Month: June 2021

Who is your Aviva Premiership Player of the Year?

Who is your Aviva Premiership Player of the Year?

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED Making the grade: Chris Robshaw is in the running for Aviva Premiership Player of the YearThe official shortlist for the Aviva Premiership Player of the Year has been announced, with Harlequins providing two of the six nominees: full-back Mike Brown and captain Chris Robshaw.Fellow Premiership semi-finalists Leicester are represented by flanker Julian Salvi, Brad Barritt makes the list for his performances for defending champions Saracens, while Gloucester prop Nick Wood and James Scaysbrook, the Exeter flanker, complete the line-up.The shortlist was compiled by a panel of journalists, including Rugby World deputy editor Alan Pearey, and they also revealed the nominees for the director of rugby award: Exeter’s Rob Baxter, Harlequins’ Conor O’Shea and Richard Cockerill, of Leicester.The young players involved in the Aviva Premiership have also been recognised with Wasps’ Christian Wade and Joe Launchbury, Owen Farrell of Saracens, London Irish centre Jonathan Joseph, Worcester flanker Matt Kvesic and Luke Wallace of Harlequins all in the running for the Land Rover Discovery of the Season.That’s who the experts have picked and the winners will be announced at the awards dinner on Tuesday 8 May, but we also wanted to know what you thought. Read the views of our Twitter followers below… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS [View the story “Who is your Aviva Premiership Player of the Year?” on Storify] read more

Wales 12 Argentina 26: The Verdict

Wales 12 Argentina 26: The Verdict

first_imgNOT FOR FEATURED No way through: George North is stopped by a solid Argentina defence. Wales continually failed to cross the gain-lineBy Sarah Mockford, Rugby World Features EditorIn a nutshellWARREN GATLAND’S mantra is paying off for Argentina – but not Wales.  Gatland has long said that Wales can only get better by playing the best in the world – New Zealand, Australia and South Africa. While they’ve been doing that every year, they are still achieving success in peaks – followed by troughs. The Pumas, though, have clearly benefited from playing in the Rugby Championship and the intensity they brought to Cardiff allowed them to dictate the game. They scored two tries to none – Juan Imhoff and Gonzalo Camacho crossing – and eased to victory in the second half.Opening act: Juan Imhoff runs in his tryKey momentImhoff’s 55th-minute try, where the wing scythed past Sam Warburton, George North and Leigh Halfpenny to score under the posts, lifted Argentina’s spirits and they never looked back. From that point on, they lifted the intensity, added another try and made Wales – the Grand Slam champions – look distinctly average.Star manPumas captain Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe was the official Man of the Match – it’s hard to think of a time when he hasn’t produced a world-class performance – but Camacho’s finish just before the hour deserves high praise. He showed great athleticism, balance and awareness to put the ball down in the corner as Halfpenny came in to tackle him into touch.Room for improvementWales could improve in every facet. Jamie Roberts had to depart after a nasty blow to the head in the 24th minute and after that Wales struggled to cross the gain-line. Toby Faletau aside, they need to find some ball-carriers before Friday’s game against Samoa. Ryan Jones being fit would help them in this area – he always makes yards – while North and Alex Cuthbert should be used more on the angle in midfield.Happy day: Argentina celebrateThey also need to be patient in going wide. There’s no point spreading the ball unless you’ve gone forward – make yards in midfield and then use the wide men. Mike Phillips tried to do this when he arrived midway through the second half.A final point for Wales: start playing from the first minute not the 75th. Wales’ best passage of play came in the last five minutes and they put Argentina under serious pressure in their own 22 – but they need to replicate that intensity throughout the game. It all came too little, too late in this Test match.As for Argentina, their involvement in the Rugby Championship has clearly agreed with them but they should play with a little more confidence. It was only after they scored the first try that they really upped the tempo and lifted their heads. After that try they never looked like losing. Before it, Wales looked like winning. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tries: Imhoff, Camacho. Cons: Sanchez 2. Pens: Contepomi, Sanchez. DG: Sanchez 2.Referee: Romain Poite (France) In quotes – winnersArgentina coach Santiago Phelan: “We took the initiative in the first half and in the first 20 minutes of the second half played very well. The intensity of the game was very high but the Argentina players have learnt how to play at that level from the Rugby Championship.”In quotes – losersWales interim coach Rob Howley: “I’m disappointed, frustrated and annoyed. We know we’re a better side than that. We spoke about intensity and the tempo of the game but we looked one-paced. It’s a test of character now – it’s important we dust ourselves off and look forward to the challenge of Samoa.”Top statsArgentina made nearly double the amount of offloads as Wales – seven to 13 – and made five clean breaks to none from Wales.Match highlightsWALES: Leigh Halfpenny; Alex Cuthbert, Scott Williams, Jamie Roberts (James Hook 24), George North; Rhys Priestland, Tavis Knoyle (Mike Phillips 56); Gethin Jenkins (Ryan Bevington 69), Matthew Rees (Richard Hibbard 63), Aaron Jarvis (Paul James 63), Alun Wyn Jones (Rob McCusker 40), Ian Evans, Josh Turnbull, Sam Warburton (captain), Toby Faletau.Pens: Halfpenny 4.ARGENTINA: Juan Martin Hernandez (Horacio Agulla 46); Gonzalo Camacho, Gonzalo Tiesi, Felipe Contepomi (Joaquin Tuculet 14), Juan Imhoff; Nicolas Sanchez, Martin Landajo (Nicolas Vergallo 67); Marcos Ayerza (Bruno Postiglioni 79), Eusebio Guinazu (Agustin Creevy 49), Juan Figallo (Juan Gomez 67), Manuel Carizza, Juan Francisco Cabello (Tomas Vallejos 65), Leonardo Senatore (Tomas Leonardi 57), Juan Martin Leguizamon, Juan Martin Fernandez Lobbe (captain).last_img read more

