Category: rrgyncyx

Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, pioneer in medicine

Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, pioneer in medicine

first_imgDr. Susan Smith McKinney StewardAfrican-American history is part of U.S. history. In reclaiming that history, one African American to be remembered is Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward, the first Black woman to earn a medical degree in New York state and the third in the U.S. She practiced medicine for 48 years.Born in the historic village of Weeksville, Brooklyn, N.Y., in March 1847, Smith became a student of music early in her life. However, she turned her focus to studying medicine, and in 1867, Smith enrolled at the New York Medical College for Women. Earning her medical degree in 1870, this brilliant woman was the valedictorian of her graduating class.The following year Dr. Smith married the Rev. William McKinney, who died in 1892. They had two children. She set her up her own medical practice in Brooklyn from 1870 to 1895; co-founded the Brooklyn Women’s Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary for the African-American community; and obtained a postgraduate degree. She also practiced at other hospitals, with specialties in prenatal care and childhood diseases.Dr. Smith McKinney married the Rev. Theophilus Steward, an Army chaplain, in 1896, and traveled westward with him, obtaining medical licenses in Montana and Wyoming. Wilberforce University in Ohio hired the doctor in 1898 as a campus physician and faculty member.  There she taught nutrition and health and lived out the rest of her life.A public speaker, Dr. Smith McKinney Steward was frequently invited to address conferences and meetings.  She spoke about Black women in the U.S. at the first Universal Race Congress at the University of London in 1911. Three years later she spoke on “Women in Medicine” at the convention of the National Association of “Colored” Women’s Clubs.  She was also an advocate for women’s suffrage.Dr. Smith McKinney Steward’s achievements were so great and she was so well-respected that W.E.B. Du Bois gave the eulogy at her funeral in March 1918. She was buried in Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn.A Brooklyn school was renamed Dr. Susan Smith McKinney Steward Junior High School in 1974 to honor this groundbreaking woman. Two years later, African-American women doctors named a National Medical Association chapter for her.Weeksville: A historic Black community The area known today as Brooklyn was originally inhabited by the Indigenous Lenape Nation, then by Dutch colonizers and then by the British beginning in the 1600s until their ouster in 1783. By 1834, the city of Brooklyn had consolidated and was incorporated.The village of Weeksville where Dr. Smith McKinney Steward was born has a unique history. In 1838, James Weeks, a longshore worker and formerly enslaved person from Virginia, bought a two-acre plot of land in the eastern area of Brooklyn, only 11 years after the abolition of slavery in New York.Weeks founded a village there that grew eventually to include 700 families; it was one of the first “free” African-American communities in New York state.  It was named Weeksville after him.Land was easily available for purchase then. Many African Americans saw acquiring land as their chance to obtain economic and political freedom by building their own communities.  In New York, before the Civil War, men of color had to own property valued at a minimum of $250 and pay taxes on it  in order to vote.Weeksville founders were Black political activists, artisans and land investors. By the 1850s, the village had become a refuge for more than 500 people from around the East Coast; nearly 40 percent were born in the South. The community was also a safe haven for many African Americans fleeing the violent, virulently racist 1863 New York draft riots in Manhattan.Weeksville had its own churches, a cemetery, an orphanage and a home for the elderly. One of the first African-American newspapers, the “Freedman’s Torchlight,” was published there. The village became the national headquarters of the African Civilization Society in the 1860s. The community’s school for African-American children was the first such school in the country to integrate its staff and student body.Soon after the Hunterfly Road Houses were discovered in 1968, the Society for the Preservation of Weeksville and Bedford-Stuyvesant History was established. It is now the Weeksville Heritage Center, a national historic district bordering the neighborhoods of Crown Heights and Bedford-Stuyvesant. Four residential buildings remain, which were built during and after the 1860s in the Black community of Weeksville.The wooden-frame dwellings sit alongside a road dating back to Native peoples’ habitation of the area. The houses were declared New York City landmarks in 1970, purchased by the preservation society in 1973 and then rehabilitated in the 1980s. Education and cultural centers were built adjacent to the houses. All facilities are open to the public.Sources:  BlackPast.org; “Brooklyn’s Promised Land: The Free Black Community of Weeksville, New York” by Judith Wellman (NYU Press, 2014);  Brooklyn Historical Society.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum

RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum

first_img Paul Ratje / AFP July 27, 2018 RSF calls on US immigration authorities to release Cuban journalist seeking asylum Follow the news on United States Cuba continues to be Latin America’s worst media freedom violator year after year. Arbitrary arrests and imprisonment, threats, smear campaigns, confiscation of equipment and closure of websites are the most common forms of harassment, all of which are reinforced by an arsenal of restrictive laws. Mexico remains the western hemisphere’s most dangerous country for journalists, where more than 100 journalists have been killed since the year 2000, and 20 have disappeared. Serafin Moran Santiago’s case echoes that of two recent cases of Mexican journalists. Martin Mendez approached the US border in 2017 seeking asylum from the dangers of reporting in Mexico, but eventually gave up his request after spending months in an ICE detention facility with unlivable conditions. Emilio Gutiérrez Soto, a journalist who was taken along with his son into ICE custody in December 2017, was held in a detention center near El Paso, Texas, until his release on July 26. He is still awaiting a decision in his asylum request. News United StatesAmericas to go further An independent reporter for media outlets including Univision 23, Telemundo, Primavera Digital and TVMarti, Santiago told RSF he was targeted by the authorities for covering political issues, including police misconduct and human rights. Santiago alleges that he was kidnapped and beaten in June 2016 by Cuban state security officers after he criticized government actions in his reporting. Santiago was again arrested and his equipment confiscated on September 2, 2017, on his way to interview one of the leaders of a socialist dissident movement in Cuba. June 3, 2021 Find out more “Serafin Moran Santiago came to the US seeking refuge from the Cuban authorities and has instead been detained by ICE for more than three months,” said Margaux Ewen, RSF’s North America director. “His deportation to Cuba, where independent journalists are targeted and harassed by the authorities, is not an option. Therefore we call on the US government to release Serafin immediately while he awaits resolution of his request for asylum.” RSF_en United StatesAmericas Organisation WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists After being kidnapped, jailed, and persecuted by the Cuban government for his reporting, Santiago approached the US border seeking political asylum on April 13. He was detained and has since been held at the Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) South Texas Detention Center while his asylum application is pending. Santiago fears he will be attacked or even killed if he returns to Cuba, and has already passed a credible fear screening, which the US authorities use to determine whether there are grounds that a real threat exists. He is next due to appear in court on October 12, 2018. News News Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the immediate release of Serafin Moran Santiago, an independent Cuban journalist who has been held in a detention facility in Pearsall, Texas, for more than three months. June 7, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Santiago eventually fled Cuba for Guyana and then Mexico, where he stayed in a migrant refugee center for a little more than a month until the Cuban Embassy in Mexico began to target him. Seeking political asylum, he approached the US border in April and was immediately detained by ICE.  Santiago is receiving pro-bono legal assistance through a non-profit organization dedicated to helping refugees and immigrants, and is in regular contact with RSF. The United States ranks 45th out of 180 countries on RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. Cuba ranks 172/180. For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en. News Help by sharing this information NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault

Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault

first_img Receive email alerts RSF_en #CollateralFreedom: RSF unblocks eight sites censored during pandemic Follow the news on Tajikistan News Help by sharing this information to go further Organisation Journalist loses accreditation over report about Tajikistan’s president August 24, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Independent press subjected to printing obstructions, threats and assault News May 14, 2021 Find out more News The country has been deprived of three opposition newspapers by the sealing of a private printworks. Another paper has been blocked from appearing for two weeks for similar reasons. This follows an assault on Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, and repeated threats against independent journalist Mavluda Sultonzoda. News Tajikistan imposes total control over independent broadcast media August 25, 2020 Find out more November 6, 2020 Find out more TajikistanEurope – Central Asia Reporters Without Borders voiced concern at a “serious worsening” in press freedom in Tajikistan as independent and opposition newspapers were prevented from printing, coming after a physical attack on one journalist and repeated threats against another.The widest range of tactics was being used to silence the few independent voices as elections approach, said the international press freedom organisation.Tax police closed and sealed private printers Jiyonkhon on 18 August preventing the publication of three newspapers. On 16 August the state printers Sanadvora refused to print opposition newspaper Odamu Olam. This came in the wake of a physical attack against Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, and repeated threats against independent journalist Mavluda Sultonzoda. Reporters Without Borders appealed to President Emomali Rakhmonov to “make sure that Rajabi Mirzo’s assailants did not enjoy impunity and that official procedures were not used as false pretexts for gagging the press”.The private Jiyonkhon printworks was closed before it began printing independent weekly Nerui Sukhan. According to the tax authorities, Jiyonkhon was using a larger amount of paper than it was registered for. It will remain closed pending investigation.Jiyonkhon is the only printer in the country that agrees to print the three opposition weeklies Nerui Sukhan, Ruzi Nav and Najot (newspaper of the opposition Islamic Revival party). The tax authorities’ decision thus deprives the country of three independent papers until further notice.State printers Sanadvora refused to print opposition weekly Odamu Olam, breaking its contract with the paper. The newspaper has not appeared since then. No other printer will take it over.This all happened as working conditions for journalists worsened.Mavluda Sultonzoda, journalist on the opposition weeklies Ruzi Nav and Nerui Sukhan, received phoned threats after writing an article headlined “Who is Rakhmonov?” in which she criticised President Rakhmonov and his government. She revealed that she has been receiving threats since December 2003. For the first time, however threats were also being made against her family.A few days earlier, on 29 July, Rajabi Mirzo, editor of Ruzi Nav, was attacked in Dushanbe. Eye-witnesses said that an assailant lay in wait for the journalist to return home for several hours at a bus stop on Avenue Profsoyuz, then beat the journalist on the head with a blunt instrument before fleeing. Mirzo said he believed the attack was linked to his articles exposing government corruption. The Dushanbe prosecutor’s office has opened an investigation. TajikistanEurope – Central Asia last_img read more

