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U.S. actions show solidarity with Palestine

U.S. actions show solidarity with Palestine

first_imgEvents around the U.S. expressed solidarity with Palestine during the first two weeks in June. Here is a sampling from WW correspondents.New York CityWithin Our Lifetime/United for Palestine held a community Iftar on June 8, Al-Quds Day, at the Solidarity Center in New York City to celebrate the Palestinian people’s right to resist until return and liberation.AtlantaMore than 100 demonstrators gathered at CNN headquarters in Atlanta for Al-Quds Day. There, they held a rally, with speakers from Christian, Islamic and Jewish organizations as well as secular solidarity groups, including the International Action Center and Jewish Voice for Peace. The rally was followed by a march through downtown Atlanta to Troy Davis (Woodruff) Park, another short rally and then a march back to CNN.A midday protest on June 5 in Milwaukee focused on the Israeli ambassador, who was speaking at the war memorial. The protesters were a multinational group, outraged that the ambassador came to peddle U.S.-Israeli genocidal lies during a luncheon. At the 3-hour protest, which began outside the war memorial building, participants chanted, “Free, free Palestine!” and other slogans loud enough to be heard clearly inside the luncheon. The protesters then moved to where those who attended the luncheon were exiting the parking lot and chanted, “Shame!” for their complicity in the slaughter of Palestinians and in the U.S.-Israeli theft of Palestinian lands. Numerous labor, community, peace and anti-war organizations united to publicize and participate in the protest.Portland, OregonMembers of the Workers World Party Portland, Ore., branch organized a demonstration June 8 in response to the Palestinians’ call for support of their ongoing anti-colonialist struggle. Demonstrators joined an event for housing justice and were given a platform to speak. They condemned the deliberate murders of medic Razan al-Najjar on June 1 and journalist Rachel Corrie on March 16, 2003.Bill Dores, Jimmy Raynor and Joshua Hanks contributed to this article.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Hundreds rally, march against racist violence

Hundreds rally, march against racist violence

first_imgCleveland, March 28.Hundreds of Clevelanders from the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities, along with multinational allies, rallied in the Asia Town neighborhood March 28. Sponsors of the “Stop Asian hate” rally were the Cleveland chapter of the Organization of Chinese Americans, Ohio Progressive Asian Women’s Leadership, Asian Services in Action, Asian Pacific Islander Public Affairs and Asia Town Cleveland.The rally was one of dozens held across the U.S. the weekend of March 27-28, some called by community groups and many by the Answer coalition, demanding an end to racially motivated attacks targeting Asians, Asian Americans and Pacific IslandersSpeakers, who addressed the crowd in Mandarin, Cantonese and English, represented the sponsoring organizations as well as the InterReligious Task Force on Central America, the arts collective Shooting Without Bullets, and City Council Ward 7 which includes Asia Town. Dr. Shemariah J. Arki of the Ellipsis Institute for Women of Color in the Academy led everyone in Assata Shakur’s chant: “We are determined to fight for our freedom. We are determined to win. We must love and support each other. We have nothing to lose but our chains.” A march through Asia Town followed the rally. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Indiana Crops Continue Improvment

Indiana Crops Continue Improvment

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Crops Continue Improvment Indiana Crops Continue Improvment Previous articleNCGA’s Woodall Expects Farm Bill ExtensionNext articleUS Crop Condition Remains Solid Gary Truitt SHARE By Gary Truitt – Jul 8, 2013 Rain showers, across most of the state, kept wheatharvest to a minimum during the week, according to theIndiana Field Office of USDA’s National AgriculturalStatistics Service. Producers are worried thatexcessive moisture will soon begin to take its toll on thewinter wheat crop if they are not able to finish harvestsoon. Farmers are hoping for drier conditions to notonly finish wheat harvest but to also bale straw andplant double crop soybeans. Moderate temperaturesand ample soil moisture allowed the corn crop to makerapid growth with a few scattered fields beginning totassel.There were 2.8 days suitable for field work during theweek. Corn condition improved slightly and is rated81 percent good to excellent compared with 12 percentlast year at this time.Ninety-eight percent of the soybean acreage hasemerged compared with 100 percent last year and 97percent for the 5-year average. Nine percent of thesoybean acreage is blooming compared with 42percent last year and 20 percent for the 5-yearaverage. Soybean condition is rated 75 percent goodto excellent compared with 14 percent last year at thistime.Thirty-two percent of the winter wheat acreage hasbeen harvested compared with 98 percent last yearand 69 percent for the 5-year average. Winter wheatcondition is rated 76 percent good to excellent at thistime.LIVESTOCK, PASTURE AND RANGE REPORTLivestock remained in mostly good condition.Pasture condition improved and is rated 84 percentgood to excellent compared with only 2 percent lastyear at this time. The second cutting of alfalfa is 19percent complete compared with 93 percent last yearand 43 percent for the 5-year average. SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Open House Episode 13: Liliana Ogden

