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Colin Hay from ‘Down Under’ to the Music Pier

Colin Hay from ‘Down Under’ to the Music Pier

first_imgThe tone was by that point already set for both him and us.Colin Hay is pretty cool………And so are all of us here to see him tonight in OC.So now let’s all have a good time from here on in.Deal? Deal.Hay of course broke out all the classics in his catalog you might expect: Who Can It Be Now, Overkill, I Can See It In Your Eyes, It’s A Mistake (accompanied by a story about how his old Men At Work companion guitarist’s girlfriend was always convinced Hay was actually singing ‘Mid Summer’s Day’), Be Good Johnny and of course Land Down Under. *dramatic pause* For any of the huddled, dampened masses that rushed for cover sometime shortly after 7:30 PM at Ocean City’s Music Pier, that thunder had long since been heard while lightning had on several occasions been seen. Nevertheless, they weren’t all international interlopers, as Colin conceded keys/organist/Jimmy-Kimmel-live-veteran/Andy-Dick-doppelganger Jeff Babko (providing some mind-blowing runs on his Hammond B-3 organ that had the rest of the band including Hay stopping to watch) was the tour guide who had helped lead them to a good lunch at The White House in Atlantic City for some South Jersey sandwiches that we presume were filled with something considerably tastier than vegemite.As the crowd rolled out, the buzz in the building began seeping onto the boards while the testimonials started rolling in:Tara Berman, who travelled down from over an hour north as a resident of Haddonfield NJ said simply and definitively that the evening’s proceedings had been “Great performances, music to the core, forget all your worries, just enjoy”. After the remarkably passionate and vocal response he received from the Ocean City crowd that followed when the sound of the opener dissipated, Hay began working in a level of stage patter more akin to a Vegas or Borsch Belt comic and on this particular night in New Jersey, all his punchlines seemed to work. Immediately, the crowd was happily swimming along in the same stream as the veteran singer. Said Hay with a bit of ‘are-you-serious’ incredulity at the inquiry and Scottish sincerity in his eyes and vocal tone: “Scotland”.Welcome Home, Mr. Hay. However, his band (assembled primarily from the streets of Philadelphia) who hail from seemingly all parts of the globe (Cuba, Scotland, America, Brazil and Australia) repeatedly amazed and astounded like its leading man did. His band, while not including any reed/woodwind instrumentation, a permutation which only seems unorthodox due to Hay’s former group’s reliance on saxophone for signature components on some of his biggest hits (you can probably at least hear the hum of the sax lines on “Who Can It Be Now” or “Overkill” for example). By Matt Koelling Despite the fact that he is known best for a song in which he’s handed a Vegemite sandwich with a smile that’s called “Land Down Under”, let the record reflect that Colin Hay is actually a Scotsman. We Had Fun, Didn’t We?Come Back to See Us Again Soon.Love,OCNJ Dailycenter_img Noel says of her vocally-impressionistic/Celia-Cruz-channeling/flutophone-funkiness created by her own voice but mimed onstage with a delivery that would make Ian Anderson of Jethro Tull look restrained by comparison that to her “it started out as kind of something we had messed around on as a joke and now it’s become a part of the show that we just have to do…..but I like it”. Ventnor native Paul D’Amico proclaimed “the sound was wonderful and the venue was beautiful’ while his companion (at the show as well as in life) wife Marianne D’Amico enthusiastically stated about backup-singer/salsa-dancer/beat-boxer/jazz-vocalist/horn-impersonator Cecilia Noel that “you wanted to be her up onstage, she looked like a 10-year-old girl up there with all of that enthusiasm except also happening to be incredibly talented”.Cecila’s efforts were not lost on any of the rest of the crowd as she performed a mambo-like makeover while singing lead vocals on a cover of AC/DC’s “You Shook Me All Night Long” and became even more pronounced while performing a type of what she described post-show as ‘Cuban scatting’ vocally while doing a variation of all the flute parts on what became the band’s instrumental tour-de-force 20-plus-minute-version of “Down Under” near the conclusion of the show.Cecilia, while being warmly receptive to all the new fans she had made out front, also made sure to direct some