Category: rrgyncyx

Oil price is near to $100 a barrel

Oil price is near to $100 a barrel

first_img KCS-content Wednesday 12 January 2011 8:40 pm Share Tags: NULL by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite HeraldAlphaCute30 Rules That All “Hells Angels” Have To FollowAlphaCuteDefinitionDesi Arnaz Kept This Hidden Throughout The Filming of ‘I Love Lucy’Definition whatsappcenter_img Show Comments ▼ BRENT crude prices rose yesterday to near $99 a barrel after production shutdowns, falling US inventories and growing demand sent oil toward triple digits for the first time since 2008.Crude gained after a US government report showed oil inventories fell for the sixth straight week, slashing supplies by nearly 27m barrels in that stretch, the biggest six-week decline since January 2008.Oil prices have been steadily climbing since the third quarter of 2010 on signs the improving economy was spurring demand for fuel. whatsapp Oil price is near to $100 a barrel More From Our Partners Astounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comlast_img read more

Clarion Gaming formalises support for All-In Diversity Project

Clarion Gaming formalises support for All-In Diversity Project

first_img14th November 2018 | By Hannah Gannage-Stewart Tags: Online Gambling Topics: People AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Clarion Gaming has agreed a strategic partnership with the All-In Diversity Project, enforcing its mission to support under-represented members of the industry.Under the terms of the partnership Clarion brands, including iGaming Business, will provide a platform for the All-In Diversity Project helping to disseminate news, host webinars, and feature the project and related initiatives.All-In Diversity will also have a presence at Clarion Gaming’s leading business to business events including ICE London, which takes place 5-7 February at ExCeL, London, UK.Clarion’s portfolio includes many of the industry’s best known event, training and publishing brands and the business has taken steps recently to publicly advocate its support for a more inclusive industry.Earlier this year, the events company revised its code of conduct including new guidance on gender representation and dress codes for stand staff.Clarion Gaming managing director Kate Chambers said formalising its long-term support for the All-In Project underlines Clarion Gaming’s commitment to diversity and inclusion.“We are delighted to lend our support to the objectives set out by the All-In Diversity Project.  We believe more needs to be done not only to improve access, diversity and inclusion in gaming but in general to modernise the culture of gaming and  better reflect its aims to become recognised as a responsible, technology-led part of the entertainment industry,” she said.Earlier this year iGaming Business ran its first Most Influential Women feature, with founders of All-In Christina Thakor-Rankin and Kelly Kehn making up part of the industry judging panel.Following the feature, All-In ran an event in conjunction with the magazine inviting the Most Influential to discuss the best ways forward in terms of improving diversity, as well as to create a networking forum.Chambers added that she hoped that collaboration “will continue and develop into other events and initiatives.”Thakor-Rankin said: “Clarion Gaming is active throughout the gaming space and is uniquely positioned to connect businesses in every gaming vertical and in every jurisdiction.  The organisation is an ideal strategic partner and will help us to educate, engage and inform businesses of all sizes about the importance of diversity and inclusion in helping to meet commercial objectives and in particular recruit the next generation of talent.”center_img Clarion Gaming formalises support for All-In Diversity Project People Clarion Gaming seals strategic partnership with the All-In Diversity Project Subscribe to the iGaming newsletterlast_img read more

NPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng) 2019 Annual Report

NPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng) 2019 Annual Report

first_imgNPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Financial sector has released it’s 2019 annual report.For more information about NPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the NPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: NPF Microfinance Bank Plc (NPFMCR.ng)  2019 annual report.Company ProfileNPF Microfinance Bank Plc is a financial services institution in Nigeria offering banking products and services for both serving and retired Officers and men and women employed by the Nigeria Police Force as well as the general banking public. The company is the leading microfinance institution in Nigeria and also offers loans, advances, money market products and financial advisory services to the retail, commercial and corporate sectors. The company has developed specialised products which includes Police After Service Account, Police Focal Account and IGP Premium Bond. Established in 1993, NPF Microfinance Bank Plc was granted its full license to operate as a Community Bank in 2002. It converted from its Community Bank status to a Microfinance Bank following a directive from the Central Bank of Nigeria. Its head office is in Obalende, Nigeria and its branch network extends to all the Police commands in the country. NPF Microfinance Bank Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Forget the top Cash ISA rate. I’d pocket a 4.3% passive income from FTSE 100 stocks today