City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy

City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy

first_img Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleCope pushing to improve circumstances of fishermen working off Irish coastsNext articleForum concerned at the level of alcohol abuse by Donegal teens News Highland City of Derry Airport has backed down after telling an employee it was unacceptable to wear a poppy at work, according to an Ulster Unionist councillor.Mary Hamilton said when she queried the case with airport management, she was told they were enforcing council policy by banning the poppy.But Derry City Council has said it does not have such a policy.Mrs Hamilton said management at the airport didn’t realise that the poppy wasn’t banned by Derry City Council..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/mham1pm.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Pinterest Pinterest News City of Derry Airport changes stance over poppy By News Highland – November 9, 2011 NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Facebookcenter_img Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Google+ Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny WhatsApp 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Google+last_img read more

[2020 Tribunal Rules] AG Defends Exclusion Of Advocates From Appointment To Single-Member Tribunals, SC Reserves Judgment [Read Order]

[2020 Tribunal Rules] AG Defends Exclusion Of Advocates From Appointment To Single-Member Tribunals, SC Reserves Judgment [Read Order]

first_imgTop Stories[2020 Tribunal Rules] AG Defends Exclusion Of Advocates From Appointment To Single-Member Tribunals, SC Reserves Judgment [Read Order] Mehal Jain9 Oct 2020 9:00 AMShare This – xSupreme Court has extended the terms of Members, Vice- Chairperson and Chairperson of Tribunals which are about to expire stand extended till 31st December, 2020.The Supreme Court on Friday reserved judgment on the plea by the Madras Bar Association challenging the Tribunal Rules of 2020, on the grounds that it is in the teeth of the principles of separation of power and independence of judiciary.The Bench of Justices L. Nageswara Rao, Hemant Gupta and Ravindra Bhat were hearing the matter. The bench on Friday directed that the terms of all…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Friday reserved judgment on the plea by the Madras Bar Association challenging the Tribunal Rules of 2020, on the grounds that it is in the teeth of the principles of separation of power and independence of judiciary.The Bench of Justices L. Nageswara Rao, Hemant Gupta and Ravindra Bhat were hearing the matter. The bench on Friday directed that the terms of all chairpersons, vice-chairperson and other members of all 19 tribunals, which are due to expire, shall be extended till December 31.At the outset, the AG defended the four year tenure as stipulated under Rule 9(2) of the 2020 Rules- “Mr. (Arvind) Datar (Senior Advocate, Amicus Curiae) argued that the tenure cannot be less than 5 years because one judgment requires 5-7 years and another stipulates 5 years. But section 184 (of the Finance Act) says that any Rules that are framed governing the tenure cannot provide for a term exceeding 5 years. And in Roger Mathew, section 184 was upheld in entirety. So any tenure fixed by the Rules cannot exceed 5 years. Besides, in addition to the 4 years term, it is open for the Search Cum Selection Committee (SCSC) to reappoint the person. And the committee being headed by a SC judge, it is not an arbitrary reappointment”, argued the AG.In context of even the provision of re-appointment having been challenged for compromising the independence of the tribunals, he explained that having joined the legal profession at the age of 23, one is appointed after 25 years of substantial experience, when one is generally around the age of 48. So if after a 5 year term, no provision for reappointment is made, he will have to step down. In such an situation, nobody would come forward to apply and accept the post. The AG added that the same was true for other categories of persons also, for appointments to technical posts etc. “If one serves his tenure well, he is competent, he has integrity, he doesn’t come late, he delivers his judgments on time, then there is no reason why he would not be reappointed. The deserving candidates will get to continue for a long term- from the age of 48 to 65. And if one is lucky enough to be promoted as chairman or vice-chairman, he may even continue till 70! The same SCSC is to decide the reappointment”, he advanced.”Reappointment is essential on account of this provision which provides for a tenure of 4 years or until the age of 65 or 70, whichever is earlier. Without reappointment, not a single person would apply…also, in making the reappointment, the SC judge is to get inputs from the chairman of the tribunal himself, on factors of competence, polite behaviour to lawyers and litigants and other parameters of a good judge”, said the AG.Moving further, the AG addressed the contention that out of the 19 tribunals, in all the18, with the exception of the DRT, the Vice Chairman and the Member