Autumn International player analysis: Anthony Watson, England

Autumn International player analysis: Anthony Watson, England

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lurking in the tramlines, Watson closes off the angle and picks off Jason Emery’s pass. It is far from a fluke – more an astute defensive read.Take a look at this from England Saxons’ tussle with the Irish Wolfhounds from January:Here, Watson does not panic and rush up, though it may be tempting to blitz given that Wolfhounds left wing Craig Gilroy has joined the line. Instead, he treads water, co-operates with outside-centre Matt Hopper and drifts towards the final attacker.Then, as the pass is spilt by Gilroy, he is in a perfect position to tear through onto the loose ball.Lancaster’s calls these kind of plays “something from nothing” moments. He values the innate ability to produce them. Calm footballing nous is another weapon in Watson’s armoury.Composure in open spaceBath’s battering of Bordeaux-Begles last season catapulted Rokoduguni into the spotlight. The Fijian tank soldier’s brace really caught the imagination, even if the French visitors looked disinterested at times. Whatever the opposition’s attitude, Watson’s early assist for Tom Biggs oozed class:While the speed is again impressive, his transfer of the ball into two hands before a dummy right and a short pass left is exceptional.Another view accentuates eye-catching decision-making and creativity:England must capitalise on line breaks against Heyneke Meyer’s men. This sort of clinical edge could prove vital.Defensive solidityOf course, England fans are dreaming if they think the whole of Saturday will be spent on the front foot. Smarting from a comprehensive loss to Ireland, the Boks are sure to charge out of the blocks. Do not make the mistake of thinking Watson will shirk defensive duty.Picture the scene: a year ago at a sodden Sixways and Worcester are already fighting for every point in anticipation of a relegation battle. The conditions do not suit Bath’s fast-paced approach, so old-fashioned grit is required. Watson stepped up admirably. For a start, he had no right to make this stunning, try-saving tackle:Dean Hammond goes high in contact, so this is a straight-up test of upper-body strength. Using the small in-goal area and the touchline to his advantage, the tenacious Watson wins. Minutes later, his positioning got Bath out of trouble again:Second-guessing an opponent as intuitive as Chris Pennell is a triumph in itself. Isolating the moment Watson swoops to pick up off his bootlaces, we can appreciate the significant skill:With Pennell in close attendance, Watson bravely comes forwards and cleans up without breaking stride.Such unfussy details may be more prominent than box-office attack in what could be an ugly arm wrestle as England look to stave off their fifth straight loss this weekend. Bryan Habana will certainly relish chasing kicks towards a two-cap rival. Bath flyer Anthony Watson makes his maiden Test start on Saturday against the Springboks. Though the mercurial wing is still 20, it feels as though this has been a long time coming. We chart his rise through the ranks STANDING IN front of the assembled press at Pennyhill Park last Thursday after being named in England’s match-day 23 to face New Zealand, Anthony Watson was asked what part of his potential Test debut he was most excited about. As it turned out, he had known the answer for quite a while.Beaming: Watson shares a joke with George Ford“Probably the anthems,” said the Bath wing, who starts this weekend’s clash with South Africa in place of injured clubmate Semesa Rokoduguni. “I’ve been looking forward to this day since I was five or six years old to be honest.”To someone unfamiliar with Watson’s charmingly innocent, grin-a-minute demeanour, these comments may seem laced with a hint of self-entitlement – as though a precocious youngster has counted his chickens long before they hatched.However, much like his brother Marcus, a blockbuster lynchpin of Simon Amor’s England Sevens set-up, Anthony is humble and grounded. Besides, a path to a full cap in Saturday’s 24-21 loss to the All Blacks – only nine months out of his teens – has been totally inevitable.I first saw him feature in an U18 Daily Mail Vase final at Twickenham back in April 2011, where he was playing for St George’s College, Weybridge against Solihull School. Having built up a sparkling reputation as an age-group star in the London Irish Academy and for representative sides, Watson was marshalled closely. At one point, his frustration boiled over into a flash point and a bout of handbags.Solihull eventually won out 28-21, but not before Watson – sporting a hair-do dangerously close to a mullet – had torn past a handful of would-be tacklers late on to reduce the deficit:Defeat that day probably stung a great deal. However, it provided an ideal platform to reinforce Watson’s burgeoning ability as an arch-finisher. Later that month, national service called. He answered emphatically.Trailing 34-17 to their Welsh counterparts with 10 minutes remaining, England U18 pulled off a spectacular heist. Jack Nowell scorched home to complete a brace, before Sale centre Mark Jennings gave his team a sniff at glory. Then this happened on the final play:Hugging the right touchline, Watson shows composure to retain width and take the offload. Two explosive steps off his right foot give the covering defence little hope. But the try is as much a result of sheer instinct as it is bristling athleticism. We know that simply because Watson has kept scoring at every level.Predatory playStuart Lancaster’s tenure has been characterised by the swift promotion of youth. Owen Farrell and Joe Launchbury are two high-profile beneficiaries. Racking up four five-pointers in 21 appearances for Bath over the 2013-14 Premiership campaign, Watson earned a place on June’s senior tour to New Zealand. He repaid the faith by doing exactly what he does best in the midweek victory over the Crusaders:More searing pace and elusive evasion is obvious here. Taking a look at another view though, we see Watson’s work-rate and intelligent support play. He holds his depth while Stephen Myler and Chris Pennell join forces to create enough of a gap:As Julian Savea has demonstrated over a special start to his international career, if you hunt space, trust the playmakers and time your running lines nicely, tries will come.Watch how Watson combined with George Ford in the opening minutes of Bath’s current domestic season:Rising to take this cross-kick ahead of Italy’s Luke McLean, Watson shows off his aerial prowess – something that will no doubt be put to the test by Springbok fly-half Patrick Lambie this weekend. Put simply, he offers many different types of threat.Something from nothingEngland’s maiden Junior World Championship win in the summer hoisted the stock of many of its protagonists. Captain Jack Clifford, Luke Cowan-Dickie, Henry Slade and Nowell garnered the most praise. Even so, few interventions were as important as Watson’s intercept-score in the semi-final against New Zealand:center_img It should be fascinating. In any case, Lancaster can be absolutely confident that he has a mightily promising prospect among his ranks.To read in-depth analysis of New Zealand’s haka and RW’s verdict on England’s midfield problem, check out the December issue of Rugby World – in shops now! Visit po.st/RWSub for all the latest Rugby World subscription deals, or find out how to download the digital edition of the magazine at po.st/RWDig. Making a splash: Anthony Watson dives over to score a try against the Crusaders in June last_img read more

