Saint Mary’s bans ‘hoverboards’ and drones

Saint Mary’s bans ‘hoverboards’ and drones

first_imgFollowing many college and universities across America, the Saint Mary’s administration made the decision to add drones and electronic self-balancing skateboards known as “hoverboards” to the list of prohibited items on campus. A drone is a remote-controlled, pilotless aircraft that has become commercialized in recent years which can be used for many purposes ranging from photography to Amazon deliveries. Karen Johnson, the vice president of student affairs, said she led a group of people on campus who made the decision in order to protect student safety. “The drone issue is that we are right on the take-off and landing pattern of the [South Bend] airport,” Johnson said. “The fire issue [with ‘hoverboards’] is a big concern. We did not want an item in the residence hall or in a building that could catch on fire when nobody was around to see it happen.”Assistant vice president for student affairs Janielle Tchakerian said the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) mandates the rules regarding the drones. “FAA prohibits drone operators to stay out of airport flight paths and restricted airspace areas, and obey any FAA Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs),” Tchakerian said. “Since Saint Mary’s College is in the flight path to the South Bend airport, we wanted to inform our students that for the safety of the manned aircrafts flying above our campus that drones are prohibited.”Though the fire concerns with “hoverboards” and the airport regulations regarding drones have not been an issue on campus, Johnson said the administration is acting proactively on the matter. Saint Mary’s students received an email outlining the new prohibitions before leaving campus for winter break.“When ‘hoverboards’ become more safe or they solve the problems with the batteries, we may permit them,” Johnson said. “We have skateboards all over campus now, bicycles, skates, all that.”Johnson said there is no set procedure for cases in which students are found with these items, but she would ask the student to take the item home as soon as possible or the College would confiscate the item and put it in a safe place until the student can take it home. Tchakerian said the decision to prohibit the items ultimately ensures the safety of everyone on campus.“[The rules] benefit the entire Saint Mary’s community because, by implementing these two policies, we are putting the safety of our community members — both on campus and those who fly above us — safer.”A comprehensive list of items prohibited on campus can be found on the College’s website. Tags: drones, electronic skateboards, hoverboardslast_img read more

Notre Dame ranked among top Fulbright producers

Notre Dame ranked among top Fulbright producers

first_imgFor the second consecutive year, Notre Dame has been on The Chronicle of Higher Education’s Fulbright U.S. Student Program Top Producing List. Fourteen students have received Fulbright grants for the 2015-2016 program and have been given chances to pursue their academic passions and inquiries in countries such as Brazil, Senegal, Italy and more.Mae Kilker, a Medieval Institute graduate student and native of South Bend, is a Fulbright recipient currently studying and conducting research in Sweden.“My research explores how people from the Medieval Ages understood the physical environment — and not only the way that they experience that, but also how they told stories about it,” Kilker said. “The reason I’m in Sweden is my particular field is looking at Anglo-Saxon England, but the current scholarship is to understand the North Atlantic cultural sphere as a whole because England was settled by Scandinavian-Germanic tribes.”Kilker said she has always had a passion for the Middle Ages because of its language and poetry, and it was this passion that inspired her to apply for the Fulbright program. She said she hopes that completion of the program will bring her closer to a career in academia.“In addition to just being able to have a year in Sweden and do my research and connect with scholars in my field, it has actually brought me to other opportunities such as postdocs and publication,” Kilker said.Mike Westrate, associate program director for the Office of Grants and Fellowships, works in the graduate school to help graduate and undergraduate students distill their research into written form in order to apply for grants and fellowships.“I have always said that there are two sort of gateway fellowships and that you can use your application materials to apply,” he said. “The first of those is the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and the second is the Fulbright Program.”Westrate, a Fulbright recipient himself, went to Ukraine in 2010 and 2011 for the program. He was the only graduate student to go on the Fulbright that year.“Having been a Fulbrighter myself, I can tell you that a year of research or study abroad is a life changing experience,” Westrate said. “Furthermore, doing that year abroad as a Fulbrighter is even more rewarding. You get to tap into the world’s largest international network of scholars.”Westrate said this year Notre Dame has an award rate exactly equal to Harvard, which is the top-producing Fulbright award university in the country.“Notre Dame students are some of the best students in the world, and when properly assisted they’re also some of the most successful students in the world,” Westrate said. “Other schools have much higher student populations and not only does it say that our students are successful, but that our students apply at a much higher rate.”He said aside from the academic opportunities that the Fulbright program offers its scholars, the professional and scholarly alumni network is yet another benefit. Westrate said since the mid-1940s, the Fulbright program has brought between 10,000 and 12,000 students to the United States from all over the world.The instant students decide they might want to apply for a Fulbright, they should meet with the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE), Westrate said.Kilker said the application process was writing intensive and having ties to the community worked in the applicant’s favor.“The more you can do ahead of time to create those relationships and create that project idea, the sooner you can hit the ground running,” Kilker said. “Getting help from other people to read your materials and give you feedback makes your applications so much better. Be prepared to write and rewrite, five, six and seven times — it will be better each time.”Tags: Fulbright, fulbright program, The Chronicle of Higher Educationlast_img read more

