishes that sexual dimorphism in pinnipeds, marked by harem-like behavior, arose around 27 million years ago in association with changing climatic conditions. Taken in the modern context of climate change, this research has major implications for the future of the species.The problem with the explanation is that a cause as broad as climate change should affect many more kinds of animals than pinnipeds.  And if seals are particularly prone to climate-generated sexual dimorphism, why do some species of seals exhibit it, and others do not?  Why would climate make the males large and dominant, but never the females?  The explanation appears vacuous when one realizes that temperature (climate) has no causative power; it just is.  Since the theory could explain opposite results with equal ease, it really explains nothing at all.Yet the article praises Thomas Cullen, a graduate of Carleton University, for making a “discovery” about pinnipeds that was published in the journal Evolution.  He apparently found an association between one fossil (presumed “ancestral”) that might show sexual dimorphism with estimates in evolutionary time of when the climate changed over an imagined period of 7 million years.  As philosophers are quick to point out, correlation is not causation.  Here’s how Cullen reasoned:Once Cullen and his team addressed the question of when sexual dimorphism in pinnipeds evolved, he was able to turn to the question of why it happened.”Our interpretation is that these changes were happening at a time when Earth was experiencing major climate and ocean circulation changes. Harem colonies were likely located at ocean upwelling sites that concentrate nutrients in otherwise nutrient-poor water. We think that this environmental factor, this concentration of large numbers of pinnipeds into one area, pressured them into developing the harem mating system and sexual dimorphism.”It’s not clear, though, why concentrated populations should make males big and females small.  Presumably it could lead to equality, or reduced fecundity.  If the evidence pointed that way, would Cullen admit to being falsified?  Unlikely; he could probably explain the opposite case with equal ease, appealing to evolutionary theory.  Nevertheless, he leaped from this highly speculative “explanation” into politics, worrying that today’s “climate change” might pressure modern seals toward sexual dimorphism:“Climate change today appears to be having an effect on the Arctic and Antarctic more than on the temperate and equatorial latitudes. Most Arctic and Antarctic pinnipeds aren’t really sexually dimorphic, and we think this is because the water in those areas is quite nutrient rich. The pinnipeds there didn’t have that selection pressure to form harem behavior because of the wide availability of nutrients. Going forward, if the effect of climate change is increased water temperature in the Arctic and Antarctic, it would suggest that the nutrient levels will be reduced. This could put more pressure on pinnipeds in the polar regions areas to form colonies and, as a result, harem behavior.”For one thing, Cullen doesn’t make it clear why we should be worried about it, even if he is right.  Before “climate change” became a political football, there have been dimorphic species and non-dimorphic species in the same environments.  Monogamous birds whose males and females look alike live alongside ungulates who maintain harems.  This undermines the suggestion that climate is a “cause” of dimorphism.  Additionally, is Cullen sneaking in some morality into the picture, suggesting that it would be “bad” if seals are driven toward dimorphism?  If evolution produces both outcomes, what’s the problem?Any way you look at Cullen’s evolutionary “explanation,” therefore, it is speculative and illogical.  He stacks a big explanatory burden on one fossil, of doubtful date that is not indisputable evidence of dimorphism to begin with.  Yet Cullen goes on to trumpet his “discovery” as a triumph of Darwinian theory:Cullen’s research presents some of the earliest evidence in marine mammals of what Charles Darwin wrote about when positing his theories of sexual selection in evolution. There has been a relative lack of new data on sexual dimorphism in the fossil record until now.“This paper shows that the fossil record can be really useful in answering evolutionary questions that could otherwise not be addressed,” says Cullen. “It also shows that a combination of modern and fossil analysis is crucial to thoroughly addressing evolutionary problems. We were really lucky to have access to a specimen of this nature.”Evolutionary puzzle solved!  PhysOrg celebrated how researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute succeeded in “Solving an evolutionary puzzle” – how some small fish in New Bedford Harbor developed resistance to PCBs.  The explanation?  The little fish, named killifish, lost a function:Normally when fish are exposed to harmful chemicals, the body steps up production of enzymes that break down the pollutants, a process controlled by the AHR2 protein. Some of the PCBs are not broken down in this way, and their continued stimulation of AHR2 disrupts cellular functions, leading to toxicity. In the New Bedford Harbor killifish, the AHR2 system has become resistant to this effect.“The killifish have managed to shut down the pathway,” said Mark Hahn, a biologist at WHOI and coauthor of the paper. “It’s an example of how some populations are able to adapt to changes in their environment—a snapshot of evolution at work.”Losing functions is not going to help Darwinism in the long run.  It’s like the merchant who lost money on every sale but hoped to make it up in volume.  Here, a complex system involving enzymes was shut down; nothing new was innovated by a Darwinian process.  This case is reminiscent of what Ken Ham said in his recent debate (2/05/14); he recalled a teacher giving a prime example of “evolution at work” in the case of cave fish going blind.  No logic can support a theory that accounts for all the advances in organismal complexity by a series of retreats, or by breaking complex systems that already exist.Being fair to spite:  Another example of a speculative evolutionary explanation with dangling logical lapses was published on Live Science, “Fairness May Have Evolved from Spite.”  Right off the bat, we see hedging of bets: it “may have evolved” this way.   A reader is thus granted permission to respond, “Then again, it may not have” (see 2/19/14).  Staff evolutionist Stephanie Pappas, who routinely justifies various sexual perversions on evolutionary grounds (e.g., 2/14/13), here used a Tufts University study to turn “negative” spite into a “positive” evolutionary force for good:The study is based on a theoretical model, not human experiments, but it opens up the possibility that fairness evolved not out of Kumbaya-style cooperation, but out of a need to get by when others act spiteful. In an economic game, the study found, fair behavior evolved in order to survive in an environment where spiteful players thrived.America’s illustrious AAAS chimed in with a rhetorical question, “Did Fairness Evolve from Spite?”  The default response should be, “No, until you prove it.”Once again, though, this “suggestion” did not provide a Darwinian explanation.  It did not tie a genetic mutation in the gametes to the trait, and then account for the trait’s spread by population genetics.  Did spite happen by chance, or by design?  If humans (or animals) started acting spiteful, how did that happen by unguided natural processes?  Did a cosmic ray hit the sperm of a male, turning his offspring toward a propensity for spitefulness?  Was that morally wrong?  The articles contain a subtext that spite is bad, and fairness is good.  That’s a moral judgment that Christians can understand, but it has no place in Darwinian theory. Yet “evolution” is offered throughout as the explanation for the origin of fairness.  Science Magazine speculates recklessly:Though they warn against generalizing to humans, the researchers point out that if fairness is the basis for a moral society, then paradoxically, spite may have played a role in the evolution of morality.That statement makes no sense in Darwinian theory.  Even if these behaviors are somehow tied to genetic mutations and natural selection, there is no way for Darwinism to predict that fairness would arise in the first place, or persist, or become dominant.  There are certainly no grounds for judging spitefulness to be immoral.  The whole explanation is speculative and theoretical, derived from “game theory,” not empirical observation and tests.  It’s also reductionist, taking the wind out of any moral judgment humans might make in law or public policy.  It reduces everything to games of winners and losers, not right and wrong.Left hanging:  Lucy Fiske made an observation that was hard to fit into her understanding of human nature, if fairness or altruism are products of blind, unguided natural contingencies.  PhysOrg reported her observing Indonesians willing to travel some distance to act as human shields against terrorists.  In “A rare insight into human kindness,” she said, “I was really moved by stories they told me about helping each other … It is more of a goodwill story than I expected because of the care from Indonesians.”  If evolutionary theory was any help explaining her emotional response to this observation, she didn’t mention it.If we can accomplish one thing here, it is to help readers see through the phony triumphalism of the Darwin Party, a group of phonies who pretend to represent “science” that must be protected in the schools.  OK, then, look at their explanations.  What are they?  They are speculative, illogical, vacuous stories pretending to be scientific explanations.  Darwinians can’t even remain true to their own theory, let alone account for the origin of fish, seals, and human beings.  Study these examples to see how they ply their trade in divination: using a questionable fossil to spin a tale about millions of years, using a breakdown to support a theory of innovation, using what they know to be a moral evil to weave a story about the origin of moral goodness.  You don’t have to be a Christian to condemn this.  It’s pure nonsense on its face.  If you respect true science, how can you endure this?  Everyone should be laughing out loud, not honoring these people as the receptacles of wisdom.Darwinians are the modern mesmers, captivating the weak-minded with silly notions.  They are the charlatans, the pretenders, the hoodwinkers.  Don’t drink the Darwine!  It’s snake oil, turning the drinker’s cerebral cortex into oatmeal, putting a silly grin on his face, making him believe he is a champion of science and reason.  The “explainers” in the above stories are themselves Darwinoholics.  They are drunk on Charlie’s “zombie idea,” expressing “irrational exuberance” over what?  Nonsense, non-science, non-sentience.  Don’t be captivated by their siren song.  Instead, be a taker of captives (2 Corinthians 10:5).last_img read more