France brace themselves for Le Crunch

France brace themselves for Le Crunch

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The same can be said for Francois Trinh-Duc, Picamoles’ former teammate at Montpellier. The fly-half has amassed 49 caps over the last seven years without ever really giving the impression he’s doing anything other than keeping the No10 shirt warm until someone more consistent comes along. That hasn’t happened and so Trinh-Duc goes to Twickenham with the opportunity to stake his claim to be the World Cup starter. In training recently he’s been paired with Clermont scrum-half Morgan Parra, the man who in the 2011 World Cup final was controversially picked to play fly-half ahead of Trinh-Duc.Playmakers: Francois Trinh-Duc and Morgan Parra are expected to direct operations at half-backFrederic Michalak stays in Paris, as does scrum-half Sebastien Tillous-Borde, the Toulon pair at this stage pencilled in as the likely half-back combination for France’s opening World Cup match. PSA has always had a soft spot for Michalak, while he’s never shown much faith in Trinh-Duc’s qualities. France coach Philippe Saint-Andre gave his squad a day off on Tuesday, allowing his 36 players the chance to enjoy the delights of Falgos in the Pyrénées-Orientales. The French squad has been based there since the end of last week and on Thursday the 25 players selected for the first of the two World Cup warm-ups against England will fly to London. The eleven players not required for the Twickenham encounter will return to the national rugby centre at Marcoussis.PSA won’t name his starting XV for Saturday’s clash until Friday afternoon but the composition of the squad for the first of ‘Le Crunch Amical’ has prompted the French rugby media to start searching for  clues as to the likely starting XV when France play Italy on September 19 in their opening pool game.Feisty affair: The last meeting between France and England was a feisty affairAmong the absentees this weekend are captain Thierry Dusautoir and veteran second-row Pascal Pape, both of whom are recovering from minor knocks. According to some reports, recent French training sessions have seen Dusautoir form a back-row with Clermont’s Damien Chouly and Loann Goujon of Bordeaux. Goujon replaced Chouly at No 8 during the Six Nations on account of his greater dynamism and ball-carrying impact, but PSA has always been an admirer of Chouly’s set-piece work and he has been France’s line-out organizer for much of his reign.So have PSA and Yannick Bru, France’s forwards’ coach, decided to shift Chouly to the flank – where he usually plays for Clermont – to accommodate Goujon? That would mean no place for Bernard Le Roux, the Racing flanker who has been a regular starter in the last couple of seasons but who is among the 11 left in Paris. Intriguingly, Midi Olympique claims that Le Roux could be paired in second row alongside Sebastien Vahaamahina for the return match on Saturday week. The 6ft 4in and 17 stone Le Roux has the physique for the second-row and his presence in the engine room would also give France some much-needed athleticism in a position where, compared to other nations, they have a shortage of big men with explosive power and pace to boot.Back in vogue: Louis Picamoles (centre) has been training hard to get back into shapeWith Chouly also omitted from Saturday’s match the back-row will probably comprise Fulgence Ouedraogo, Yannick Nyanga and Louis Picamoles none of whom have featured much for France in the last two seasons. At least one of the trio won’t make the final cut but it’s unlikely to be the giant Toulouse No 8. Picamoles has endured a tough 12 months, laid low this time last year by a lung infection that impaired his performance for months. It wasn’t until the spring that he began to recover his fitness, and with it his form, and reports indicate that six weeks of intensive training have done wonders for the 29-year-old. Picamoles is stereotypically French; not one of life’s natural trainers, the hothouse environment of a World Cup training camp has focused his mind and enabled him to train well, eat well and feel well. For Picamoles, like so many of his countrymen, is a player who performs best when his confidence is high. Philippe Saint-Andre will bring his French squad to Twickenham with a likely experimental side, where time is running out for a glut of playerscenter_img Behind enemy lines: France will meet a familiar adversary on Saturday evening Elsewhere only Benjamin Kayser and Eddy Ben Arous of the front row union don’t make the trip to Paris but if recent training sessions are anything to go by, Nicolas Mas, Guilhem Guirado and Vincent Debaty will start against Italy. In the back three, Scott Spedding looks nailed down at full-back with reports suggesting that PSA will play the Racing 15, Brice Dulin, on the wing in one of the warm-up matches to see how he goes.Nailed on: Philippe Saint-Andre looks to keep faith with Scott Spedding at No 15As for the centre combination, England debutant Sam Burgess can at least rest easy that he won’t have to deal with the different threats posed by Wesley Fofana and Mathieu Bastareaud. But Gael Fickou, Rémi Lamerat and Alexandre Dumoulin are all fine footballers, their senses sharpened by the knowledge that one of the five players to be axed from the current squad later this month will be one of them. They’re playing for their places, as is Burgess, just one more reason why Saturday’s clash will be anything but a Crunch ‘amical’last_img read more

Five things we learnt in rugby in January

Five things we learnt in rugby in January

first_img Red alert: Tadhg Beirne scores for Scarlets against Bath. Photo: Getty Images We’re a month into 2018 and Paul Williams pinpoints what we’ve learnt in the year so far, from scrums to Super Rugby and full-backs to flawed cups You can still have a non-linear career in rugby unionSince rugby has turned professional, careers have become very linear. Academies and a vast array of age-grade rugby have meant a steady progression through the ranks is often the only way to progress. Academy placement is followed by U20 representation and next it’s senior club rugby then Test rugby. The effectiveness of the professional process usually mean the weaker players are sifted out early on, meaning there are few bolters or surprise packages for supporters to discover at senior level.But the rise of Tadhg Beirne is disproving this theory. And he is not alone. Look at another Scarlet in Hadleigh Parkes. Neither has taken the fluid route to success. Parkes was considered, very unfairly, a journeyman pro – if he is a journeyman then he must rank alongside Marco Polo and Vasco Da Gama such has been his ability to help the Scarlets discover new lands; Champions Cup quarter-finals are rare possessions indeed in Wales. Beirne’s form since arriving from Ireland has been nothing short of remarkable. Having been rejected by Leinster, he has arguably been the best player in Europe this season.While professional rugby will continue to produce the golden children who are predisposed to getting 100 caps for their country before the egg has fused in their mother’s womb, such as Marcus Smith, there is still room for the late developer and those who catch a lucky break. And long may it continue, the game would be a very sterile environment without it.The scrum’s importance goes beyond the obviousJanuary saw Eddie Jones reiterate the importance of the scrum. As he said, without it the game would become “rugby league with lineouts”. But the importance of the scrum far exceeds its primary purpose. Without a competitive scrum, the physical make-up of a team would be vastly different and the implications far reaching.Key facet: Ali Price prepares to put the ball in at a scrum. Photo: Getty ImagesLess focus on the scrum means less need for 19st players who wouldn’t look out of place as extras in Lord of the Rings. In the front row, 19st props are obviously vital but they can be a liability in the defensive line, especially after ten-plus phases. A move away from an authentic scrum would lead to front-row forwards replicating the build of back-row forwards, making the already nano-defensive gaps even smaller.Having extra, lighter forwards would also have an impact on lineout success, where the ability to potentially lift five jumpers would undoubtedly see the quality of lineout ball drop. We all get annoyed with constant scrum resets and unfathomable scrum penalties, but be careful what you wish for. Without scrums, rugby union would be like watching two pieces of flesh sandpaper rubbing against each other for 80 minutes.The ‘old guard’ full-backs need to step asideIt’s never easy criticising once fantastic Test players. Leigh Halfpenny, Rob Kearney and Mike Brown have had tremendous international careers and their distinguished club careers will undoubtedly continue. But eventually even the timeless run out of minutes. This year’s Six Nations could be the year in which that finally happens.Race is on: Should Mike Brown or Anthony Watson wear No 15 for England? Photo: Getty ImagesAll things being equal, January has proved that February needs to be the month where the likes of Jordan Larmour, a fit Liam Williams and Anthony Watson need to wear the No 15 shirts for their countries. To their credit, the wonderfully expansive Scotland were way ahead of the curve by selecting Stuart Hogg. Moving on: All Black Lima Sopoaga is joining Wasps next season. Photo: Getty ImagesThe plundering of a poorer professional team, in any sport, by a richer professional team is nothing new and arguably progresses the commercial interests of the game. But Super Rugby isn’t just another league; it’s almost a subsection of a rugby, nearly a different sport. It is snowboarding, to the northern hemisphere’s ‘downhill’. It’s not as if those former Super Rugby players are even allowed to continue to play that style in the northern hemisphere – they aren’t. Barring a few teams, the relegation and commercial pressures of the Top 14 and Premiership aren’t the ideal conditions for Super-style rugby.Many don’t share the love for Super Rugby. But for others it is a break from the attritional rugby played up north and a heads-up as to what form New Zealand rugby, in particular, is about to morph into next. The aesthetic of the global game will suffer should Super Rugby be stripped to its bones.center_img FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREIt’s not merely a debate about age. Kearney, Brown and Halfpenny excelled in an age where it was easier to win games when you didn’t have the ball, such was the ease with which you could win penalties at the breakdown. The kick-chase game from 2009-2015 favoured those who were strong in the air and missed few tackles, over those who stepped and broke lines. But that style of full-back went out of fashion two seasons ago, particularly in the southern hemisphere, and now it is time that the north caught up.The Anglo-Welsh Cup needs a rethinkJanuary yet again saw the Anglo-Welsh Cup cough up some unsightly mismatches. For a competition that is supposed to be about developing young talent, there are some players being selected with more caps than Jay-Z. On occasion, it has looked like watching a competitive dad have a kickabout with his toddler, only to take it too seriously and end up tackling his kid into the tree swing.The Gloucester team that faced the Ospreys featured Henry Trinder, Richard Hibbard, Ed Slater and Ben Morgan, while the Ospreys included four players I had never seen before, and I watch an OCD level of rugby.Cherry pick: Ben Morgan takes on the Ospreys last month. Photo: Getty ImagesIt may be that the English teams simply have deeper squads filled with more senior players and that their second-string teams are stronger. Or that the Premiership teams are using it to keep their squads warm during international breaks in a league where relegation means that the end of the season is just as important as the beginning – not a situation that prevails in the Pro14.Either way the competition needs reform. An age limit on the players selected seems logical. But perhaps a more unusual measure of success could come from giving additional rewards to those clubs who manage to transition younger players who feature in the competition, into their long-term first-team squads.Rugby needs Super Rugby January once again saw the pull of European money impact on Super Rugby. Highlanders fly-half Lima Sopoaga, Charlie Ngatai, the Chiefs centre, and Hurricanes coach Chris Boyd are the latest to sign contracts in the northern hemisphere. It is a difficult situation. Who can blame players for wanting to take care of their families? But the plundering of Super Rugby could have more far-ranging consequences than merely draining other teams of talent. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Church builds community through post-Sandy relief work