One person wounded in shooting on Eddy Street Commons

One person wounded in shooting on Eddy Street Commons

first_imgA shooting occurred near the Five Guys on Eddy Street Commons early Sunday morning according to a report from the South Bend Tribune. One person was wounded and walked to the hospital with a potential gunshot wound. The injury was “non-life-threatening,” according to the report.A large crowd was present nearby when the shooting occurred, according to the report, and a suspect has not been identified at this time. Those who may have information pertaining to the incident are encouraged to contact the South Bend Police Department, which can be reached at 574-235-9201. Witnesses may also call Crime Stoppers at 288-STOP.Tags: Eddy Street, Eddy Street Commons, Five Guy’s, Shootinglast_img

University appoints information technology vice president, chief information officer

University appoints information technology vice president, chief information officer

first_imgJohn Gohsman, vice chancellor for information technology (IT) and chief information officer (CIO) at Washington University in St. Louis, will serve as Notre Dame’s new vice president for IT and as its CIO, the University announced in a press release Wednesday. Gohsman will take over the position from Ron Kraemer, who announced in February he will be retiring.“John has a long and distinguished career in information technology at major research universities, and we look forward to him bringing his knowledge and expertise to Notre Dame,” John Affleck-Graves, the University’s executive vice president, said in the release. “Ron Kraemer has developed an exceptional team and culture, and I have every confidence that John will carry on in that tradition.”With a bachelor’s degree in business data processing from Ferris State University, Gohsman spent 30 years leading the University of Michigan in adopting academic and administrative analytics and managing various innovative IT projects before joining Washington University’s faculty as its first CIO in 2013, the release said.As an expert in “strategic planning, IT governance, program, project and change management, and administrative, academic and business intelligence systems,” Gohsman will be responsible for overseeing IT infrastructure and developing enterprise systems, the release said.“[My wife] Mary and I are looking forward to joining the Notre Dame family,” Gohsman said. “Notre Dame has a strong reputation in academics, research and information technology. I look forward to building on the solid foundation, continuing the strong collaborative approach Ron has established, and working with an excellent and innovative OIT organization to further the mission of the University.”Tags: chief information officer, information technology, John Gohsman, Ron Kraemer, vice president for information technologylast_img read more