can only be a HC judge, and considering that a judge retires at the age of 62 years, then by virtue of this Rule, he would only get 3 years in office.Quoting from Roger Mathew, he argued that the court had, in that case, been of the view that the tenure of Members of Tribunals as prescribed under the Schedule of the 2017 Rules (of 3 years) is anti-merit and attempts to create equality between unequals. “A tenure of three years may be suitable for a retired Judge of High Court or the Supreme Court or even in case of a judicial officer on deputation. However, it will be illusory to expect a practising advocate to forego his well-established practice to serve as a Member of a Tribunal for a period of three years…In the light of the discussion as aforesaid, we hold that the Rules would require a second look since the extremely short tenure of the Members of Tribunals is anti-merit and has the effect of discouraging meritorious candidates to accept posts of Judicial Members in Tribunals”, he recited from the 2019 judgment.”They said that the tenure should be longer. So we made it 4 years. If you serve well, you could continue indefinitely…on the contrary, suppose a man is 45 when he is appointed, and if we were to give him a 7 year tenure, he would retire at the age of 52!”, contended the AG. “But one cannot be appointed at the age of 45”, pointed out the bench.Besides, the provision in the 2020 Rules allowing the Committee to recommend a panel of 2-3 suitable candidates to the government for each post was challenged. “There is no substance in the argument that if the government is given the choice to select, it will affect the independence of the tribunal…There are 50-60 applicants. There is no IB inquiry report at that initial stage. It is only when the candidate is shortlisted by the Committee that the inquiry report is looked at. And the panel so recommended need not have 3 candidates, even 2 can be selected…you have to give the government some credit, that it is not doing anything wrong”, advanced the AG.Moreover, Rule 4(3) provides that no appointment shall be called into question on account of any vacancy in the search-cum-selection committee. Last week, it was argued that there may be a situation where an appointment is made by the government, even though the post of the SC judge itself is vacant and on that ground, it was sought that the Rule be struck down. “The absence of the chairman of the SCSC can’t be contemplated. The Committee is convened only when the SC judge directs the date, time and the place of meeting. It is he who controls the affairs of the committee, not the secretaries to the government…if on any day, the SC judge is unwell, the secretaries would adjourn the meeting…one can’t think of an extra-ordinary circumstance and create a bogie…one can’t contemplate an event of the SC judge being absent and any appointment still being made and argued to be valid…”, he argued.In response to the impropriety of a retired HC judge being interviewed by the secretaries to the government, the AG advanced that retired HC judges even come to the SC to practice, and as such fall in the category of advocates and accordingly, have to be treated alike. “When we advocates can answer questions in an interview, why can’t they? Anyway, the SC judge, presiding over the committee would ensure that they are treated with respect”, advanced the AG.”They cannot claim the status of a HC judge. They cannot claim housing etc. Otherwise, the advocates who are being recruited as members would also demand a house, car etc same as the retired HC judge…though they will be treated with respect, they are as good as advocates now…even if it is a retired SC judge (who is presiding a tribunal), his decisions would be subject to judicial review by a division bench of the HC”, submitted the AG.He indicated that in Roger Mathew, the Constitution Bench had observed that it is hence essential that the Union of India abide by the spirit of the Constitution in respecting the difference between constitutional functionaries and statutory authorities, and ensure that judges of High Courts and the Supreme Court are kept on a separate pedestal distanced from any other Tribunal or quasi-judicial Authority. “Your Lordships had reiterated the observation in L. Chandra Kumar that Tribunals are not substitutes of Superior Courts and are only supplemental to them. Your Lordships noted that the status of members of such Tribunals cannot be equated with that of the sitting judges of Constitutional Courts else, as V.R. Krishna Iyer, J. aptly pointed in his article titled ‘Why Stultify Judges’ Status?’, ‘Creating deemed Justices of High Courts with equal status and salaries suggests an oblique bypassing of the Constitution….'”, urged the AG in reference to the 2019 decision.”After retirement, one is not entitled to the perquisites of a HC judge. There are 19 tribunals, with branches all over the country. It is not possible to find houses for the members all over the country. It will be a drain on the resources… Even SC judges, when they first come to Delhi, have to live in guesthouses, or their Bhavans, and have to wait before they get a house…”, argued the AG.On the objection to