Church builds community through post-Sandy relief work

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Sharon SheridanPosted Nov 19, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Church builds community through post-Sandy relief work This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] “This was the church at its best.”The words surfaced again and again as Episcopalians described how their churches became distribution centers for relief supplies and sanctuaries of warmth and food in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, which slammed the Northeast on Oct. 29. The storm swept away or flooded homes along the coasts of New Jersey and New York, disrupted transportation and telephone services across the region and left millions of households without electricity and heat, and in some cases water, throughout multiple dioceses.Churches responded by opening their doors as warming, charging and feeding stations; collecting and distributing emergency supplies and meals; and dispatching volunteers to visit and inventory the needs of those most affected by the storm. In the process, their clergy reported, the churches offered new opportunities for service and built community within and beyond their walls.“The community-building is amazing,” said the Rev. Michael Sniffen, rector of the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York, in the Diocese of Long Island. “A lot of the volunteers have been coming back day after day, so we’re all getting to know one another.”The Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York, serves as a “holy warehouse” for Hurricane Sandy relief supplies. Each day, the church is filled with and then emptied of donations distributed to storm victims. More than 20,000 volunteers have helped with the effort, which has received hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of donations. Photo/Michael SniffenSt. Luke and St. Matthew opened its buildings, including the church itself, to relief efforts, particularly Occupy Sandy, which harnessed the organization and volunteer power of Occupy Wall Street. Along with a slightly smaller operation at St. Jacobi Evangelical Lutheran Church in Sunset Park, the parish became “basically the major drop-off and distribution hub and volunteer-training hub for Brooklyn,” Sniffen told ENS.By Nov. 12, more than 20,000 volunteers and hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of donations had come through the church’s doors. “We have six to nine full UPS trucks that come and drop off [donations] at the church every day,” Sniffen said.Volunteers canvas storm-affected neighborhoods, determine what’s needed, then distribute the relief supplies that have been sorted and organized in the church’s pews. To solicit the specific donations needed, Occupy Sandy uses an Amazon wedding registry. A kitchen crew provides 5,000 to 8,000 hot meals a day.Children from New York Public School 29 run the “coat check” station for Occupy Sandy volunteers at the Episcopal Church of St. Luke and St. Matthew in Brooklyn, New York. Photo/Michael SniffenNew-volunteer orientation happens every 15 minutes. Volunteers of all ages participate, including students from Public School 29 who spent their Veterans Day holiday running the “coat check” in the church balcony.One volunteer told Sniffen she hadn’t attended church in more than a decade. “This renews my faith in what the church can be,” she said.An electrician from Milwaukee, in town to babysit his grandchildren for a few days, helped install a generator at a church without electricity, explaining, “I thought I could be useful.”Another man, visiting New York from Barcelona, Spain, spent a day sorting donations at the church.“Those are just three stories. It’s an image of human community,” Sniffen said, noting that volunteers come “from every religious background, and none.”“I think the fact that this effort is housed in a church speaks for itself,” he said. “What’s amazing is the number of volunteers who come up to me and say, ‘Thank you so much for opening up this church.’ … I just keep telling folks: This is what the church is for.”Members of a wide variety of churches and other community groups helped prepare meals at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown, New Jersey, for the 10 days it served as a post-Sandy warming, charging and feeding station. On the last night, dinner was prepared by members of Market Street Mission, a nondenominational organization that offers a residential recovery program for men as well as emergency services for the community’s needy. Photo/Sharon SheridanAt St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Morristown, New Jersey, which served more than 3,000 meals over 10 days to people left without electricity after the storm, cooking allowed people of many backgrounds from the wider community to work together for a common purpose, noted the Rev. Janet Broderick, rector.“It was possible for people of so many different minds, of theologies and thoughts about God, to just work side by side,” she said. “It brought out the best in folks.”Besides hosting meals, the parish hall served as a warming and charging station each day. At the tables, one could find a homeless person, used to living “on the edge,” holding a discussion “with someone who is probably a multi-millionaire with no [electricity],” said the Rev. Melissa Hall, assistant rector. “We had the Antioch table here.”“We worry about budgets. We worry about stewardship. We worry about bulletins … and this was the great leveler,” she said. What became vital was: “Do we have enough sauce? How much spaghetti do we need to make for 150 people?”When Hurricane Sandy disrupted mass transit and telephone service in New York, Diocese of New York Bishop Coadjutor Andrew Dietsche rode his bicycle from the Cathedral of St. John the Divine to lower Manhattan to check on parishes he had been unable to reach. Photo/Tomas ReimerChurches are perfectly poised to help in a disaster like this, said Diocese of New York Bishop Coadjutor Andrew Dietsche.“A lot of other agencies sort of show up from outside when disasters happen, and usually show up with more resources. But what we have is places on the ground … and already-existing ties to the community,” he said. “Especially in the Episcopal Church, we don’t tend to be a mega-church model. We’re a parish model. We have a church in every community, and we’re community-based. We know the people. We have those networks.“It’s practical, but it’s also completely consistent in the gospel call that we follow as well: to love our neighbors.”Congregations throughout the 200-church diocese have been following that call since the hurricane hit.“Really, all of the churches in our diocese are reaching out in different ways,” Dietsche said. “The churches in lower Manhattan have been reaching out into their communities with relief for the people who live in the neighborhoods of their churches.”Among those churches, St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in-the-Bowery served as a major relief-distribution center. North of the city, St. Stephen’s in Pearl River in Rockland County and St. Peter’s in Peekskill in Westchester County served a similar role in areas that escaped flooding but suffered massive power outages, he said.While the storm damaged some churches, “generally the damage was moderate, and it’s all fixable,” and none prevented them from holding worship services, he said. The worst-hit area in the diocese was Staten Island, where some parishioners lost homes. In one case, a mother and daughter both had their homes condemned because of storm damage.“I’m not quite sure yet what we will be able to do for people whose whole homes are gone,” Dietsche said. “We have to sort of assess what role we can play.”As the need transitions from immediate emergency relief to longer-term rebuilding, Dietsche said he anticipated one of the diocese’s best resources for developing strategies to meet that need would be its new disaster response coordinator, the Rev. Stephen Harding. “He has brought great leadership to this.”The areas of the diocese severely damaged by the storm are on a smaller scale than in the surrounding dioceses of New Jersey, Newark and Long Island, Dietsche noted. He’d like to see networks develop across the dioceses to move forward in the rebuilding state, although he doesn’t know what shape that will take yet, he said.In the Diocese of New Jersey, the hurricane left nine clergy as well as some parishioners homeless, said the Rev. Francis Hubbard, interim rector at Christ Episcopal Church in New Brunswick. The parish has served as a regional depot for area churches sending supplies to the hard-hit Jersey Shore. It also geared up for a larger-than-average distribution of supplies at its regular local food pantry.The storm knocked out the church’s telephone, and Hubbard’s cell service was spotty for several days. Once his cell phone was working properly, “I went through the parish directly and started making phone calls to everybody who had been hospitalized in the last year and any elderly people, if I could reach them.”Some people he reached had no power or heat, but downed power lines and trees made reaching them difficult. He began searching for other parishioners who lived nearby who could help, and “a lot of people started reaching out themselves to people that they knew,” Hubbard said, adding that he thinks this strengthened the bonds among members.“I think that this can build community, and I think it also tells you how much we need community. There’s a great sin of over-individualism in America, that we’re tough and everybody can make it on their own, and that’s bogus,” he said. “Jesus didn’t say, ‘Believe in me and never hang out with anyone else who does.’ It’s interdependence, not dependence.”In the Diocese of Newark, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Montclair stayed open as a warming and charging station 12 hours a day for two weeks and now employs an “eat, pray, love” strategy for its post-Sandy efforts: getting nonperishable foods to storm victims in Hoboken or through Occupy Sandy; praying for those traumatized by the storm; and loving through giving, encouraging donations to Episcopal Relief and Development, said the Rev. John Mennell, rector.“It was an amazing couple of weeks of ministry,” he said. “It was just so wonderful to see people that giving and that open. I always think that when tragedy and stuff like this strikes, God finds some way to show us God’s best.”“The folks that came in were incredibly grateful,” he said, adding, “Some of the folks were among 19 visitors at church on Sunday.”Through watching the community come together in service, Broderick discovered something about what draws people to God and the church.“I always thought that if people could understand that God loves them exactly as they are, then they would find church irresistible and the church would grow, lots of people would come. And I’m disappointed that that doesn’t always work,” she said. “I discovered from this … people need an opportunity to give themselves to serve.”“It’s an aspect of worship … giving oneself in a real and serious sacrificial way,” she said. “It’s really an aspect of being crucified with Christ. That’s really what we’re talking about … being a person who gives selflessly as Christ did. I think people need that experience in order to connect with the church in a real way. I think that’s what I noticed that I have not provided for in my ministry as much as I really want to provide for it now.”Said Dietsche, “The kind of relief work that we do … is very much the work of the gospel … a fulfillment of our commitment to live life as disciples.”And it changes people’s perception of the church, Hall said, from something “ancient and archaic” to one “really relevant and able to stand in a modern world in an important way with a very simple message, which is: The table is for everyone; everyone is welcome.”“I think it was eye-opening for people to see it in action,” she said. “To me, that was the most amazing piece, in that people who don’t believe in God, who don’t believe in organized religion, who call themselves spiritual but not religious – that all of a sudden they realized that … the church is a way to connect in a loving and inclusive and important manner with something bigger than ourselves.“I think what happened was that people experienced grace,” she said. “I’m very proud of my church.”Episcopal Relief & Development is working with leaders from affected dioceses as they mobilize local resources and reach out to those hardest hit. Details about how to contribute to Sandy relief efforts through Episcopal Relief & Development are available here and related updates from the agency are being posted here.— Sharon Sheridan is an ENS correspondent. Hurricane Sandy Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Relief & Development, Rector Albany, NY Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration

Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 14, 2013 at 8:18 am I am sure that conferences like this have a useful purpose beyond the grandiose plans and overarching agreements that seem to have been reached once again regarding the provision of health services for the Haitian people. What is needed is practical implementation of actual health care services. Such information was provided by Hugh Davies and his team from the Middleham & St. Peter’s Episcopal Church (Lusby, MD) with the La Resurrection School Nurse project that has now been in place for two years providing daily health care and education for the students at that school. I don’t even see this mentioned in this “core principles” article. We do not need more conferences like this; what we do need is the actual delivery of health care and education in our schools now. Just as that being provided at La Resurrection School. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Dan Tootle says: Rector Albany, NY Richard C Ellis says: Haiti Medical Missions, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration Meeting brings together Haitians, Americans to listen to, learn from each other Tags September 16, 2013 at 12:19 am Me too…I need to be better connected. I work in Ouanaminthe, Haiti on the border with the DR. Next Medical Mission is Jan. 23rd 2014. Leave from the Rocky Mountains to Dallas into Miami and then through Porta Plata, DR. We cross at Dajabon, DR for Ouanaminthe. All are welcome! Rosemari Sullivan says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ October 15, 2013 at 7:35 pm Our Kansas City Foundation supports a birthing center in rural Haiti which is a ministry of the Episcopal Church of Haiti. The foundation partners with several Episcopal churches in Kansas City and around the country, and our ongoing (since 2004) operations definitely follow the core principles listed above. How can we participate with you? We would love to be in contact. Our local Haitian staff functions autonomously, while we provide financial support, but we would love to continue a dialogue about sustainability. Looking forward to hearing from you!Dr. Betsy Wickstrom Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 13, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Dr. Betsy Wickstrom says: AliceMarie Slaven-Emond says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Among the questions discussed by the attendees was how to define “sustainability” and how they try to apply the concept to the work they do in Haiti.James Ingvoldstad, an obstetrician/gynecologist who has worked for 12 years with La Gonâve Haiti Partnership, said his understanding of sustainability has changed over those years.“My first thought was: Go in, teach people how to do stuff, teach them how to fish, leave and then they can fish,” he said. “I’ve discovered that isn’t very possible in Haiti at this particular time. I realized that we’re a little bit naïve and maybe pompous to think that could exist when you look at …non-profit hospitals in the United States [which] could not operate on patient revenues. They all have huge endowments. That’s their sustainability.”Ingvoldstad said he knows that sustainability is not “somebody with a big bucket of money coming down there every other year because that’s going to fade away; you get tired, you get burned out.”Perhaps, he said, corporate investment with accompanying corporate investment in Haiti’s basic needs ought to be fostered.[A video of the Rev. Kesner Ajax, Diocese of Haiti partnership coordinator, explaining to the gathering why the La Gonâve Haiti Partnership works so well, is here.]Another element in forging sustainable programs “comes from the relationships that you form,” said Bob Sloane, a doctor who manages the guest house for mission trips to Hôpital Sainte Croix (Holy Cross Hospital) in Léogâne.“It’s not only the teaching-the-person-to-fish element but, enabling that person, empowering that person and building the kind of trust … so that if you’re removed from the equation, that person is still empowered on-site, has initiative … and can sustain themselves to a certain degree,” he said.Referencing Ingvoldstad’s concern about organizers getting burned out, Sloane also suggested that “transition leadership” has to be part of any mission plan, “so that there is a next generation that has the same passion.”Hilda Alcindor, dean of the FSIL School of Nursing in Léogâne, said creating sustainability means having a long-term plan.“You just don’t come and say ‘Oh, those poor people; gotta do something for Haiti,’” she said, adding that money spent for those kind of trips is ultimately wasted.One of the goals of sustainability, she said, must be empowerment.“We need to teach the Haitian people how to take care of themselves. It’s not for you to come and be the boss,” Alcindor said, adding that mission trip participants must work side by side with the Haitians.“We do count. We’re in-country. We know what’s going on,” she said. “Don’t come and tell us what to do. Share with us what we need to do. That’s going to be sustainability when you share with us. We tell you, you tell us and then together we come with a plan. You don’t come with your plan and impose it; it’s not going to be sustainable.”The Rev. C.J. Van Slyke, a nurse and a deacon in the Diocese of Alabama involved with that diocese’s companion relationship with Haiti, said that participants have been learning to talk with their Haitian partners about what they want and need, and what they could do.“We’ve learned over the years how much more effective and meaningful it is if you can respect and keep developing those relationships and working from within,” rather than simply coming into Haiti with preconceived ideas, she said.[ooyala code=”JmYzVpZTqDHWJH6VieLJ2WlNGt6Kb9VA” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″] This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 15, 2013 at 12:10 pm How do people get invited or become aware of such a conference? St Stephen’s and other parishes in the Diocese of East Tennessee are working with the Children’s Nutrition Program and others in the rural areas around Leogane. A current additional initiative is starting a permanent walk-in type clinic in the mountains in a community we have been partnering with since mid 1990s. We are now in process of establishing operational protocols and pharmaceutical lists that are acceptable to Haiti. Had we known about this conference we may have been able to attend.Perhaps if Mr Tootle had been invited he could have felt a part of the efforts rather than just throwing darts at it.Several month ago, someone introducing himself as from the Episcopal Church asked for my contact information. He said was assembling an information database of efforts underway for Haiti. Nothing has come of that, apparently no information was shared. It seems there continues to be a disconnect. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service – Miami, Florida] An ecumenical group of people involved in medical missions to Haiti has offered colleagues in the Episcopal Church and beyond a set of “core principles” that ought to guide those efforts.