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GERRY GETS INTO THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT WITH HIS OWN SANTA MOBILE!

GERRY GETS INTO THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT WITH HIS OWN SANTA MOBILE!

first_imgGerry’s very own Santa mobile! Pic courtesy of Chris Dykes Photography.Santa needn’t worry if Rudolph and the lads are feeling a bit under the weather this Christmas.He can always give Ballyshannon man Gerry Kelly a shout.Gerry has been turning heads across Donegal in recent days after turning his car into a mobile Christmas theme park. Originally a Dub (that may explain it!), Gerry has gone to extraordinary lengths to spread the Christmas feeling.His friends explained he didn’t like to lave the Christmas lights on at home – so he took them with him!Gerry has decorated his car with flashing snowmen, Santa signs and multi-coloured lights throughout – inside and out.Friend Chris Dykes said his pal Gerry just loves people smiling at his car and it helps him to smile inside. “With all the talk of storms and water charges, I think what he has done is very nice and I hope it brightens up everyone’s day,” he said.Santa is good to go if his reindeer call in sick!   GERRY GETS INTO THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT WITH HIS OWN SANTA MOBILE! was last modified: December 10th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BallyshannoncarCHristmasdonegaldublingerry kellySANTAlast_img read more

Compromise is key as major US school reform looms

Compromise is key as major US school reform looms

first_imgIn the House of Representatives, debate over its version of the NCLB replacement was quite ideological, and culminated in the Republican majority narrowly passing a bill this summer with no Democratic support and 27 Republicans voting against it. But the Senate opened the door to the eventual compromise after Alexander struck a deal earlier this year with Senator Patty Murray (D–WA), the top Democrat on the Senate education panel, to move ahead only after their legislation had attracted bipartisan support. And in July, the Senate passed its version by a vote of 81 to 17, with huge majorities in both parties.In taking his victory lap before last week’s vote by the conferees, Alexander took a swipe at his House colleagues. “It is a great privilege to serve in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate,” Alexander said. “But there is no need for us to have that privilege if all we do is announce our different opinions. We could do that at home, or on the radio, or the newspaper or the street corner. As members of Congress, after we have our say, our job is to get a result.”University lobbyists are hoping that Alexander can also wave his magic wand to make government oversight of academic research less onerous. He has promised to incorporate pieces of a recent National Academies’ report that identified roadblocks facing academic researchers into legislation before Congress that is aimed more broadly at speeding up the process of finding medical cures. The House vehicle, called 21st Century Cures, received strong bipartisan support in July. Alexander, who chairs the Senate health and education panel, got the Academies’ panel to speed up its report by several months so that he could use some of its findings. However, he has yet to introduce his version. 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Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Last week’s 39-to-1 vote by a key congressional panel to scrap the much-maligned No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law governing federal policy for elementary and secondary schools was a rare instance of Democrats and Republicans meeting in the middle on an important national issue. A key architect of that compromise was Senator Lamar Alexander (R–TN), who has also emerged as the leading congressional advocate for an issue near and dear to the hearts of the U.S. academic research community: the need to ease federal rules that they say are stifling their productivity.The 19 November vote by House and Senate conferees is the penultimate step in putting to rest NCLB, which was passed in 2002. The new bill, which the House and Senate are expected to pass early next month and which President Barack Obama has applauded, would retain annual testing of math and reading in grades three through eight and require three science tests across a student’s career. It also folds a long-running program to fund innovative math and science initiatives into a block grant to the states.The new education bill gives states much more authority to monitor student performance, an essential change for conservatives unhappy with the current regime. At the same time, it retains the requirement that states must act to improve conditions for the lowest performing schools, a core principle for liberals. Congress has been unable to strike a similar balance on a host of other contentious policy issues, from health care to environmental regulation.last_img read more