the presence of two secretaries on the SCSC, the AG argued that the 2017 Rules, which were struck down, provided for a SC judge and two secretaries. The Rules have now been amended to provide for a SC judge, the Chairman/outgoing chairman of the tribunal and two secretaries to the government, and the casting vote is given to the SC judge. “To have 2 SC judges on the committee would impede the disposal of cases and the work of judicial adjudication in the SC. There are 19 tribunals, and as and when a chairman, vice-chairman or other member retires in any of them, the vacancy has to be filled in then and there…we cannot allow the present situation to prevail. Right now there is a delay on the part of the government…but in the case where the chairman himself has asked for reappointment, a judge from the SC may be brought in to meet the necessity”, argued the AG.”A National Tribunals Commission was suggested by L. Chandra Kumar? Why don’t you suggest that to the government?”, asked Justice Rao.”The NTC would be conducive to the effective and independent functioning of the tribunals. It will know when a vacancy arises and an appointment needs to be made, when the budget is over and more funding is needed. I think it is necessary. I will suggest this to the government” assured the AG.In so far as the new Rules exclude advocates from considered for appointment to single-member tribunals like the DRT, DRAT, Airport Appellate Tribunal and the Industrial Tribunals, the AG explained that since these tribunals comprise only of the chairman, a lawyer with no experience in adjudication is not deemed suitable. “But when a judicial officer, having dealt with all sorts of disputes, is made the member, he learns over time and becomes competent to adjudicate such matters”, added the AG. “Sampath Kumar said that he can then even become chairman or vice-chairman…even lawyers elevated as HC judges are made to sit as juniors and circulated among benches to procure experience in commercial law etc. So to get an advocate directly in the seat of chairman of a tribunal, without any experience of adjudication would be counter-productive”, he advanced.”DRATs were originally to have ILS officers. We struck that out and now only HC judges are considered. In addition, to be presiding officer of a DRT, one needs 4 years’ experience as a district judge or 6 years’ as as an ADJ. So even a ADJ with sufficient experience can be considered…So far as the Industrial tribunals are concerned, the Industrial Disputes Act itself calls for a retired DJ or a HC judge”, pressed the AG.On the issue of retrospective application of the 2020 Rules, the AG advanced that the 2017 Rules themselves were notified on 1.6.2017, while the Appointed Date per the Finance Act is 26.5.2017. “So there was an effective gap of 6-7 days before the Rules were published. But by virtue of section 183 of the Act, these Rules came into force from the Appointed Day itself! It is this provision which carries the retrospectivity. There need not be an independent section to provide for retrospectivity (as is the case with the CGST Act, which was pointed out by Mr. Datar)…so the 2020 Rules, published on 12.2.2020, have to take effect from 26.5.2017…the whole set of 2017 Rules was wiped out, which created a vacuum that the court had filled temporarily by the Parent Acts and the old Rules made thereunder . It is now to be filled by these 2020 Rules”, urged the AG.”The purpose is to integrate the varied rules governing the conditions of appointment, selection, qualifications, tenure, salaries, removal and other terms of service in the different tribunals, and to provide a homogenous set of rules for all tribunals on an equal basis”, he stressed.On the eligibility of ILS officials to be appointed as judicial members, he advanced, “We gave them the right to be appointed, but the 2010 R. Gandhi judgment said they can be considered only for technical posts. To be appointed as an ILS officer, one needs to have an experience of 10-13 years as an advocate. These are persons who then subsequently acquire varied experience, as AORs and having the right to argue before courts, besides additional qualifications and reach the status of the Additional Secretary to the government, which takes 20-25 years. So considering a person joins the profession at 23 and is recruited into the ILS after 13 years, he will be 55 by the time he reaches this stature. One is even appointed as a HC judge when one crosses the age of 45!”, he argued.”These are people who come and instruct us everyday. Now the Rules qualify them to be appointed as Judicial Members, but some people are arguing against it?”, he urged, pointing out that even the present Director of Prosecution, CBI is an ILS officer.At this point, Justice Rao asked about a bar officer who had been appointed to the DRT. “If he went to the DRT, he would have gone as an advocate?”, asked Justice Bhat. “Yes, previously”, replied the AG. “So what is the logic in deleting advocates now?’, asked the judge. “The new regime is an improvement. It has a district judge doing similar work at the helm of the DRT”, replied the AGClick Here To Download Order[Read Order]Next Storylast_img read more