Forget the top Cash ISA rate. I’d pocket a 4.3% passive income from FTSE 100 stocks today

first_img Image source: Getty Images. Peter Stephens has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Forget the top Cash ISA rate. I’d pocket a 4.3% passive income from FTSE 100 stocks today I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Cash ISAs continue to be hugely popular, despite interest rates being close to historic lows. This means that in many cases, savers are receiving an income return that is lower than inflation. Over time, this can lead to a loss of spending power.As such, investing in FTSE 100 shares could be a better idea. Despite a strong performance in 2019, the index continues to offer a dividend yield that is above 4%. Through buying a diverse range of shares, you may be able to build a surprisingly large passive income that grows at a faster pace than inflation.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Cash ISA prospectsWhile interest rates are unlikely to stay at their current low level in the long run, their rise could prove to be painfully slow for savers. The UK’s economic outlook continues to be highly uncertain, and Brexit risks could be present throughout 2020. Alongside the prospect of low inflation, this may lead to the Bank of England deciding to keep interest rates at a low level. This would help to support the UK’s economic performance during what is a challenging period.The end result of this could be further below-inflation returns for Cash ISA savers. In the long run, the loss of spending power could prove to be significant and may be detrimental to your retirement plans.FTSE 100 prospectsOf course, the FTSE 100 is a riskier place to invest than holding cash in an ISA. The index currently faces numerous risks, such as geopolitical uncertainty in the Middle East and a global trade war, that could negatively impact on its performance.However, the track record of the index shows that its members have offered high and growing dividends in many cases. Therefore, with the FTSE 100 offering a wide range of companies that are due to post improving levels of profitability in 2020 and beyond, now could be a good time to purchase stocks that offer dividend growth potential. In many cases, their low valuations suggest that they offer wide margins of safety that may factor in the risks facing the world economy.Building a portfolioDue to the risks involved in buying shares, it makes sense to diversify. This reduces your reliance on one or more companies, and may mean that a dividend cut or profit warning has a smaller impact on your overall returns versus a concentrated portfolio.With it being easier and cheaper than ever to open a Stocks and Shares ISA, obtaining the FTSE 100’s 4.3% yield is increasingly accessible to almost anyone. Although buying shares can produce greater volatility than having a Cash ISA, in the long run it could have a far greater positive impact on your passive income and financial future. As such, now could be the right time to pivot from cash to shares. Enter Your Email Address I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Peter Stephens | Saturday, 11th January, 2020 | More on: ^FTSE See all posts by Peter Stephens “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”last_img read more

Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration

Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 14, 2013 at 8:18 am I am sure that conferences like this have a useful purpose beyond the grandiose plans and overarching agreements that seem to have been reached once again regarding the provision of health services for the Haitian people. What is needed is practical implementation of actual health care services. Such information was provided by Hugh Davies and his team from the Middleham & St. Peter’s Episcopal Church (Lusby, MD) with the La Resurrection School Nurse project that has now been in place for two years providing daily health care and education for the students at that school. I don’t even see this mentioned in this “core principles” article. We do not need more conferences like this; what we do need is the actual delivery of health care and education in our schools now. Just as that being provided at La Resurrection School. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Dan Tootle says: Rector Albany, NY Richard C Ellis says: Haiti Medical Missions, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Haiti medical mission group sets ‘core principles,’ urges collaboration Meeting brings together Haitians, Americans to listen to, learn from each other Tags September 16, 2013 at 12:19 am Me too…I need to be better connected. I work in Ouanaminthe, Haiti on the border with the DR. Next Medical Mission is Jan. 23rd 2014. Leave from the Rocky Mountains to Dallas into Miami and then through Porta Plata, DR. We cross at Dajabon, DR for Ouanaminthe. All are welcome! Rosemari Sullivan says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ October 15, 2013 at 7:35 pm Our Kansas City Foundation supports a birthing center in rural Haiti which is a ministry of the Episcopal Church of Haiti. The foundation partners with several Episcopal churches in Kansas City and around the country, and our ongoing (since 2004) operations definitely follow the core principles listed above. How can we participate with you? We would love to be in contact. Our local Haitian staff functions autonomously, while we provide financial support, but we would love to continue a dialogue about sustainability. Looking forward to hearing from you!Dr. Betsy Wickstrom Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 13, 2013 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Dr. Betsy Wickstrom says: AliceMarie Slaven-Emond says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Among the questions discussed by the attendees was how to define “sustainability” and how they try to apply the concept to the work they do in Haiti.James Ingvoldstad, an obstetrician/gynecologist who has worked for 12 years with La Gonâve Haiti Partnership, said his understanding of sustainability has changed over those years.“My first thought was: Go in, teach people how to do stuff, teach them how to fish, leave and then they can fish,” he said. “I’ve discovered that isn’t very possible in Haiti at this particular time. I realized that we’re a little bit naïve and maybe pompous to think that could exist when you look at …non-profit hospitals in the United States [which] could not operate on patient revenues. They all have huge endowments. That’s their sustainability.”Ingvoldstad said he knows that sustainability is not “somebody with a big bucket of money coming down there every other year because that’s going to fade away; you get tired, you get burned out.”Perhaps, he said, corporate investment with accompanying corporate investment in Haiti’s basic needs ought to be fostered.[A video of the Rev. Kesner Ajax, Diocese of Haiti partnership coordinator, explaining to the gathering why the La Gonâve Haiti Partnership works so well, is here.]Another element in forging sustainable programs “comes from the relationships that you form,” said Bob Sloane, a doctor who manages the guest house for mission trips to Hôpital Sainte Croix (Holy Cross Hospital) in Léogâne.“It’s not only the teaching-the-person-to-fish element but, enabling that person, empowering that person and building the kind of trust … so that if you’re removed from the equation, that person is still empowered on-site, has initiative … and can sustain themselves to a certain degree,” he said.Referencing Ingvoldstad’s concern about organizers getting burned out, Sloane also suggested that “transition leadership” has to be part of any mission plan, “so that there is a next generation that has the same passion.”Hilda Alcindor, dean of the FSIL School of Nursing in Léogâne, said creating sustainability means having a long-term plan.“You just don’t come and say ‘Oh, those poor people; gotta do something for Haiti,’” she said, adding that money spent for those kind of trips is ultimately wasted.One of the goals of sustainability, she said, must be empowerment.“We need to teach the Haitian people how to take care of themselves. It’s not for you to come and be the boss,” Alcindor said, adding that mission trip participants must work side by side with the Haitians.“We do count. We’re in-country. We know what’s going on,” she said. “Don’t come and tell us what to do. Share with us what we need to do. That’s going to be sustainability when you share with us. We tell you, you tell us and then together we come with a plan. You don’t come with your plan and impose it; it’s not going to be sustainable.”The Rev. C.J. Van Slyke, a nurse and a deacon in the Diocese of Alabama involved with that diocese’s companion relationship with Haiti, said that participants have been learning to talk with their Haitian partners about what they want and need, and what they could do.“We’ve learned over the years how much more effective and meaningful it is if you can respect and keep developing those relationships and working from within,” rather than simply coming into Haiti with preconceived ideas, she said.[ooyala code=”JmYzVpZTqDHWJH6VieLJ2WlNGt6Kb9VA” player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″] This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group September 15, 2013 at 12:10 pm How do people get invited or become aware of such a conference? St Stephen’s and other parishes in the Diocese of East Tennessee are working with the Children’s Nutrition Program and others in the rural areas around Leogane. A current additional initiative is starting a permanent walk-in type clinic in the mountains in a community we have been partnering with since mid 1990s. We are now in process of establishing operational protocols and pharmaceutical lists that are acceptable to Haiti. Had we known about this conference we may have been able to attend.Perhaps if Mr Tootle had been invited he could have felt a part of the efforts rather than just throwing darts at it.Several month ago, someone introducing himself as from the Episcopal Church asked for my contact information. He said was assembling an information database of efforts underway for Haiti. Nothing has come of that, apparently no information was shared. It seems there continues to be a disconnect. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Episcopal News Service – Miami, Florida] An ecumenical group of people involved in medical missions to Haiti has offered colleagues in the Episcopal Church and beyond a set of “core principles” that ought to guide those efforts.“With the common goal to stimulate growth and sustainability of accessible quality health care in Haiti, we believe these core principles to be essential and covenant in this collaborative effort to apply them in the development and implementation of all Haiti Partnership Program medical mission efforts,” those attending the Sept. 6-7 Haiti Medical Missions Best Practices Symposium at the Miami Airport Marriott said in a “covenant statement” they released after the meeting.The partnership program is an effort of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti to coordinate and facilitate the desire of Episcopalians outside of Haiti to come to the diocese on mission trips.The attendees’ covenant statement said all organizers of mission trips should develop a partnership agreement that include:Performing a community assessment that would document community resources, identify needs, listen to what the community wants, what current initiatives are in place, needs and history of other missions.Developing a plan for sustainability, which the statement describes as “empowerment of the community through partner (Haitian and American) accountability, trust, honesty, and commitment with the ultimate goal of ‘It will be there when I am gone.’”Forging a medical mission-to-recipient partnership that will be a community-to-community effort of people working side-by-side.Coordinating and communicating about resources between medical mission organizations and with Haitian organizations, as well as paying attention to scheduling of trips and identified needs to be served.Clearly defining the intent of the mission, including having measurable goals.Developing and implementing ways to evaluate outcomes and assess what is accomplished.The Rev. Frantz Cassesus, Diocese of Haiti canon to the ordinary, who attended the symposium, has reviewed the covenant statement with Bishop of Haiti Jean Zaché Duracin, and the bishop is pleased with the work initiated at the symposium, the Rev. Clelia P. Garrity of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Delray Beach, Florida, told ENS.[ooyala code=”h2YTJoZTpRxISMnGH-XwYa88cduAypm8″ player_id=”d4a5625b85af485eb1fff640076c5be6″] Featured Events Comments (6) Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Haiti, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rosemari Sullivan says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Health & Healthcare In his keynote address Sikumbuzo Vundla, the diocese’s chief operating officer, called for partnerships in Haiti to be based on mutual trust and respect and include “regular and frank discussions” about the course of the relationship and the work involved.“Our resources in Haiti are challenging,” he said, adding that the diocese is still trying to rebuild its resources after the 2010 earthquake, and it will continue to need resources from outside the country. However, he said, partnerships where all the resources come from outside the diocese can be lopsided. And so the diocese is trying be “more responsible and more responsive and take more ownership of the programs that we’re doing, and trying to contribute more from within.”“People in partnerships must trust one another and the Diocese of Haiti will be working on that trust, building that trust, rebranding ourselves, if you like,” he said. “We have seen from our own experience that lack of trust in many cases has led to miscommunication.”Vundla said “partners should be accountable to each other” and to the recipients of their efforts, and partnership should be based on a business model “in terms of commitment and time.”“Too often partnerships fall because people do not take the time to make them work,” he said. “That is why we are saying [that] in the Diocese of Haiti it is not business as usual. We are taking every precaution, every measure, to ensure that our partnerships continue to improve, continue to strive for the benefit of the beneficiaries and those give us the resources to serve the people of Haiti.”Both Alcindor and Frantz Large, president of the Haitian Society of Opthamology, cautioned against encouraging what they called the “beggar mentality” that exists in Haiti.“You get there,” Alcindor told the attendees, “you give them everything. They need to give you something. Stop giving for free.”Holding her upturned hands out in front of her, Alcindor said “stop keeping my hands like that … I want to hold my hands down … I want to be proud, with my head up.”Haitians living outside of Haiti, who are known as the Haitian diaspora, are not involved enough in helping their birth country “because we were never taught how to serve; it is a cultural thing so we need to teach the children to serve, how to help out,” she added.Large said some people who could pay for medical services instead come to free clinics, thus making it difficult for Haitian medical professionals to make a living.Large and Alcindor called for mission trips that include teaching and training components so that Haitians can learn best medical practices. And, Large and others said, mission teams need to be willing to coordinate their trips to serve the needs of recipients best, based both on their location and their illnesses.Ingvoldstad said he once asked Alcindor to send a nursing school graduate to help on La Gonâve. She told him to send her someone from La Gonâve to studying nursing and she would send that person back to the Haitian island.“I said: ‘Oh, this is a nice lesson. I was a beggar and she made me be a participant,’” Ingvoldstad said.The conference was sponsored by Grey Dove Inc., whose goal is to stimulate the wellbeing and sustainability of communities throughout the world by providing primary and specialized medical care and prevention education. Garrity founded Grey Dove and she is also president of the board of directors of the South Florida Haiti Project and coordinator of Esther’s Voice, a human trafficking awareness initiative in South Florida.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 18, 2013 at 2:08 pm We look forward to connecting with you. As I mentioned above to Mr. Ellis, we are working at making as many connections as possible and collaborating on best practices. Please be in touch with Clelia Garrity at [email protected] September 18, 2013 at 2:04 pm Mr Elis,Thank you for your response. First, the person who contacted you was from The Church Center and the Development Office there. He has done an incredible job of developing a database of Episcopal Churches involved in Haiti. The Development office just shared the “medical” contacts with Rev. Garrity yesterday so we are hoping to expand our contacts with this very important wider group as soon as possible. In planning the symposium, Clelia Garrity reached out to all those known to her at the time. We will definitely continue to build on this. Please be directly in touch with Clelia at [email protected] We would be value your experience and do our best to connect. Rosemari Sullivan Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