deserved adulation towards fellow Cuban musician (in this case, guitarist) San Miguel Perez who worked with her on her 2015 Grammy-winning solo album “Havana Rocks” and also took a loudly well-received solo turn on guitar and vocals on this particular evening. But once we all had entered the seaside gem of the Music Pier venue, we had figuratively and quite literally found our way to the other end of the rainbow.Following a stellar opening set by veteran singer/songwriter/guitarist Jeffrey Gaines, it was time for this Scotsman Mr. Hay to do his best in front of an enthusiastic crowd who came out in the somewhat challenging conditions. The combination of pouring rain and treacherous roadblocks were not lost on our show headliner who seemed quite aware of that fact. Cecilia is not alone in liking it while we are not alone in liking her, she has been a part of Hay’s band for over a decade in addition to doing her own solo projects while also now in her off-hours happening to double as Colin Hay’s wife.As for what her hubby (whose name the Ocean City Music Pier’s featured on the marquee on this beautifully messy Monday evening on boardwalk), who OCNJ Daily caught up with shortly after he got done signing every last autograph and also accommodating every last photo request in the post-show merch-line afterward? “Oh I’m having a *great time* here. Reminds me a lot of back home, you know?” Hay began, appropriately enough, with his first album’s closer: a sweeping epic from Men at Work’s 1982 Best-New-Artist-Grammy-winning-debut ‘Business As Usual’ album with “Down By The Sea”. I say it for the simple fact that Colin Hay’s Scottish roots, once you realize his origins (Hay was born and grew up there before moving to Australia at 14 where he met the rest of his then-band Men At Work), do indeed rise up from the sea to manifest itself in a myriad of ways all across his work. All the while doing so in a fashion that you or I might not recognize immediately if we didn’t know.Can’t You Hear, Can’t You Hear That Thunder? In between there about two-thirds of the way through the show came a brand new unrecorded song called “Tumbling Down” about which Hay humbly remarked (to the crowd’s nodding and vocalized approval) ‘not bad for a new song, eh?’.Speaking to the crowd at one point about his dearly recently departed mother, who while ill Hay made promise to see his then-upcoming 60th Birthday (which coincided with her own 90th) before she passed, his mother replied to him (imitated by Hay from center stage) “OK. I promise I’m gonna make it my 90th so that I can watch you make it to your 60th but after that I’m just gonna……..fade away”. Colin’s mum, holding up her end of the bargain, then began to do just that but before doing so had left him with the following beautiful rhetorical question on her death bed “we had a lot of fun, didn’t we, son?”This touching vignette led us into the heart of the show’s homestretch, starting with the Men At Work classic “Overkill” (ghosts appear and faaaaaaade away) before then going into a couple of his own more recent classics released under his own name as a solo artist: “Beautiful World” (ripe with lyrics that echo deeply in today’s current tumultuous cultural/political environment) and then a penultimate song of the evening, a notable fan favorite solo cut from 1994 that almost drives it in too deep called “Waiting For My Real Life To Begin” which begins with one of the more overtly at-the-cusp-of-the-sea’s-shore of references:‘Any minute now, my ship is coming in’.By this point it was clear to see Colin Hay had filled the gorgeous venue with a gathering throng of true believers, now all beginning to rise from their chairs and filter out from their seats to the perimeter aisles so they could let this music move them.And even with this concert taking place on (no pun intended) the polar opposite of a clear day, when looking for a group of satisfied smiles, all that was needed to do was look around in order to say to yourself “I could see for a long way”. Tara’s friend Jenn Gregga, also from Haddonfield, co-signed her road-dawg’s statement enthusiastically by exclaiming “Rocking show, the energy onstage and in the crowd tonight was amazing”. As Colin Hay told us as he made his way out from the shelter of the shed and out into the tie-dyed-twisted/misty-shoreline-sky to perhaps grab a Kohr Brother’s Frozen Custard across the boards as a well-earned post-show dessert, we asked him for his thoughts on Ocean City, NJ as a place to stay and play.last_img read more