Council meet in ‘unusual’ circumstances

Council meet in ‘unusual’ circumstances

first_img DL Debate – 24/05/21 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Facebook Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Homepage BannerNews Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmecenter_img Donegal County Council is meeting today for the first time since the Covid-19 outbreak.To adhere to social distancing guidelines, only 11 members are permitted to attend. A number of Councillors have also joined online.In addressing the meeting, Cathaoirleach Councillor Nicholas Crossan described it as an unusual meeting. News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA By News Highland – May 25, 2020 Twitter Google+ Previous articleDonegal dentist hits out at PPE equipment delaysNext articleWork begins on long-awaited extension for Glenswilly NS News Highland Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Council meet in ‘unusual’ circumstanceslast_img read more

Chinese woman in Mar-a-Lago security controversy expected in court

Chinese woman in Mar-a-Lago security controversy expected in court

first_imgZolnierek/iStock(WASHINGTON) — Yujing Zhang, the Chinese national who sparked security concerns after she allegedly talked her way into the president’s Mar-a-Lago country club, is set to appear in a federal court in Florida Monday afternoon for a detention hearing.Early last week Magistrate Judge William Matthewman had ordered Zhang be held pending proceedings after an initial appearance in which prosecutors said that Zhang carried an “extreme risk of flight.”Zhang was arrested on March 30. According to a criminal complaint filed against Zhang, at around noon on that Saturday, she appeared at a Secret Service checkpoint outside the president’s country club and presented two Chinese passports. There was some confusion over whether she was a relative of a club member, and Mar-a-Lago staff cleared her through the checkpoint, the complaint says.She went through a second Secret Service checkpoint, this one where she was screened by a magnetometer for weapons or explosives, before making her way to the club’s reception area. Only there did a receptionist discover Zhang was not on the club’s access list and called the Secret Service back.When questioned by the Secret Service, Zhang said she had been told to attend a United Nations Chinese American Association event – also referred to as a “United Nations Friendship Event” — that night at Mar-a-Lago by a Chinese friend named “Charles.” The event was not on the club’s schedule. President Donald Trump was in Florida at the time, but was off-site at a nearby golf course during the incident.Asked about the incident last week, Trump called it a “fluke.” But Secretary of State Mike Pompeo Friday linked the breach to a broader “threat” he said China poses to the U.S.Since Zhang’s arrest, one focus of speculation has been on the detail in the complaint about the electronics Zhang purportedly had on her, including four cell phones, a laptop and, especially, a thumb drive that the Secret Service said a preliminary analysis showed contained malware.A former U.S. official familiar with White House cybersecurity concerns told ABC News last week it’s difficult to tell what sort of a threat the malware posed without knowing exactly what it was – whether it was run-of-the-mill malicious code that is not uncommonly found on thumb drives, or something more sophisticated meant to eventually make its way to sensitive official networks.James Mulvenon, an expert on Chinese espionage, called the incident “troubling,” but said he was doubtful it was part of a greater plot, citing what would have been “terrible tradecraft” for an actual intelligence operation.Zhang, who said during her initial appearance last week she works as a consultant to a Chinese investment firm, has not been accused of any espionage-related crimes. She faces charges for purportedly lying to federal agents – she had initially said she was there to visit the pool before allegedly changing her story – and for entering a restricted area.A public defender for Zhang declined to comment. The Chinese government said last week that it had been notified of Zhang’s arrest and is providing consular assistance to her. Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

