Tag: 上海后花园Jorne

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first_img Feature | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | October 23, 2018 | By Greg Freiherr WEB EXCLUSIVE: SBRT As Safe And Effective As Conventional RT For Some Prostate Cancer Patients With its shorter course of treatment,… read more News | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | January 31, 2019 Stereotactic Radiotherapy Improves Long-Term Survival in Stage-IV Cancers The first report from a phase II, multi-center clinical trial indicates stereotactic radiation can extend long-term… read more News | Radiation Therapy | July 05, 2019 Aktina Medical Partners With Elekta for Global Distribution of Interlocking SRS Cones Aktina Medical announced that Elekta Instrument AB, based in Sweden, will offer and distribute the Aktina line of… read more Amar U. Kishan, M.D., presents data about stereotactic body radiation therapy at ASTRO 2018. News | Radiation Oncology | October 30, 2018 High-dose Radiotherapy Greatly Improves Survival in Patients Once Thought Incurable October 30, 2018 — In the first randomized, phase II clinical trial of its kind, researchers have shown that an aggre read more News | Quality Assurance (QA) | July 08, 2019 PTW to Feature New Dosimetry Technology at AAPM 2019 At this year’s American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) show, July 14-18 in San Antonio, Texas, PTW will… read more The Beamscan 3-D water phantom with the Varian Halcyon radiotherapy system. Image courtesy of PTW. News | Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) | November 01, 2018 SBRT Considered Safe Treatment Option for Patients With Multiple Metastases The NRG Oncology clinical trial BR001 tested the hypothesis that stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could be used… read more September 23, 2008 – A multicenter trial testing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with early stage oropharyngeal cancer showed a reduction in long-term salivary toxicity while achieving good tumor control according to new research from the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) presented at ASTRO 2008.RTOG launched its phase I/II trial, RTOG 0022, to determine whether standardized dose and target definitions for IMRT could be accomplished in a multicenter setting. A total of 69 patients were entered on study from February 2001 through January 2005 from 14 academic and community institutions in the U.S. and Canada. A two-year local-regional control rate of 91 percent and a 49 percent rate of acute salivary gland toxicity (Grade 2) was reported by investigators compared with 80 and 84 percent in the same patient population from the RTOG database. The rate of salivary gland toxicity dropped to 23 percent at one year and 13 percent at two years. Evaluable patients who, at central review of their treatment plan, where found to have a major variation in their radiotherapy treatment plan had a significantly higher rate of local-regional failure than patients who were treated according to protocol (50 vs. 6 percent). All institutions participating in the trial were pre-approved for IMRT by the Image-guided Therapy QA Center (ITC) at Washington University in St. Louis.For more information: www.astro.orgSource: American Society For Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享center_img News | Lung Cancer | April 23, 2019 New Study Redefines Therapeutic Dose Guidelines for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Non-small cell lung cancer is a common cancer for both men and women. Many people who are diagnosed with this type of… read more News | September 22, 2008 Oropharyngeal Cancer Patients Show Less Salivary Gland Toxicity Related Content News | Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) | July 16, 2019 AAPM 2019 Features More Than 40 Presentations on ViewRay’s MRIdian MRI-guided Radiotherapy ViewRay Inc. announced that the company’s MRIdian System is the focus of more than 40 abstracts selected by the… read more Feature | ASTRO | October 30, 2018 Late-breaking Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials at ASTRO 2018 October 30, 2018 — The American Society for Radioth… read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | May 28, 2019 Improved Imaging for Prostate Cancer Could Lead to More Effective Treatment Engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are working to improve imaging methods in order to make medicine more… read more The picture shows that time series signal is extracted from a series of ultrasound frames for classification. Each patch across a number of frames inside the prostate is classified into either cancerous or normal tissue. The image at the lower right corner shows the overall result for those frames. Image courtesy of Pingkun Yan and researchers from NIH, University of British Columbia and Queens University.last_img read more