Open House Episode 13: Liliana Ogden

first_imgFacebook ReddIt Twitter Logo for SGA’s Open House podcast + posts Open House Episode 15: Alexis Berry World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Open House Episode 7: Alex Colig ReddIt Kai Gradyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kai-grady/ Open House: Finale Open House Episode 14: Delaina Bellows Previous articleA new hope: No. 10 TCU proves they’re the real deal after opening day strugglesNext articleHoroscope: February 22, 2021 Kai Grady RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Kai Gradyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kai-grady/center_img printWelcome back to Open House for our first episode of the new year. This week, Kyle has the pleasure of interviewing SGA Vice President, Liliana Ogden. Topics include everything from favorite movie and sports team to the intricacies of the VP position. Hope you enjoy!Interview conducted by Kyle AtwoodProduced by Kai Grady Linkedin Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Kai Gradyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kai-grady/ Kai Grady Twitter Linkedin Kai Gradyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kai-grady/ Kai Grady is an FTDM and Journalism double-major from Arlington, Texas. He currently works at KTCU as a Hip-Hop DJ. After graduating, he hopes to pursue a career in both sports and popular culture writing. Facebook TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history TAGSSGATCU last_img read more

Handshake could land firms in court

Handshake could land firms in court

first_img Comments are closed. Handshake could land firms in courtOn 8 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Employersshould not necessarily expect all job interviewees to shake hands, as it couldcause offence and breach laws which come into force in December.Insistingon a handshake could leave the interviewer’s organisation open to a claim ofdiscrimination from devout followers of Judaism and Islam, according to areport from the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD).Thereport, Tackling Religious Discrimination: An introduction to the law, alsowarns that serving alcohol without a non-alcoholic option at work functionscould invite a claim under the new European laws.Tocomply with EU law, the UK must introduce new legislation on religiousdiscrimination by 2 December 2003 to make it illegal to discriminate on the groundsof religion or belief in the workplace.  TheCIPD has published guidance to encourage employers to think about thecomplexities and to help them recognise the need for action over theforthcoming Employment Equality (Religion or Belief) Regulations.DianahWorman, CIPD diversity adviser, said the implications of the new legislationwere enormous for employers, given that compensation awarded to an employee (orwould-be employee) who wins their case is unlimited.Oneparticular problem facing employers is the potentially wide definition of whatamounts to a belief. Wormansaid: “The Government needs to produce guidance as quickly as possible toaddress many of the concerns highlighted in the report.  With just six months left before theregulations become law, the clock is ticking loudly for those organisationswishing to prepare for such a major and far-reaching piece of legislation.”ByBen willmottwww.cipd.org.ukHRfactfileThereport recommends:–Ask employees what their requirements are and, where appropriate, whether theywould like to set up an advisory body on religion and belief –Review all policies and procedures, from recruitment to appraisal and holidayarrangements –Give managers diversity training and provide them with guidelines on how todeal with workplace issues–Ensure dignity at work policies cover harassment on the grounds of religion orbelief and that these are drawn to the attention of all employeesSource:CIPD Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Life hung by a thread: endurance of Antarctic fauna in glacial periods

Life hung by a thread: endurance of Antarctic fauna in glacial periods

first_imgToday, Antarctica exhibits some of the harshest environmental conditions for life on Earth. During the last glacial period, Antarctic terrestrial and marine life was challenged by even more extreme environmental conditions. During the present interglacial period, polar life in the Southern Ocean is sustained mainly by large-scale primary production. We argue that during the last glacial period, faunal populations in the Antarctic were limited to very few areas of local marine productivity (polynyas), because complete, multiannual sea-ice and ice shelf coverage shut down most of the Southern Ocean productivity within today’s seasonal sea-ice zone. Both marine sediments containing significant numbers of planktonic and benthic foraminifera and fossil bird stomach oil deposits in the adjacent Antarctic hinterland provide indirect evidence for the existence of polynyas during the last glacial period. We advocate that the existence of productive oases in the form of polynyas during glacial periods was essential for the survival of marine and most higher-trophic terrestrial fauna. Reduced to such refuges, much of today’s life in the high Antarctic realm might have hung by a thread during the last glacial period, because limited resources available to the food web restricted the abundance and productivity of both Antarctic terrestrial and marine life.last_img read more