On appeal

On appeal

first_imgOn appealOn 30 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today Continuingour regular series spelling out the implications of important cases which havebeen heard recently in the appeal courts. Debra Gers looks at the issuesCasualworker was not employeeStevedoring and Haulage Services v Fuller & others, IDS Brief 687, CAFullerwas made redundant by Stevedoring in 1995 but in 1996, to meet Stevedoring’sneed for casual workers, was re-employed “on an ad hoc and casualbasis”. The documentation Fuller signed stated that he was not an employeeand that there was no obligation for Stevedoring to provide or for Fuller toaccept work. Fuller was only paid for the hours worked and for administrationpurposes, tax was deducted under the PAYE scheme.Until1999 Fuller worked regularly and exclusively for Stevedoring under itsdirection and control and was given work in priority to others supplied by anagency. Training and protective clothing were provided.In1999, Fuller applied to the employment tribunal for written particulars ofemployment on the basis that he was an “employee” and that impliedterms conferred sufficient mutuality of obligation to establish a contract ofemployment. His claim was successful. The tribunal held Fuller did not workunder a series of individual engagements but under an “overarching”contract of employment. The EAT upheld this decision.Stevedoringsuccessfully appealed to the Court of Appeal. The documentation provided aframework for a series of successive ad hoc contracts and the parties’ conductwas consistent with the performance of such contracts. The tribunal erred increating an overarching contract into which mutuality of obligation could beimplied and even if there had been such a contract it was not appropriate toimply terms because these would contradict the express term that there was nomutuality of obligation. ECJguidance on equal pay claimsBrunnhofer v Bank der ”sterreichischen Postsparkasse AG, IRLB 673,September 2001, ECJBrunnhoferwas employed by the bank from 1993 to 1997. She brought an equal pay claimbecause although she received the same salary as a male colleague who wasclassified with the same grade (laid down by the applicable collectiveagreement) and who began work in 1994, she received a lower monthly paysupplement. The bank accepted her supplement was lower but contended there wereobjective reasons justifying this namely that although the two jobs wereoriginally regarded as of equal value and classified within the same grade, themale employee performed more important functions, had more responsibility andproduced better quality work.Brunnhofer’sclaim was dismissed and she appealed to the Austrian appeal court whichreferred three questions to the ECJ. First, whether employees of the same gradecould be said to be performing the same or equal value work. Second, whether itis for the employer to prove a difference in work when two workers are of thesame grade. Third, whether factors outside the collective agreement can justifypay differences.TheECJ’s decision provides useful guidance on these points. When determiningwhether two employees were performing the same or equal value work, it wasnecessary to consider a range of factors, including the nature of the work, thetraining requirements and the working conditions. Such factors are qual-itative and exclusively concerned with the nature of work. Accordingly, thefact that two employees were classified under the same grade within thecollective agreement did not mean both performed the same or equal value work.Further,the burden of proving sex discrimination in equal pay claims lies with theemployee although this burden can shift to the employer if a pay system is notsufficiently transparent to enable the employee to compare her pay with that ofthe comparator. In this case there was transparency, the bank did not deny thepay supplement differential and the burden remained with Brunnhofer. Finally,however, the bank could not rely on factors which came to light during theactual performance of Brunnhofer’s and her male colleague’s duties (such asquality of work) to justify a pay difference fixed at the time of appointmentbecause at that time, the bank could not have known whether thosejustifications existed.Effectiveuse of Tribunal and High Court proceduresSajid v Chowdhury & another, unreported October 2001, Court of AppealSajid,who was made redundant in January 1998, brought tribunal claims for unfairdismissal, redundancy pay and compensation for breach of contract for wrongfuldismissal. He recognised in his tribunal application form that the tribunal’sjurisdiction was limited to a maximum of £25,000 for breach of contract claimsand he reserved the right to rely on any findings made by the tribunal ifpursuing proceedings in another court. Sajidthen commenced High Court proceedings claiming £73,000 compensation forwrongful dismissal and withdrew this part of his tribunal claim, followingwhich it was formally dismissed.Inits defence to the High Court claim, Chowdhury contended that Sajid was barredfrom continuing because of the principle of res judicata whereby a claimantcannot bring an action in one court after it has been finally determined byanother. TheHigh Court disagreed and Chowdhury appealed to the Court of Appeal. It wasargued that because Sajid had withdrawn the wrongful dismissal claim the issuehad been “determined” by the tribunal, which prevented Sajidproceeding in the High Court. TheCourt of Appeal stated that the policy behind res judicata was that thereshould be finality of litigation and the avoidance of multiple actions. Once adecision is reached in one court it would be unfair to allow the claimant toraise the same claim before a different court. However,Sajid had always contemplated High Court proceedings because of the tribunal’slimited jurisdiction in respect of breach of contract. As there was noprocedure to transfer cases from the tribunal to the High Court, Sajid wasmerely preserving his rights. His actions actually avoided multiplicity. Furthermore,in reality none of the parties regarded the dismissal of the wrongful dismissalclaim to be a final determination but rather a transfer to the High Court wherea final determination could be given. Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Stamp Duty holiday has cost government £530 million so far