Ford South Africa ‘a true global player’

Ford South Africa ‘a true global player’

first_img29 November 2010US ambassador to South Africa Donald Gips, visiting Ford’s engine plant outside Port Elizabeth, praised the workers for the part they played in securing an international engine contract, describing the US carmaker’s local arm as a “true global player”.Gips and Bill Lehmberg, economic officer at the US Consulate General in Cape Town, visited the plant recently in order to gain first-hand insight into the massive investment in the facility in the build-up to the production of the new-generation Puma diesel engine.Important investment in SAIn a statement last week, Ford said it was investing more than R3-billion in the Struandale engine plant in Port Elizabeth for the Puma engine, as well as in the Silverton assembly plant in Pretoria for the production of the new-generation Ranger compact pick-up – with most of the capacity destined for export markets when the projects came on line in 2011.“Ford has made an important investment in South Africa, and as my role is to promote more investment and trade between our two countries, I wanted to see the progress first hand,” Gips said. “It has been a wonderful experience to witness the transformation of the Struandale engine plant.“The thing that struck me most during our tour of the plant is that this is a truly global economy. You see machines made in Germany, engineers from America and India, cast-iron components from Brazil, all put together as part of this global product that is the new Puma engine.”Guaranteeing Ford’s futureGips also congratulated the Struandale engine plant team on the effort they had put into winning the contract for the high-tech new Puma engine, having competed against numerous other top-ranked plants around the world.“It’s clear that it took a remarkable effort and commitment to win the Puma contract for the Struandale engine plant and, importantly, this has guaranteed Ford’s future in this region,” Gips said.“It really is a win-win situation for South Africa and the US that Ford is able to produce the engine and components here and, in doing so, create jobs and become a true global player.”Unique privilageThe Puma engine programme will see the Port Elizabeth facility producing 220 000 component sets (engine head, block and crankshaft) annually as of April 2011, 75 000 of which will be used for the assembly of complete engines for shipping to Silverton for the new Ranger, beginning in June 2011.The Struandale engine plant enjoys the unique privilege of being the sole source of machined components for the new generation Ranger, and shares the engine assembly volume for the Puma programme.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more