Panel discusses Uyghur humanitarian crisis, steps for activism

Panel discusses Uyghur humanitarian crisis, steps for activism

first_imgThe Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies hosted an engaging panel Monday with experts from institutes around the world entitled “Xinjiang and the Uyghurs: Religion, Oppression and Geopolitics.” The discussion focused on the genocide and forced labor of the Uyghur population in Xinjiang and around China, and what the world needs to do to take on the human rights violations.The event started off with Mahan Mirza, the executive director of the Ansari Institute for Global Engagement with Religion and Liu Institute faculty fellow, who was the moderator for the event. Each of the panelists spoke for about ten minutes about Uyghur minorities and the current crisis. The first panelist to speak was Rachel Harris, a professor of ethnomusicology at SOAS University of London. Harris began by talking about her nearly 20 years of travel to the Xinjiang Uyghur autonomous region. She explained how the area has always been under tight control, and she’s been afraid of the police and bureaucracy. Over the past couple of years, however, Harris has felt the situation becoming even more extreme. She talked about the genocides and forced labor the Uyghur people have gone through. “We need to keep raising awareness and putting pressure on international organizations to respond to this issue,” Harris said. “And we’ve seen enough alarming reports on the drastic birth control policies, and the uprooting of communities that this is a deliberate policy of erasing Uyghur culture and identity. … These are human rights abuses on a massive scale.”Harris then went on to focus on the idea of culture and cultural heritage, specifically within the context of the cultural genocide and massive destruction of the Uyghurs’ heritage by the Chinese government. Speaking specifically of the Autumn festival, a large event and religious tradition that would happen every year in which the Uyghurs pray to the saints, Harris said this festival was bulldozed and closed down by the Chinese government and labeled as a “terrorist gathering.” “It’s interesting to reflect on why exactly they would do that,” Harris said. “Why they would go to the trouble of bringing these bulldozers deep into the desert to knock over this brick building? And really, the only answer I can think of, is that they want to cut off from the culture and erase all traces of their history from the landscape.” James Millward, the second panelist, is a professor of intersocietal history at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Millward spoke about the prison camps, re-education camps, sterilization and forced labor by the Chinese government placed on the Uyghur Muslims. He also discussed the interplay between the Chinese Communist Party and the United States government.The third panelist, Perin Gürel, associate professor of American studies at the University of Notre Dame, discussed international responses to the Uyghur crisis, focusing on the Islamic world and Turkey in particular. She said Turkey has been the only Islamic country to eventually speak out, which speaks a great deal to the implications of human rights and politics, and the constructed nature of state identities.  “All in all, I think it behooves us to examine which states are being called to condemn the actions of which states, and why, and by whom instead of assuming a normative Muslim unity, it is helpful to see the mobilizations, and limits of this concept,” Gürel said.The panel then moved to a question period, where the panelists were asked what college students can do to help the Uyghurs. Gürel spoke about the concept of fake news and polarized political bubbles.“I think maybe one step is being aware of the warping of reality” Gürel said. “Everywhere, including in the United States and including places we might think reality thrives like places of higher education.”Harris said that because of how often disheartening news comes out of the region, it is tempting to be pessimistic.  “Still, I think that’s not a reason to stop speaking out right and stop educating,“ Harris said. “There are always ways to put on pressure and all pressure has to be good.”The panel concluded with Millward discussing the effect college students can have as consumers on producer choices, from avoiding shopping at stores and buying brands that use Uyghur labor to not watching the new live action film “Mulan” on Disney Plus, as the film thanked organizations within the Chinese government that are oppressing the Uyghurs.Tags: panel, The Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies, Uyghur genocidelast_img read more