Zero Deposit CEO steps down four years after co-founding firm

Zero Deposit CEO steps down four years after co-founding firm

first_imgHome » News » Zero Deposit CEO steps down four years after co-founding firm previous nextProducts & ServicesZero Deposit CEO steps down four years after co-founding firmJon Notley is to be replaced by the company’s marketing chief Sam Reynolds, who has revealed fresh funding including from new investor 50-branch estate agency, Andrews.Nigel Lewis13th October 202001,019 Views Jon Notely (above, left), the co-founder of tenancy platform Zero Deposit, has stepped down as CEO of the business as it reveals new funding from the tech firm’s existing backers but also additional funds from the UK’s leading independent estate agency Andrews.The 50-branch agency, which is already a distributor of Zero Deposits products, joins existing shareholders from within the industry including Connells, LSL, Acorn Group, Knight Frank and Zoopla.The government has also chipped in with funds from its Future Fund, which is designed primarily to help tech companies get through the Covid pandemic.Notley says he is to step back from leading the company and take a non-executive role.TDPG connectionSam Reynolds (above, right), the firm’s marketing chief, is to take over Notley’s CEO duties. Notley and Reynolds have worked together before during the late noughties crossing paths at TDPG, the company that owned PrimeLocation.com and the now disappeared Findaproperty.com before they were merged with Zoopla.Notley says: “The last four years have been an amazing experience, with us stamping Zero Deposit as the clear market leader in the fast developing deposit replacement market.“I would like to take this opportunity to thank my team, all of our investors – now including Andrews – and our partners who have helped us to get where we are today.“Sam was the obvious choice to steer Zero Deposit through the next exciting chapter of our story; bringing a wealth of senior marketing, product and commercial experience from a number of high growth businesses.”Read more about the alternative deposit sector.Visit Zero Deposit.Sam Reynolds primelocation.com Jon Notley zero deposit October 13, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

Bhajis, bacteria, and bicycles: inside crew date kitchens

Bhajis, bacteria, and bicycles: inside crew date kitchens

first_imgOxford’s major crew date locations contravened multiple food hygiene regulations in their most recent inspections, Cherwell can reveal, with food storage, allergen risks, and dilapidated kitchens collectively the areas of greatest concern.Cherwell obtained copies of the most recent hygiene food hygiene reports from At Thai, Jamal’s, and The Temple Lounge through Oxford City Council, all of which highlighted issues regarding hygiene, cleaning, and confidence in the restaurants’ management.At Thai were found to be in breach of twelve legal requirements during their inspection in July last year. These included dirty hand contacts around the kitchen, concern about food being stored on the floor, as well as being chilled at 9°C in the walk-in fridge, which is higher than the permitted temperature in the UK. They were also instructed to deep clean their bin area and pest proof the restaurant, as well as being given six months to replace the kitchen floor, with the hygiene inspector describing it as “old, worn and cracked in places”.Meanwhile Jamal’s on Walton Street, still known as Arzoo’s by many, breached seven legal requirements, with the inspector suggesting a cleaning of the walls and floors in the rear function room, as well as of their kitchen equipment. The same venue closed back in 2012 because of food hygiene concerns, though is now under new ownership. Both Jamal’s and At Thai were awarded an overall score of satisfactory.The Temple Lounge in Cowley fared slightly better, receiving a four-star food hygiene rating, the same as the Randolph Hotel in its most recent report. Despite this, they were still told to remove their staircase carpet, with the inspector describing it as beyond cleaning. They were also instructed to deep clean and repaint the walls and ceiling in the kitchen.Creasian on St. Giles came under fire for grease dripping from the kitchen canopy, which they were told to get professionally cleaned. The inspector also expressed concern about a bicycle in the kitchen. The restaurant has since ceased trading.A representative of a renounced women’s drinking society told Cherwell:“Although crew dates effectively pay to be rowdy, £15 should cover more than three naan breads and a bad curry. With white tablecloths to cover leftover food, uncomfortable chairs, and never enough cups or plates, the crew date scene is in dire need of an upgrade.”last_img read more