Green Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers

Green Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers

first_imgGreen Houses – Strijp R / Eek en DekkersSave this projectSaveGreen Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers Green Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers Year:  2017 Bouwbedrijf van Gerven Photographs:  Thomas Mayer Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Projects Area:  408 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” CopyHouses•Eindhoven, The Netherlands Architects: Eek en Dekkers Area Area of this architecture project ArchDaily “COPY” Contractor: Photographs The Netherlands Houses ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/883356/green-houses-nil-strijp-r-eek-en-dekkers Clipboard Manufacturers: Kingspan Insulated Panels ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/883356/green-houses-nil-strijp-r-eek-en-dekkers Clipboard Structural Engineer:JV2 bouwadviesBuilding Engineer:Team 42Architects In Charge:Piet Hein Eek, Iggie DekkersCity:EindhovenCountry:The NetherlandsMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Thomas MayerRecommended ProductsWoodEGGERLaminatesDoorsVEKADoors – VEKAMOTION 82GlassSolarluxGlass Canopy – SDL AcubisWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesText description provided by the architects. There is a story behind nearly every design I conceive. Very often the story is about coincidence or even a failure that ultimately turns out to be a success. Generally speaking, failures are blamed on fate but, in practice, successes are also the consequence of fate, or at least mine are. The Green House is an example of this. We needed to realize new-build housing on the land of the RAG building in order to close the budget, and preferably houses with a large floor area on a small plot because that would yield a great deal.Save this picture!© Thomas MayerSave this picture!1st Floor PlanSave this picture!© Thomas MayerHowever, the first RAG buyers immediately made it clear that they did not really appreciate these houses, however beautiful, being placed right under their noses. So we immediately consigned these superb homes to the rubbish bin in order to create new plans. Who knew, maybe we would fish them back out again sometime.  Save this picture!© Thomas MayerLuckily a much better plan has come in their place: two Green Houses inspired by the housing in the RAG building. That means living on the first floor with a south-facing roof terrace; large, spacious, green, sunny, modern, industrial, light, and open in all aspects. To safeguard the unobstructed view from the roof terraces of the RAG building, the new homes are to be sunk into the ground. Consequently, the houses will be split-level and the ground floor with the sleeping quarters will be one metre below ground level. Through the creation of this split-level building, the terrace, which will be the roof of the car port and storage area, will be one metre higher than the living room and kitchen on the first floor. The counter tops in the kitchen will continue visually in the roof terrace so that outdoors and indoors are more explicitly connected. Save this picture!© Thomas MayerWhile the RAG building offers space for 10 homes under one roof, the Green House is a single-family detached house. The houses became green once we had considered which material would be in keeping with or rather in contrast to the yellow stone of the RAG building.  We chose for contrast: now there will be two smaller green buildings alongside the bright yellow brick block. However the outline of the Green House will be consistent with that of the RAG building because the houses will also have the roof terraces previously utilized in the RAG building. Therefore the silhouette of the RAG building will be mirrored in the Green House.   Save this picture!© Thomas MayerSave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Thomas MayerWe wanted to use the RAG building not only as a source of inspiration for the design and way of living but also as inspiration for the construction method. How would it be possible these days to build, in a pragmatic and cost efficient way, a house with the same industrial look as that created by the Philips engineers when they built the buildings on Strijp R in the fifties? Our solution was a concrete building system with fixed sizes, prefabricated parts and a flexible floor plan. The windows fit exactly into the façade, in a fixed framework, and will be placed in such a way that they will offer maximum light and view without overlooking each other. The amount of glass in each house will be nearly three times the minimum required according to existing legislation, yet at the same time privacy will be safeguarded. Aside from the first-floor living, the roof terrace and the green exterior, the building will also be characterized by materials that are in themselves already beautiful, such as cement, wood and glass. The staircase is in the heart of the building so the layout is extremely functional and can be tailored to anyone’s wishes.Save this picture!© Thomas MayerProject gallerySee allShow lessFNG Group Headquarters / Stéphane Beel ArchitectsSelected ProjectsLehtikangas School, Kindergarten and Library / alt ArchitectsSelected Projects Share Save this picture!© Thomas Mayer+ 26 Share CopyAbout this officeEek en DekkersOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesEindhovenThe NetherlandsPublished on November 10, 2017Cite: “Green Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers” 10 Nov 2017. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectGlass3MGlass Finish – FASARA™ GradationPartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesWall / Ceiling LightsCocowebLighting – Blackspot LED Barn LightUrban ApplicationsIsland Exterior FabricatorsPublic Safety Answering Center II Envelope SystemCeilingsSculptformTimber Batten Ceiling in All Souls ChapelHanging LampsLouis PoulsenLamp – PH 5 + PH 5 MiniGlazedGrespaniaWall Tiles – Porto PetroThermalSchöckInsulation – Isokorb® Concrete to SteelCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Baguettes in Vork CenterCompositesLamitechPlastic facades PanelexCarpetsHalcyon LakeCarpet – Nobsa GreyMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?黑表皮的“绿色小屋” Green Houses – Strijp R / Eek en Dekkers是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, pioneer in medicine

Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, pioneer in medicine

first_imgDr. Susan Smith McKinney StewardAfrican-American history is part of U.S. history. In reclaiming that history, one African American to be remembered is Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, the first Black woman to earn a medical degree in New York state and the third in the U.S. She practiced medicine for 48 years.Born in the historic village of Weeksville, Brooklyn, N.Y., in March 1847, Smith became a student of music early in her life. However, she turned her focus to studying medicine, and in 1867, Smith enrolled at the New York Medical College for Women. Earning her medical degree in 1870, this brilliant woman was the valedictorian of her graduating class.The following year Dr. Smith married the Rev. William McKinney, who died in 1892. They had two children. She set her up her own medical practice in Brooklyn from 1870 to 1895; co-founded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary for the African-American community; and obtained a postgraduate degree. She also practiced at other hospitals, with specialties in prenatal care and childhood diseases.Dr. Smith McKinney married the Rev. Theophilus Steward, an Army chaplain, in 1896, and traveled westward with him, obtaining medical licenses in Montana and Wyoming. Wilberforce University in Ohio hired the doctor in 1898 as a campus physician and faculty member.  There she taught nutrition and health and lived out the rest of her life.A public speaker, Dr. Smith McKinney Steward was frequently invited to address conferences and meetings.  She spoke about Black women in the U.S. at the first Universal Race Congress at the University of London in 1911. Three years later she spoke on “Women in Medicine” at the convention of the National Association of “Colored” Women’s Clubs.  She was also an advocate for women’s suffrage.Dr. Smith McKinney Steward’s achievements were so great and she was so well-respected that W.E.B. Du Bois gave the eulogy at her funeral in March 1918. She was buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn.A Brooklyn school was renamed Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward Junior High School in 1974 to honor this groundbreaking woman. Two years later, African-American women doctors named a National Medical Association chapter for her.Weeksville: A historic Black community The area known today as Brooklyn was originally inhabited by the Indigenous Lenape Nation, then by Dutch colonizers and then by the British beginning in the 1600s until their ouster in 1783. By 1834, the city of Brooklyn had consolidated and was incorporated.The village of Weeksville where Dr. Smith McKinney Steward was born has a unique history. In 1838, James Weeks, a longshore worker and formerly enslaved person from Virginia, bought a two-acre plot of land in the eastern area of Brooklyn, only 11 years after the abolition of slavery in New York.Weeks founded a village there that grew eventually to include 700 families; it was one of the first “free” African-American communities in New York state.  It was named Weeksville after him.Land was easily available for purchase then. Many African Americans saw acquiring land as their chance to obtain economic and political freedom by building their own communities.  In New York, before the Civil War, men of color had to own property valued at a minimum of $250 and pay taxes on it  in order to vote.Weeksville founders were Black political activists, artisans and land investors. By the 1850s, the village had become a refuge for more than 500 people from around the East Coast; nearly 40 percent were born in the South. The community was also a safe haven for many African Americans fleeing the violent, virulently racist 1863 New York draft riots in Manhattan.Weeksville had its own churches, a cemetery, an orphanage and a home for the elderly. One of the first African-American newspapers, the “Freedman’s Torchlight,” was published there. The village became the national headquarters of the African Civilization Society in the 1860s. The community’s school for African-American children was the first such school in the country to integrate its staff and student body.Soon after the Hunterfly Road Houses were discovered in 1968, the Society for the Preservation of Weeksville and Bedford-Stuyvesant History was established. It is now the Weeksville Heritage Center, a national historic district bordering the neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. Four residential buildings remain, which were built during and after the 1860s in the Black community of Weeksville.The wooden-frame dwellings sit alongside a road dating back to Native peoples’ habitation of the area. The houses were declared New York City landmarks in 1970, purchased by the preservation society in 1973 and then rehabilitated in the 1980s. Education and cultural centers were built adjacent to the houses. All facilities are open to the public.Sources:  BlackPast.org; “Brooklyn’s Promised Land: The Free Black Community of Weeksville, New York” by Judith Wellman (NYU Press, 2014);  Brooklyn Historical Society.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum

RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum

first_img Paul Ratje / AFP July 27, 2018 RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum Follow the news on United States Cuba continues to be Latin America’s worst media freedom violator year after year. Arbitrary arrests and imprisonment, threats, smear campaigns, confiscation of equipment and closure of websites are the most common forms of harassment, all of which are reinforced by an arsenal of restrictive laws. Mexico remains the western hemisphere’s most dangerous country for journalists, where more than 100 journalists have been killed since the year 2000, and 20 have disappeared. Serafin Moran Santiago’s case echoes that of two recent cases of Mexican journalists. Martin Mendez approached the US border in 2017 seeking asylum from the dangers of reporting in Mexico, but eventually gave up his request after spending months in an ICE detention facility with unlivable conditions. Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, a journalist who was taken along with his son into ICE custody in December 2017, was held in a detention center near El Paso, Texas, until his release on July 26. He is still awaiting a decision in his asylum request. News United StatesAmericas to go further An independent reporter for media outlets including Univision 23, Telemundo, Primavera Digital and TVMarti, Santiago told RSF he was targeted by the authorities for covering political issues, including police misconduct and human rights. Santiago alleges that he was kidnapped and beaten in June 2016 by Cuban state security officers after he criticized government actions in his reporting. Santiago was again arrested and his equipment confiscated on September 2, 2017, on his way to interview one of the leaders of a socialist dissident movement in Cuba. June 3, 2021 Find out more “Serafin Moran Santiago came to the US seeking refuge from the Cuban authorities and has instead been detained by ICE for more than three months,” said Margaux Ewen, RSF’s North America director. “His deportation to Cuba, where independent journalists are targeted and harassed by the authorities, is not an option. Therefore we call on the US government to release Serafin immediately while he awaits resolution of his request for asylum.” RSF_en United StatesAmericas Organisation WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists After being kidnapped, jailed, and persecuted by the Cuban government for his reporting, Santiago approached the US border seeking political asylum on April 13. He was detained and has since been held at the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) South Texas Detention Center while his asylum application is pending. Santiago fears he will be attacked or even killed if he returns to Cuba, and has already passed a credible fear screening, which the US authorities use to determine whether there are grounds that a real threat exists. He is next due to appear in court on October 12, 2018. News News Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the immediate release of Serafin Moran Santiago, an independent Cuban journalist who has been held in a detention facility in Pearsall, Texas, for more than three months. June 7, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Santiago eventually fled Cuba for Guyana and then Mexico, where he stayed in a migrant refugee center for a little more than a month until the Cuban Embassy in Mexico began to target him. Seeking political asylum, he approached the US border in April and was immediately detained by ICE.  Santiago is receiving pro-bono legal assistance through a non-profit organization dedicated to helping refugees and immigrants, and is in regular contact with RSF. The United States ranks 45th out of 180 countries on RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Cuba ranks 172/180. For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en. News Help by sharing this information NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault

Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault

first_img Receive email alerts RSF_en #CollateralFreedom: RSF unblocks eight sites censored during pandemic Follow the news on Tajikistan News Help by sharing this information to go further Organisation Journalist loses accreditation over report about Tajikistan’s president August 24, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault News May 14, 2021 Find out more News The country has been deprived of three opposition newspapers by the sealing of a private printworks. Another paper has been blocked from appearing for two weeks for similar reasons. This follows an assault on Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, and repeated threats against independent journalist Mavluda Sultonzoda. News Tajikistan imposes total control over independent broadcast media August 25, 2020 Find out more November 6, 2020 Find out more TajikistanEurope – Central Asia Reporters Without Borders voiced concern at a “serious worsening” in press freedom in Tajikistan as independent and opposition newspapers were prevented from printing, coming after a physical attack on one journalist and repeated threats against another.The widest range of tactics was being used to silence the few independent voices as elections approach, said the international press freedom organisation.Tax police closed and sealed private printers Jiyonkhon on 18 August preventing the publication of three newspapers. On 16 August the state printers Sanadvora refused to print opposition newspaper Odamu Olam. This came in the wake of a physical attack against Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, and repeated threats against independent journalist Mavluda Sultonzoda. Reporters Without Borders appealed to President Emomali Rakhmonov to “make sure that Rajabi Mirzo’s assailants did not enjoy impunity and that official procedures were not used as false pretexts for gagging the press”.The private Jiyonkhon printworks was closed before it began printing independent weekly Nerui Sukhan. According to the tax authorities, Jiyonkhon was using a larger amount of paper than it was registered for. It will remain closed pending investigation.Jiyonkhon is the only printer in the country that agrees to print the three opposition weeklies Nerui Sukhan, Ruzi Nav and Najot (newspaper of the opposition Islamic Revival party). The tax authorities’ decision thus deprives the country of three independent papers until further notice.State printers Sanadvora refused to print opposition weekly Odamu Olam, breaking its contract with the paper. The newspaper has not appeared since then. No other printer will take it over.This all happened as working conditions for journalists worsened.Mavluda Sultonzoda, journalist on the opposition weeklies Ruzi Nav and Nerui Sukhan, received phoned threats after writing an article headlined “Who is Rakhmonov?” in which she criticised President Rakhmonov and his government. She revealed that she has been receiving threats since December 2003. For the first time, however threats were also being made against her family.A few days earlier, on 29 July, Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, was attacked in Dushanbe. Eye-witnesses said that an assailant lay in wait for the journalist to return home for several hours at a bus stop on Avenue Profsoyuz, then beat the journalist on the head with a blunt instrument before fleeing. Mirzo said he believed the attack was linked to his articles exposing government corruption. The Dushanbe prosecutor’s office has opened an investigation. TajikistanEurope – Central Asia last_img read more

City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy

City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy

first_img Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleCope pushing to improve circumstances of fishermen working off Irish coastsNext articleForum concerned at the level of alcohol abuse by Donegal teens News Highland City of Derry Airport has backed down after telling an employee it was unacceptable to wear a poppy at work, according to an Ulster Unionist councillor.Mary Hamilton said when she queried the case with airport management, she was told they were enforcing council policy by banning the poppy.But Derry City Council has said it does not have such a policy.Mrs Hamilton said management at the airport didn’t realise that the poppy wasn’t banned by Derry City Council..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/mham1pm.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Pinterest Pinterest News City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy By News Highland – November 9, 2011 NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Facebookcenter_img Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+ Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny WhatsApp 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Google+last_img read more