Stamp Duty holiday has cost government £530 million so far

first_imgThe Government has been arguing for months that the Chancellor’s Stamp Duty holiday must end on 31st March because it needs to get its tax raising back on track.And that is borne out by the latest SDLT figures which show the Government’s revenues from the duty, which covers all types of property, were down by £530 million during the last three months of the year.This, it says, is due largely to the stamp duty holiday for residential properties; receipts for that part of the SDLT were down by 22% on the same period of 2019.This is because during the final three-month of 2020, 34% of residential transactions were liable for SDLT compared to 66% in Q4 2019.Price portionIt could have been worse, but happily for the Chancellor his Stamp Duty holiday only includes the portion of a home’s value under £500,000. Someone buying a £600,000 home, for example will still pay 5% Stamp Duty on the £100,000 over the £500,000 threshold, or £5,000.But after 31st March, if they still haven’t completed then the same buyers would pay £15,000, or £10,000 more in stamp duty.It is not surprising that the Stamp Duty holiday has been such a shot in the arm for the housing market which HM Treasury figures show, during the last quarter of 2020, were 43% higher than the previous quarter and 16% higher than the year before.“Today’s figures clearly show the positive impact the SDLT holiday has had for the property sector and the UK economy since its introduction.“I would therefore urge the Government to consider a more gradual approach to paring back SDLT relief,” says Nick Leeming, Chairman of Jacksons-Stops (pictured). Tax expert view“These statistics demonstrate what we have known for some time, that the lower end of the market – while responsible for the majority of purchases – has a smaller impact on the overall tax take. It also reiterates the need for some kind of move to avoid a stamp duty holiday cliff-edge,” says David Hannah, Founder and Principal Consultant of Cornerstone Tax.“Calls to make the holiday permanent or scrap the tax altogether seem unrealistic given the levels of public debt and the £12 billion tax take it generates each year, but having such a strict cut-off point, particularly in such a turbulent and difficult housing market and economic climate could result in a catastrophic drop in demand and prices.“Raising to the nil-rate band, to somewhere around £300,000, will benefit the majority of buyers without affecting a large amount in tax revenues, which is obviously key to the recovery of public finances.“These statistics demonstrate the importance of keeping the market moving to other sections of the economy and first-time buyers, those likely to spend less than £300,000, are the driving force behind this movement.“Home ownership is key to the UK economy, upward mobility and the aspirations of many that are currently struggling to get on the property ladder.“Not only this but making it easier to move house without being penalised for doing so will make it easier to move to areas of growth and where jobs are. Especially important as we see a de-urbanisation and migration away from cities in the wake of the pandemic.”Jackson-stops HM Treasury HMRC Nick Leeming sdlt stamp duty February 4, 2021Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Stamp Duty holiday has cost government £530 million so far previous nextHousing MarketStamp Duty holiday has cost government £530 million so farAgents wondering why Rishi Sunak hasn’t backed down on extending the scheme yet, should take a look at the latest HMRC figures.Nigel Lewis4th February 202101,416 Viewslast_img read more

EU NAVFOR Confirms Super Tanker Safe After Attack by Suspect Pirates off Somali Coast

EU NAVFOR Confirms Super Tanker Safe After Attack by Suspect Pirates off Somali Coast

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today EU NAVFOR Confirms Super Tanker Safe After Attack by Suspect Pirates off Somali Coast EU NAVFOR Confirms Super Tanker Safe After Attack by Suspect Pirates off Somali Coast View post tag: Navy EU Naval Force confirmed that on Friday 11 October 2013, a fully laden super tanker, known as a Very Large Crude Carrier (VLCC), was fired upon by eight armed men in two ‘skiffs’ 230 miles off the Somali coast.The attack was successfully repelled by the Armed Security Team on board the super tanker and the vessel is now safe.The Maritime Security Centre (Horn of Africa), based at the EU Naval Force Operations Centre, Northwood, UK, has issued an alert about the whereabouts and nature of the attack, to warn other ships transiting the area to be vigilant.Speaking about the incident, the Operation Commander of the EU Naval Force, Rear Admiral Bob Tarrant said:“The attack this morning demonstrates that there is still a clear and present danger from pirates off the Somali coast.  It is crucial that naval counter-piracy forces maintain pressure on these criminals and that the maritime industry remains vigilant, taking appropriate precautions to deter an attack.”[mappress]Press Release, October 14, 2013; Image: EU NAVFOR View post tag: after View post tag: confirms View post tag: Somali View post tag: attack View post tag: Tanker View post tag: Suspect View post tag: NAVFOR View post tag: supercenter_img View post tag: EU View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: Pirates View post tag: Defence October 14, 2013 View post tag: Defense View post tag: coast View post tag: Safe Share this articlelast_img read more