New SMC voter initiative encourages students to participate in 2020 election

New SMC voter initiative encourages students to participate in 2020 election

first_imgTo celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the 19th Amendment — giving women the right to vote — Saint Mary’s faculty and staff are creating the “100@100” campaign to encourage eligible students to vote in this year’s general election.Thomas Bonnell, professor and a 100@100 organizer, explained his thought process behind proposing the idea to the College.“In this hundred anniversary year, I thought it would be a worthwhile goal for a women’s college like Saint Mary’s to set a really high aim of at least going for 100% participation in the voting process for those who are eligible to vote,” he said. “We have some international students and there are some students who aren’t old enough. So, there are some who cannot vote, but [we are] trying to get everybody who is eligible to vote involved in the process.”Courtesy of the 100@100 Campaign Rebekah Go, director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement (OCSE) and a 100@100 organizer, reflected on the importance of voting after historically oppressed groups struggled to receive suffrage.“[I]n the case of some people such as women and people of color, having the opportunity to participate in the process came at a cost,” Go said. “We honor those who fought for the right for us to vote by thoughtfully participating in the process at every opportunity.”Bonnell hopes to energize the student population to participate in the voting process, especially because of nationwide political apathy.“[It] will take a bit of ingenuity on our part to come up with ways of making it fun and exciting for students to actually sign onto because, frankly, in our society, there’s significant amount of apathy, a significant amount of cynicism,” Bonnell said. “And we have to, to the best of our ability, try to overcome those disincentives for participating in the process.”Go stated that 100@100 has many events planned for students to engage in before Election Day.“Over 30 campus-wide events are planned for fall 2020,” Go said. “This includes tabling for voter registration and absentee ballot assistance, voter education events such as lectures and talks, and civil discourse initiatives to increase political discourse on campus in a way that promotes healthy dialogue across ideological differences.”Bonnell overviewed the plans for the words of the 19th Amendment to displayed around campus to encourage students to register to vote.“The text of the 19th amendment will be put up phrase by phrase … and then we’ll move those banners around campus from place to place and have them there as a reminder for students to register and ultimately to vote,” he said.In addition, Bonnell noted that there will be other references to important events in voter history on display.“Alongside that text will be some other banners contextualizing the sort of the ongoing efforts,” he said. “So, one might perhaps read the Voting Rights Act of 1965 …[O]ther milestones are reminders that we’re actually still working to secure voting rights for all US citizens.”The campaign will also be hosting a voter registration drive on voter registration day. However, Bonnell reminds students that they can register any time before their state’s designated deadline.“Next Tuesday is Voter Registration Day, so there will be tables up for that,” he said. “But, you know, that’s one day and, as I say, we just need to keep people signing up to vote, whether it’s here in Indiana or at home through absentee ballots. Because, you know, I won’t say time is running out, but time is short.” Go emphasized that everyone is impacted by the choices of lawmakers, so voting is a critical part of having a say in what elected officials decide.“Any individual who has complained about a pothole or is frustrated by snow removal in January has a stake in the election because allocation of resources are decided by elected bodies,” she said. “This is true in a city or town as much as it is true on the federal level. Participating in the electoral process via voting is one of the most consequential ways an individual can influence those decisions.” Go also stated that voters should learn about important issues on all levels of government.“Once individuals familiarize themselves with the mechanics of voting, it’s important that they educate themselves on the issues — on a local, state, and national level,” Go said. “Some people can become myopic — only focusing on the federal election — but there are many important races being run at all levels. Knowing how to vote is the first step, but deciding who to vote for is where the rubber meets the road.”Bonnell acknowledged the importance of young people voting, as they make up the largest demographic in this year’s election.“If 18 to 24-year-olds show up to vote, you will elect the president, the senators, members of Congress, members of the State House, governors,” Bonnell said. “You can outvote any and all other demographics at this point, including Baby Boomers.”Because of this, Bonnell stresses that college students get out to vote so they can influence politics for their generation.“Get as many people of your age to vote as possible,” he said. “Because you guys need to shape the world that you’re going to grow up in.”Tags: 100@100, 2020 election season, Office for Civic and Social Engagement, Voter turnoutlast_img read more

Four Duck Hunters Rescued From Chautaqua Lake After Boat Overturns

Four Duck Hunters Rescued From Chautaqua Lake After Boat Overturns

first_imgChautauqua Lake Stock Image.BEMUS POINT – Four duck hunters are expected to recover after they were rescued by first responders when their boat overturned in Chautaqua Lake early Saturday.The Chautaqua County Sheriff’s Office says around 6 a.m. a person ashore called 911 when they heard distress calls coming from the lake near Bemus Point.Sheriff’s Deputies and members of the Chautauqua County Wet Emergency Team arrived on scene within five minutes for a search.They discovered that a 15′ outboard vessel for waterfowl hunting had overturned, leaving four hunters in the water for approximately 30 minutes. All four were experiencing symptoms of hypothermia and unable to swim. Only one person was wearing a flotation device at the time.Deputies were able to swim out and bring in two men. The Bemus Point and Ellery Center Volunteer Fire Departments used watercraft to rescue the remaining two.The four are identified as Daniel Auria, Jonathan Bellardo, Matthew Calimeri, and Howard Talbot, all of Chautauqua County.They were taken to UPMC Chautauqua Hospital for treatment of hypothermia symptoms and are expected to recover fully. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