COA Slashes Disability Damages, Voids State Code, Gives Bench Slaps

COA Slashes Disability Damages, Voids State Code, Gives Bench Slaps

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Portions of the Indiana Administrative Code were voided by an Indiana Court of Appeals decision in a disability discrimination suit in which the appeals court also substantially reduced a damages award to a fired worker and criticized counsel for incivility and citing outdated regulations.The Court of Appeals’ 40-page ruling in Knox County Association for Retarded Citizens, Inc. v. Melissa (Cope) Davis, 93A02-1701-EX-141, found that Melissa (Cope) Davis had been discriminated against on the basis of disability, but that an award by the Indiana Civil Rights Commission was excessive. The COA also ruled that portions of the IAC were in conflict with the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and the Code of Federal Regulations and were therefore void.Davis was fired from her position as a direct support professional at KCARC in 2012 after she had previously left work for an unknown medical issue and was diagnosed as having a loss of consciousness or “syncopal episode.” She later was released to work with restrictions including only light duties and jobs that required mostly sitting. She was fired after KCARC staff said there were no positions that met the work restrictions.Davis then filed a discrimination complaint with the ICRC, and in 2016, she was awarded back damages of more than $25,800, plus prejudgment interest for a total award of more than $35,100.The COA affirmed the ICRC’s discrimination finding in its opinion but reversed the damages award based on Davis’ failure to mitigate her losses through her subsequent employment. The COA said she proved damages of $6,202.28, and the panel remanded for a determination of prejudgment interest to be added to that sum.But the panel also found that state regulators’ code was outdated and void. Citing 910 IAC § 3-2-15(b) (2013), Judge Melissa May wrote for the panel that “the definitions for determining disability under the IAC have not been modified to account for the changes produced by enactment” of the ADA.“Because Indiana Code section 22-9-5-27 requires the portions of the IAC dealing with employment discrimination against disabled people not conflict with the ADA, the current version of the IAC is invalid and we cannot rely on it,” May wrote.“We conclude the portions of the IAC that do not comport with the language of the ADA and the CFR are invalid,” she said.The panel then applied the ADA to affirm the determination that Davis had a qualifying disability. The panel also affirmed the finding that KCARC did not engage in the requisite interactive process with Davis of determining whether a reasonable accommodation was available.Meanwhile, the panel called out the incivility of counsel and the outdated administrative code both sides relied on in this case.“(W)e would like to note the lack of civility between the parties in this case, both in their briefs and during oral argument,” May wrote in a footnote. “Unnecessarily argumentative and snide comments such as, ‘Of course, the fact that Davis can’t seem to consistently state the nature of her alleged disability is because she doesn’t suffer from one[,]’ … and ‘had the Commission actually bothered to read the case they cited in support of their conclusion that Davis is disabled, they would have discovered that it actually stands for the exact opposite of their assertion,’ … as well as conduct during the oral argument, degrade the parties’ arguments by showcasing the incivility between the parties.“We remind counsel of sections 1 and 9 of the Preamble to the Indiana Rules of Professional Conduct, which state: ‘Whether or not engaging in the practice of law, lawyers should conduct themselves honorably[;]’ and ‘[The principles of the Rules of Professional Responsibility] include the lawyer’s obligation to protect and pursue a client’s legitimate interests, within the bounds of the law, while maintaining a professional, courteous and civil attitude toward all persons involved in the legal system,’” May continued.In a separate footnote, the court wrote, “We find it unsettling that neither party recognized this difference between the current version of the (Code of Federal Regulations) and the current version of the IAC, which do not comport. Further, Davis, who is represented by ICRC, cited the 2007 version of the CFR, which has been invalid for a decade. … In addition to this inexplicable error, Davis’ brief is replete with citations that seem to be to the record, but do not indicate whether the material is from the appendices or transcripts. This failure to properly cite the record has greatly hindered our review of this very complex record.” DAVE STAFFORD for www.theindianalawyer.comlast_img read more

Food in the news

Food in the news

first_imgMeat is the world’s deadliest drug, according to The Daily Mail, following claims by scientists in the US that junk food containing high levels of fat, sugar and salt can trigger the same cravings as Class A drugs. “Our brains produce a feeling of pleasure after that first hit of nutritionally dubious rubbish and then it takes more and more of the stuff to repeat that initial high,” writes Janet Street-Porter.Consumers around the world want to eat more healthily and buy food that is grown, raised and produced in responsible ways. However, when money is tight, they often turn to products that offer the best value whether they’re healthy and environmentally responsible or not. These were the findings of a global online poll of more than 27,000 consumers by The Nielsen Company found that while financial concerns (33%) were a major obstacle to healthy eating, the biggest barrier was a perceived time crunch for survey respondents, with 35% of consumers agreeing to the statement, ’I don’t always eat healthily because I haven’t got time’.Sainsbury’s is recalling its Freefrom Rich Fruit Cake Slices with a best before date of 4 November 2010, because the product contains low levels of wheat gluten. The Food Standards Agency said this made the product a possible health risk to anyone with a gluten intolerance or an allergy to or intolerance of wheat, and has issued an allergy alert.Sainsbury’s is recalling the affected product from customers and has contacted allergy support organisations. Notices will be displayed in all stores, explaining to customers why it has been recalled.last_img read more