“With the common goal to stimulate growth and sustainability of accessible quality health care in Haiti, we believe these core principles to be essential and covenant in this collaborative effort to apply them in the development and implementation of all Haiti Partnership Program medical mission efforts,” those attending the Sept. 6-7 Haiti Medical Missions Best Practices Symposium at the Miami Airport Marriott said in a “covenant statement” they released after the meeting.The partnership program is an effort of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti to coordinate and facilitate the desire of Episcopalians outside of Haiti to come to the diocese on mission trips.The attendees’ covenant statement said all organizers of mission trips should develop a partnership agreement that include:Performing a community assessment that would document community resources, identify needs, listen to what the community wants, what current initiatives are in place, needs and history of other missions.Developing a plan for sustainability, which the statement describes as “empowerment of the community through partner (Haitian and American) accountability, trust, honesty, and commitment with the ultimate goal of ‘It will be there when I am gone.’”Forging a medical mission-to-recipient partnership that will be a community-to-community effort of people working side-by-side.Coordinating and communicating about resources between medical mission organizations and with Haitian organizations, as well as paying attention to scheduling of trips and identified needs to be served.Clearly defining the intent of the mission, including having measurable goals.Developing and implementing ways to evaluate outcomes and assess what is accomplished.The Rev. Frantz Cassesus, Diocese of Haiti canon to the ordinary, who attended the symposium, has reviewed the covenant statement with Bishop of Haiti Jean Zaché Duracin, and the bishop is pleased with the work initiated at the symposium, the Rev. Clelia P. Garrity of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, Florida, told ENS.[ooyala code=”h2YTJoZTpRxISMnGH-XwYa88cduAypm8″ player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″] Featured Events Comments (6) Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Haiti, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rosemari Sullivan says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Health & Healthcare In his keynote address Sikumbuzo Vundla, the diocese’s chief operating officer, called for partnerships in Haiti to be based on mutual trust and respect and include “regular and frank discussions” about the course of the relationship and the work involved.“Our resources in Haiti are challenging,” he said, adding that the diocese is still trying to rebuild its resources after the 2010 earthquake, and it will continue to need resources from outside the country. However, he said, partnerships where all the resources come from outside the diocese can be lopsided. And so the diocese is trying be “more responsible and more responsive and take more ownership of the programs that we’re doing, and trying to contribute more from within.”“People in partnerships must trust one another and the Diocese of Haiti will be working on that trust, building that trust, rebranding ourselves, if you like,” he said. “We have seen from our own experience that lack of trust in many cases has led to miscommunication.”Vundla said “partners should be accountable to each other” and to the recipients of their efforts, and partnership should be based on a business model “in terms of commitment and time.”“Too often partnerships fall because people do not take the time to make them work,” he said. “That is why we are saying [that] in the Diocese of Haiti it is not business as usual. We are taking every precaution, every measure, to ensure that our partnerships continue to improve, continue to strive for the benefit of the beneficiaries and those give us the resources to serve the people of Haiti.”Both Alcindor and Frantz Large, president of the Haitian Society of Opthamology, cautioned against encouraging what they called the “beggar mentality” that exists in Haiti.“You get there,” Alcindor told the attendees, “you give them everything. They need to give you something. Stop giving for free.”Holding her upturned hands out in front of her, Alcindor said “stop keeping my hands like that … I want to hold my hands down … I want to be proud, with my head up.”Haitians living outside of Haiti, who are known as the Haitian diaspora, are not involved enough in helping their birth country “because we were never taught how to serve; it is a cultural thing so we need to teach the children to serve, how to help out,” she added.Large said some people who could pay for medical services instead come to free clinics, thus making it difficult for Haitian medical professionals to make a living.Large and Alcindor called for mission trips that include teaching and training components so that Haitians can learn best medical practices. And, Large and others said, mission teams need to be willing to coordinate their trips to serve the needs of recipients best, based both on their location and their illnesses.Ingvoldstad said he once asked Alcindor to send a nursing school graduate to help on La Gonâve. She told him to send her someone from La Gonâve to studying nursing and she would send that person back to the Haitian island.“I said: ‘Oh, this is a nice lesson. I was a beggar and she made me be a participant,’” Ingvoldstad said.The conference was sponsored by Grey Dove Inc., whose goal is to stimulate the wellbeing and sustainability of communities throughout the world by providing primary and specialized medical care and prevention education. Garrity founded Grey Dove and she is also president of the board of directors of the South Florida Haiti Project and coordinator of Esther’s Voice, a human trafficking awareness initiative in South Florida.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 18, 2013 at 2:08 pm We look forward to connecting with you. As I mentioned above to Mr. Ellis, we are working at making as many connections as possible and collaborating on best practices. Please be in touch with Clelia Garrity at [email protected] September 18, 2013 at 2:04 pm Mr Elis,Thank you for your response. First, the person who contacted you was from The Church Center and the Development Office there. He has done an incredible job of developing a database of Episcopal Churches involved in Haiti. The Development office just shared the “medical” contacts with Rev. Garrity yesterday so we are hoping to expand our contacts with this very important wider group as soon as possible. In planning the symposium, Clelia Garrity reached out to all those known to her at the time. We will definitely continue to build on this. Please be directly in touch with Clelia at [email protected] We would be value your experience and do our best to connect. Rosemari Sullivan Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Fallece Onell A. Soto, quien fuera Obispo de Venezuela