Professional boxers can compete at Rio Olympics

Professional boxers can compete at Rio Olympics

first_imgLausanne, Switzerland | AFP |Professional boxers can compete at the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, the sport’s governing body ruled in a landmark decision on Wednesday.But it is unlikely to see boxing’s biggest names enter the Olympic ring in Rio — for most professionals, like former heavyweight champion Wladimir Klitschko, it is already too late to take part in a qualifying contest.The last tournament is in Venezuela in July.Meeting at an extraordinary congress in Lausanne, Switzerland, 95 percent of the AIBA delegates voted in favour of the controversial move, an AIBA statement said.“This is a momentous occasion for AIBA, for Olympic boxing, and for our sport as a whole, and represents another great leap forward in the evolution of boxing,” AIBA chief Wu Ching-Kuo said.In an interview with AFP, Wu described Wednesday’s vote as “a first step”, adding that among the 28 sporting disciplines represented in Rio, boxing was the only one with restrictions on professional athletes.Wu has aggressively supported the move, just the latest in a series of changes to Olympic boxing in recent years. Women were allowed into Olympic competition in 2012 and headguards will no longer be compulsory from Rio.Proponents of the latest change argue that the admission of professional basketball to the Olympics in time for the 1992 Games in Barcelona helped make men’s basketball one of the most hotly anticipated events of the Games.Tough criticismThere is a rich history of fighters making their name at the Olympics before moving on to have groundbreaking professional careers, including Muhammad Ali, who won gold at the Rome Games in 1960, when still known as Cassius Clay.But the move has not convinced everyone, including former gold medallist and world heavyweight title-holder Lennox Lewis, who said it was “preposterous”.Former world heavyweight champion Mike Tyson last month judged the move as “ridiculous” and “stupid”, condemning the plan as a bid “to monetise Olympic boxing”.But British boxer Amir Khan on Wednesday hailed the decision and said he wanted to represent the country of his parents’ birth, Pakistan. Khan, born and raised in Bolton, England, won a silver medal in the lightweight category of the 2004 Athens Olympics before turning professional a year later.“If I am permitted as per rules and from my promoter then I would love to compete for Pakistan,” he said at a press conference.Pakistan Boxing Federation secretary Iqbal Hussain told AFP he was thrilled at the prospect of “hero” Khan representing the country.Philippine legend Manny Pacquiao, who won world titles at eight different weight categories, had also hinted he was interested but said this week he would concentrate on his burgeoning political career. Doping concernsAIBA will have to answer questions about its dope-testing policy in order to satisfy the International Olympic Committee, which is embroiled in a series of doping scandals and is battling to keep drug cheats out of the Rio Games.AIBA revealed on Wednesday that Turkish boxer Adem Kilicci was amongst the 23 athletes whose retested doping samples from the London 2012 Games have come up positive.Kilicci, who fought at under-75kg in London, had also qualified for the Rio Games but is suspended while waiting for the results of his B test.AIBA has come under fire for its dope-testing record after British magazine Private Eye reported that a World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) report found AIBA had not carried out any out-of-competition tests in the year ahead of Rio, and hardly any in the past three years.The report was quoted as saying that AIBA’s actions fell “considerably short” of WADA’s requirements.WADA spokesman Ben Nichols confirmed that the agency’s inspection team had given AIBA recommendations aimed at “improving and enhancing” its anti-doping programme, on which the boxing governing body has started working.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

And,They’re Off!

And,They’re Off!

first_imgBy John BurtonMonmouth Park opens May 12 for its 67th seasonOCEANPORT – Those celebrating the start of a new racing season at Monmouth Park acknowledge, it’s been a tough year already.“It’s been quite a challenge,” said Dennis Drazin, the lawyer representing the New Jersey Horsemen’s Association, which will be operating the track.Drazin of Red Bank took the opportunity at a press conference and celebration prior to this week’s opening day to offer a brief overview of the struggle to ensure that the track, now under private sector ownership, would continue to operate.“You don’t know how close we came to shutting down Monmouth Park,” Drazin said.Drazin represents the association, which has control of the track through its management company, Darby Development LLC.The New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority, which operated the track since 1985, had been in negotiations for some time, looking to hammer out a deal with the horsemen’s association that would allow the track’s continued operation. Gov. Chris Christie has said the state should get out of the racetrack business as tracks continued to see attendance dwindle and revenue decline. There had been widespread speculation that the track would close if no deal were struck.Among some of the hurdles that had to be jumped was getting support from the various entities needed to operate the track so plans could move forward, Drazin said.The track has been undergoing some aesthetic renovations in preparations for the season.“We haven’t been able to do all the renovations we wanted to this year,” Drazin said.In the future, he said, there will be a miniature golf course and a boardwalk-like attraction. The association plans to reconsider building a water park attraction.The strategy is to make the racetrack more of a family destination.“All of this is vital for the future,” Drazin said.Among the immediate changes for the season will be to catering and food service. “I don’t want to be critical,” Drazin said. “But we needed a change.”BAM Management, LLC will be responsible for food service this year with executive chef Erik Weatherspool, who gained some notice by winning on The Food Channel show Chopped.“We’re changing a lot of things,” the chef said.Weatherspool worked for about a decade at Joe and Maggie’s Bistro, Long Branch, and owned and operated Bistro 44, in Toms River. “The food will speak for itself,” he said.One of the big questions involves whether other types of gambling will be allowed at racetracks, Drazin said. That won’t likely happen for “five years, at least.”The reason is the Christie administration is working to revitalize the Atlantic City gaming industry, he said.“The future may very well include gambling in the northern part of the state,” but for now, “We need to focus on the revenue stream we have,” Drazin said.“We have to focus on the competitive product we have here at Monmouth Park.”Joseph Irace, Oceanport Borough Council president, who was on hand for the conference and luncheon said, “I think it’s a big positive,” what is going on at the track.“I see more excitement than we’ve seen in the last few years,” Irace said.The track is important for Oceanport, as it contributes about 28 percent of the town’s tax base and is its largest employer. Horse breeding is an important part of the county’s heritage and economy, Irace said.As for the horses, Mike Sedlacek, a trainer and owner of six thoroughbreds from Florida, said he has been spending the last few years running his horses exclusively at Monmouth Park, and living in Howell for the season.“I like Monmouth and was a little nervous,” about its prospects, he said. “Where would I go now?”last_img read more