OMFG! ‘Meryl F**king Streep’ Drops In to Wish Outside Mullingar Star Debra Messing Good Luck

OMFG! ‘Meryl F**king Streep’ Drops In to Wish Outside Mullingar Star Debra Messing Good Luck

first_img Star Files Debra Messing Related Shows View Comments Emmy winner Debra Messing said it best: “MERYL F**KING STREEP.” I mean, honestly, what else is there to say? Here’s how the story goes… Messing, who is making her Broadway debut in John Patrick Shanley’s Outside Mullingar, was in her dressing room one fine evening when a very special guest—wait, I’m sorry—the specialest of special guests stopped by to congratulate the star. Naturally, Messing freaked the freak out and did the world a favor by taking a photo of her and the one-and-only Goddess of Modern Cinema. Streep, who just received a record-breaking 18th Oscar nod for her role as Violet Weston in the film adaptation of Tracy Letts’ August: Osage County, looks downright chic in her glittery pashmina. Also, Messing looks appropriately ecstatic next to her, beaming, quite possibly, the biggest smile we’ve ever seen. She even hashtagged her photo with #dead and #cantspeak. We get it, Debs. Believe us, we get it. First of all, these two need to star in something together ASAP. Then, you all need to take after Queen Meryl and go check out Debra Messing, opposite Tony winner Brían F. O’Byrne, in Outside Mullingar, opening January 23 at the Friedman Theatre. Outside Mullingar Show Closed This production ended its run on March 16, 2014last_img read more

Idina Menzel Proves Print Isn’t Dead with Sold Out Billboard Cover

Idina Menzel Proves Print Isn’t Dead with Sold Out Billboard Cover

first_imgIt’s disappearing off the racks faster than you can say “Adele Dazeem!” According to a tweet by Janice Min, Billboard Chief Creative Officer and Co-President of Entertainment Group, the issue featuring If/Then star and Frozen queen Idina Menzel on the cover is the first issue of the magazine this year to sell out the Billboard store online. The stunning Hot Shot of Menzel is in high demand as the number of “Fanzels” across the country skyrockets. If you’re lucky enough to have snagged a copy already, don’t “Let It Go,” as these may be hard to come by now! Show Closed This production ended its run on March 22, 2015 Idina Menzel Star Files View Comments If/Then Related Showslast_img read more

Legendary Broadway Hotspot Cafe Edison Will Shut Its Doors

Legendary Broadway Hotspot Cafe Edison Will Shut Its Doors

first_img View Comments Hotel Edison General Manager Richard Hotter said in a statement, “For over thirty years, Hotel Edison and its ownership has enjoyed a wonderful, productive relationship with the Edison Cafe. We can confirm that the Café is closing as the hotel prepares to upgrade and restore the space. In the coming months, we are excited to reveal further details about our plans for this iconic location.” The coffee shop has a rich history with Broadway theatergoers and insiders alike. August Wilson drafted three scripts on its napkins. Neil Simon referred to the hotspot as “something magical.” His 2001 comedy 45 Seconds from Broadway was inspired by his affection for the restaurant. Following the death of owner Harry Edelstein in 2009, Broadway theaters dimmed their marquees to pay tribute. The Edison Hotel has also shut down the original Rum House bar in 2010 and Sofia’s Italian restaurant in 2013. Conrad Strohl, the cafe’s manager, did say that they are looking to relocate. However, it will difficult to replace the sentiment of the ornate columns, powder blue ceilings and the juxtaposition of chandeliers paired with neon signs. After 34 years, Cafe Edison, a beloved destination for the Broadway community, has locked its doors for good. According to Vanishing New York, the midtown coffee shop, also known as the Polish Tea Room to its frequent inhabitants, will close shop at the Hotel Edison in the near future, as the building does not intend to renew the cafe’s lease.last_img read more