Fallece Onell A. Soto, quien fuera Obispo de Venezuela

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem People Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Posted Aug 14, 2015 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Jobs & Calls AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Job Listing Fallece Onell A. Soto, quien fuera Obispo de Venezuela This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Obituary, Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME [7 de agosto de 2015] El Rvdmo. Onell A. Soto, quien fuera obispo anglicano de Venezuela y obispo auxiliar de las diócesis episcopales de Atlanta y Alabama, falleció el pasado 5 de agosto a los 82 años de edad.El obispo Soto se esforzó en propagar el amor de Dios a través de todas las facetas de su vida, ya fuese como periodista, ministro, líder, mentor y hombre de familia. Fue un pionero de la transmisión de noticias breves antes que Twitter, se empeñó en que la Iglesia de Venezuela se convirtiera en una Iglesia nacional y nunca dejó de compartir su contagioso sentido del humor.Soto nació el 17 de noviembre de 1932 en Omaja, Cuba, hijo de Juan Soto Vega y María Almaguer Mayo. Luego de pasar su niñez en San Agustín y Matanzas, inició sus estudios de medicina en la Universidad de La Habana hasta que esta casa de estudios cerró por razones políticas en 1956. En 1957, salió de Cuba hacia Estados Unidos donde se matriculó en la Escuela de Medicina de la Universidad de Boston. Luego de regresar a La Habana, se casó con Nina Ulloa, directora de Educación Cristiana de la Iglesia Episcopal, en 1960. La pareja salió de Cuba poco después huyéndole al régimen de Castro y él se matriculó en la Escuela de Teología de la Universidad del Sur, enSewanee, donde obtuvo una licenciatura en teología. Fue ordenado al presbiterado en Bogotá, Colombia, en 1965 y comenzó una nueva vida como misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal.El amor de Onell y Nina por la Iglesia y su profunda fe y sentido de la evangelización, orientaron la labor de ambos como misioneros. Él dirigió una parroquia en Ecuador y sirvió como secretario ejecutivo de la IX Provincia de la Iglesia Episcopal mientras residía con su familia en El Salvador. Al regresar a Estados Unidos a fines de los años setenta, se desempeñó como encargado de Información y Educación de la Misión Mundial de la Iglesia Episcopal, con sede en la ciudad de Nueva York.En 1987, fue electo obispo anglicano de Venezuela, donde sirvió hasta 1995 y donde le otorgaron la Orden del Libertador Simón Bolívar, la más alta condecoración civil que concede esa nación, por sus contribuciones al bienestar moral y espiritual de Venezuela. Posteriormente, lo nombraron obispo auxiliar de la Diócesis de Atlanta y, en 1999, obispo auxiliar de la Diócesis de Alabama. En 2002, se jubiló y se mudó con Nina a Miami.Soto trabajó incansablemente por la expansión misionera de la Iglesia Episcopal a través de América Latina y el mundo. Fue un talentoso comunicador que entendió el poder de los medios de difusión para expandir el ecumenismo y la evangelización. Antes de la era del Internet, fue pionero del desarrollo y la distribución de la palabra y la misión de la Iglesia mediante noticias breves. Comenzó con el boletín Rápidas en 1971 y continuó con varias otras publicaciones hasta que, después de jubilado, se convirtió en el redactor de Rapidísimas, un noticiario que circulaba en varios periódicos digitales (Episcopal News Service entre ellos), hasta casi el fin de su vida. Además, durante 25 años ayudó a Nina a editar Día a día, la versión en español de Forward Day by Day, el devocionario diario de la Iglesia Episcopal.Fue esposo y padre amoroso, y un infatigable defensor de otras personas. Poseía un chispeante sentido del humor y un auténtico amor por todo lo cubano.A Soto lo sobreviven su esposa, Nina, con quien estuvo casado 55 años, sus hijos y los cónyuges de estos: Ana María Soto y Gerardo Cárdena, Lidia Soto-Harmon y Robert Harmon, Onell y Robin Soto y Elena Soto-Chapa y Santiago Chapa; y sus seis nietos: Tomás y Nina Harmon, Susana Cárdenas-Soto, y Cristina, Alicia y Lucas Chapa.Se celebro un oficio de honras fúnebres en la tarde del 8 de agosto en la iglesia episcopal de San Cristóbal [St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church] en Oak Park, Illinois.Y se celebrará un oficio de recordación el 5 de septiembre, a las 4:00 P.M., en la iglesia del Espíritu Santo [Holy Comforter] en Miami.La familia ha pedido que en lugar de flores, se envíen donaciones a la iglesia del Holy Comforter, 1300 SW 1st Street, Miami, FL 33135Pueden enviarse cartas de condolencia a la Sra. Nina Soto a su dirección de 3350 Torrremolinos, Doral, FL 33178. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit an Event Listing Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

Remembering Jonathan Daniels: Complete coverage

Remembering Jonathan Daniels: Complete coverage

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Servicecenter_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remembering Jonathan Daniels: Complete coverage TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Jonathan Daniels Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted Aug 28, 2015 Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AKlast_img read more

Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected

Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Marriage Equality Rector Smithfield, NC Canada: ‘Civil disobedience’ may arise if gay marriage rejected  April 13, 2016 at 5:46 pm Hill is a smart cleric. The church will lose on both sides;however, the hurt will be felt worse on the lgbt more due to the years of harsh discrimination. In the end, you will lose their souls to churches with open souls and hearts following Jesus’ words and commands of full acceptance and love of all In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 14, 2016 at 9:47 am Shame on the Canadian church. McKinley Walker says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 25, 2016 at 12:45 am Ordained people are also subject to the baptismal vows..———————————————————————————–“Celebrant Will you strive for justice and peace among allpeople, and respect the dignity of every humanbeing?People I will, with God’s help. “ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI MaryLou Scherer says: Submit an Event Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Tampa, FL Frank Riggio-Preston says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release John Horne says: Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC center_img By Tali FolkinsPosted Apr 13, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME MaryLou Scherer says: Rector Knoxville, TN New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA MaryLou Scherer says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Comments are closed. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 25, 2016 at 12:41 am Shame on the bishops, they are the ones obstructing the change in the marriage canon, the lay members of synod are supporting the change and the full inclusion of the LGBT community Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 20, 2016 at 12:28 pm An amendment to the canon is just the start of full inclusion of LGBT people. As a gay member of TEC, my Diocese has yet to fully accept or implement the amended canons of TEC. I can say from experience that until every Bishop of TEC fully accepts LGBT people full inclusion will not be achieved. My very modest advice to the Church in Canada would be to take the first step of inclusion. Unfortunately, this isn’t end of the struggle. To say that rejection would alienate or hurt LGBT people is an understatement. It may well be another twenty years before TEC is in a position of full inclusion. The Bishops that disagree or have concerns regarding full inclusion will not be moved to change anything in their Diocese. I know this from experience. Bishops in disagreement with the modified canon or proposed modified canon as with the Church Of Canada are more respected than by the structure of the Church than the oppressed community. It seems we have more compassion for Bishops in disagreement with the Church than the very people the national Church is trying to help. From my perspective, I can only hope and pray our next Bishop wants to embrace the national Church and the LGBT community. The struggle continues parish by parish and diocese by diocese.My hopes and prayers go out to the Church Of Canada for full inclusion of LGBT people as well as for improved acceptance in TEC by all Bishops. Isn’t it simple that we are all gifts from God and loved by God. Anglican Communion, April 25, 2016 at 10:43 am The United Church of Canada has had its doors wide-open for the LGBT community The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments (6) Rector Bath, NC Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem “We’re mindful of our need to reach out to those who are going to be hurt or offended by a decision of General Synod,” says Archbishop Fred Hiltz. Photo: Tali Folkins[Anglican Journal] Some bishops have expressed concern about the possibility that some priests may go ahead and marry gay couples in the event that a resolution changing the marriage canon to allow same-gender marriages is rejected at General Synod this summer, said Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.“If it’s not approved, then, as we sometimes, say…there could be some ‘civil disobedience’ on the part of clergy and parishes, and the bishops are going to have to handle that, because all of us that are ordained make a solemn promise to conform to the doctrine, discipline and worship of the Anglican Church of Canada,” Hiltz told the Anglican Journal April 12. Hiltz made the comments during an interview on the House of Bishops meeting last week, April 4–8.Asked to clarify if by “civil disobedience” he meant same-gender marriages in defiance of a “no” vote, Hiltz replied, “That’s a possibility. Bishops are aware of that. We’re mindful of our need to reach out to those who are going to be hurt or offended by a decision of General Synod.”Whatever the outcome of the vote at the meeting July 7–12, Hiltz said, the bishops need to be aware that the church risks losing members who may be incensed to the point of leaving. Bishops may decide to hold “post-General Synod” gatherings, which would enable people to “express what they need to express and consider how we continue to walk together,” he said.“We have to be mindful that if it gets approved on first reading, there may be some clergy and parishes that may say, ‘That’s it—we don’t think we can be part of this church anymore.’ That’s a possibility,” he said.“If it’s not approved, there could be people that will say that, too. I’ve had some correspondence of that nature lately.“We’re all going into this synod knowing there will be pastoral implications no matter which way this vote goes, and every single bishop in our church has to deal with those pastoral implications,” he said.“I know it’s difficult for people to hear me say this, but…if it doesn’t pass, the LGBT community is going to be deeply upset—if not, in fact, deeply offended,” Hiltz added. “And we will have to seize that as a challenge and an opportunity as a church to be, I think, much more deeply engaged with them in terms of their lived experience of their lived covenantal love one for another.”To pass its first reading at General Synod this July, the resolution to allow same-sex marriages needs a two-thirds majority from all three orders—bishops, clergy and laity. On February 29, the House of Bishops announced that they were unlikely to get the needed two-thirds majority. Hiltz later told the Journal that he believed roughly a third of the church’s bishops were in favour, a third were opposed and another third were struggling with the issue.Today, with about three months before General Synod, Hiltz suggested this still seemed to be the case.“My own read…is that notwithstanding all the work that we’ve done in this triennium around the same-sex marriage issue and this resolution—I don’t actually see that very many of the bishops have kind of moved in their position,” he said. “Overall, a lot of the positions of the bishops for or against same-sex marriage in our church haven’t really changed.”Although some bishops have suggested the possibility of other options beyond a vote simply in favour or opposed to changing the marriage canon, Hiltz said no clear consensus on any such option emerged out of last week’s House of Bishops meeting.“There’s an appetite for saying, ‘Well, if we don’t amend the canon, how do we pastorally care for gay and lesbian people in our church?’ Hiltz said. “So that’s a conversation, I think, that’s continuing—it’s not one that can be rushed” in the form of a proposal, for example, for General Synod to consider this July from the House of Bishops, he said.“We’re not anywhere near that. But my sense is that conversation is probably going to continue past General Synod.”The Anglican Journal also spoke with Bishop Larry Robertson, of the diocese of Yukon, who said he found the opportunity to talk about the “pastoral implications” of the marriage canon vote during the bishops’ meeting.“Regardless of what happens, people are going to be affected—whether there is a ‘no’ vote, or a ‘yes’ vote, or a delay vote or whatever it is,” he said. “We spent some time on just how do we then deal with the hurt and the pain of a result that people weren’t expecting or didn’t want.”Many of the bishops, he explained, plan on sending out pastoral letters regardless of the vote’s outcome, and he plans on holding a day for diocesan lay and ordained leaders to sit down and talk about what happened.The marriage canon was only one of several topics to which bishops devoted themselves at last week’s meeting. One highlight of the week, Hiltz said, was a session on dialogue with Islam that included a presentation by David Goa, director of the Chester Ronning Centre for the Study of Religion and Public Life at the University of Alberta. Among other things, Hiltz said, Goa spoke about the importance of Jesus and Mary in the Muslim tradition, and told them that religiously motivated violence was “a tragedy, a betrayal of the way they understand Allah.”Another was a talk on the global refugee situation by Ian McBride, executive director of AURA, an alliance between the Anglican diocese of Toronto and the Toronto Conference of the United Church of Canada, aimed at helping with the settlement of refugees. Among other things, McBride informed them that there are now an estimated 60 million refugees worldwide, about four million of whom are Syrians, Hiltz said.Robertson said he found the presentation on Islam “very interesting,” and noted that while the Yukon doesn’t have thousands of Muslims, there are “more than you would think,” due to the influx of immigrants from countries in the Middle East.“In Whitehorse…there is a regular group of Muslims that meet on a regular basis,” he said. “The big cities have pockets and groups of Muslims.”last_img read more