Young Boat Builders

Young Boat Builders

first_imgYoungsters show off the vessels they built, called six-hour canoes, constructed during a session sponsored by Navesink Maritime Heritage Association on June 9-10.Teams of adults and teenagers built the wooden canoes behind the Fair Haven Fire House on River Road.last_img

Hawks sweep Leafs, edge Green and White in another one-goal nail biter Sunday in Fruitvale

Hawks sweep Leafs, edge Green and White in another one-goal nail biter Sunday in Fruitvale

first_imgThe Nelson Leafs have played very well for most of the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League seasons.Unfortunately, very well won’t get the Green and White to the top of the Neil Murdoch standings.The Leafs saw its losing streak climb to four games after Beaver Valley Nitehawks – the Murdoch Division leaders — edged Nelson 4-3 Sunday afternoon in Frutivale.Beaver Valley, winning Friday in Nelson by the identical 4-3 margin, has won five of six games this season against the Leafs.Nelson also lost 6-4 to Castlegar Saturday in the Sunflower City.“It was a tough weekend for the boys but I think it was a good learning weekend,” Leaf head coach Frank Maida said Sunday. “Our team got a good eye opener to where we need to be on a consistent basis against two good teams in our division.”Craig Martin’s second-period power play goal, the fourth of the game for the odds-on favourite to win the KIJHL’s rookie of the year award, proved to be the winner as the Hawks escaped with its fourth one-goal victory over Nelson in six attempts.Twice Beaver Valley rallied from one-goal deficits.Nelson led as Nelson 2-1 in the first period on goals by Linden Horswill and Dallon Stoddart.After Martin tied the game at the end of the first 20 minutes, Max Mois busted out of a four-game goalless streak to give the Leafs a short-lived 3-2 advantage in the middle frame.Martin then scored twice on the power play, the winner coming with 6:38 remaining in the second.Beaver Valley out shot the Leafs 33-26 in the game as Mike Vlanich out dueled Nelson rookie goalie Patrick Defoe in the nets. The game was Defoe’s first start in a few games and the Leaf rookie did not disappoint the coaches.“Patrick played very well,” Maida exclaimed. “He played solid and steady and make some timely big saves when we needed them. I was very happy with Patrick’s performance after not having played for a few games.”The weekend sweep increases Beaver Valley’s lead in the Murdoch to 14 points over the Leafs.The Hawks hold a five-point advantage over Castlegar Rebels, the team Beaver Valley meets in a home-and-home series when the teams return from the Christmas break, Dec. 29 in the Sunflower City.“We feel finishing first in the division is very important,” said Beaver Valley head coach Terry Jones when asked about the weekend series against the Leafs. “We really hate to have to play (Nelson or Castlegar) in the first round (of the playoffs). Over the past few years that’s what we had to do . . . which means you have to go through to tough rounds to get out of the division.”WEEKEND NOTES: The win for Beaver Valley, 27-5, runs their unbeaten streak to 13 games. . . .Craig Martin has been a Leaf killer this season. During the six games the Beaver Valley winger has 11 goals and three assists. Two games Martin has scored four and three goals. . . .Friday, Scott Morriseau scored three times and rookie Brenden Heinrich added a pair to lead Castlegar past the Leafs. Daylen Pearson and Tyler Jones each had three assists as Castlegar finally defeated former teammate Andrew Walton. Four Leafs — Nick Newman, Matti Jmaeff, Cameron Dobransky and J.J. Beitel — replied for Nelson. . . .Nelson had three affiliate players in the lineup this weekend — defenceman Cole Arcuri Friday, forward Colton Dawson Saturday and defenceman Andrew Miller Sunday. . . .The four-goal performance by Martin lifts the Beaver Valley sniper into second spot in goals behind Creston’s Brandon Formosa. The Thunder Cat forward has scored 30 times. Martin is fifth in league scoring, nine points behind KLIJHL leader and teammate Ryan [email protected]last_img read more