Traditional Inuit songs once banned during colonialism focus of new course

Traditional Inuit songs once banned during colonialism focus of new course

first_imgIQALUIT, Nunavut – Ancient Inuit drum songs once banned as part of colonialism are being given renewed attention during a course in Nunavut next month.The Qaggiavuut Society says it will hold a five-day class on Pisiit, part of a broader effort to connect elders with the next generation of performers, in hopes of exposing the style of music to other Nunavut communities.Pisiit has struggled to survive over the years after the drum songs were banned by Christian missionaries for being too rooted in Inuit spirituality, the organizers said.The course will be taught in Inuktut without translation by eight elders from various regions of the territory. Vocal techniques and performance skills will be taught by Inuktitut singer-songwriter Looee Arreak and Juno winner Susan Aglukark, known for her 1995 single “O Siem.”The Pisiit course runs from Aug. 6 to 10 in Iqaluit.Exposing the music to more people is an initiative launched last year by the Qaggiq Performing Arts School, a partnership with the National Theatre School of Canada and the National Theatre School of Greenland.Classes will culminate on Aug. 9 in an evening performance of songs that haven’t been heard in public for over 50 years.Follow @dfriend on Twitter.last_img read more

Edmonton police say girl who was subject of Amber Alert found safe

Edmonton police say girl who was subject of Amber Alert found safe

first_imgEDMONTON – Edmonton police say officers took a suspect into custody 20 minutes after issuing an Amber Alert Friday that a teenage girl had been forcibly abducted by a man who could be armed and dangerous.The 14-year-old girl was found unharmed and was being interviewed by child protection officers.Police said that a 47-year-man was being held at police headquarters as part of an investigation into an alleged abduction.The man’s name was not released, but earlier Friday police identified the suspect as Jacques Sennesael.According to police, students from a school told a police officer about a suspicious man talking to a girl around 3 p.m.There were also reports that the man had a gun and forced the girl into a car.Police said they then issued the Amber Alert.A few minutes later police said they got a phone call from a witness who reported the direction the car was driving in.Police said it was that tip that allowed officers to quickly find the girl and the suspect.There was no word on charges.last_img read more

Attempt to appeal 60s Scoop settlement tossed for extreme lack of evidence

Attempt to appeal 60s Scoop settlement tossed for extreme lack of evidence

first_imgTORONTO – A last-ditch effort to challenge the court-approved settlement of the ’60s Scoop class action failed Friday when a judge tossed the novel attempt as lacking any substance.In his decision, Judge John Laskin of the Federal Court of Appeal said the applicants had provided no support for their highly unusual motion seeking leave to appeal the settlement.“The evidence filed by the applicants is inadequate in the extreme,” Laskin wrote.The ruling, barring any further court machinations, paves the way for implementation of the $750-million class-action settlement. The federal government had said it could not proceed with payouts to victims pending finality in the court proceedings.The request to appeal the agreement finalized over the summer rather than opt out — fewer than a dozen class members did so — came from a group of 11 claimants who said they were Scoop victims, although two of the plaintiffs subsequently dropped out of the proceeding.They filed their application through a law firm that had been shut out of the $75 million in legal fees agreed to as part of the class-action settlement.Among other things, they alleged they were excluded from the process that led to court approval of the agreement that would pay survivors as much as $50,000 a piece for the harms done when they, as children, were taken from their Indigenous families and placed with non-Indigenous ones. They also expressed unhappiness over the fees awarded to the lawyers who negotiated the deal.Laskin noted the applicants had failed to show they were survivors of the ’60s Scoop and therefore members of the class. Nor did they provide evidence that an appeal of the settlement would be in the best interests of survivors, he said.One of the applicants, Joan Frame, of Hamilton, had alleged to The Canadian Press that the lawyers who negotiated the settlement — some of whom worked on the case for free for the better part of a decade — “resorted to trickery” to get the agreement.“To allow people to win illegally and make money off our backs and suffering again should not be allowed to happen,” Frame had said.Laskin also took issue with such assertions, saying the applicants had offered no evidence in support.While it is normal in litigation for the losing party to be on the hook for the legal costs incurred by the winners, the winning lawyers are seeking costs personally from the lawyer who filed the appeal motion given the serious misconduct allegations he made against them.Laskin declined to award costs until Jai Singh Sheikhupura with Vancouver-based Watson Goepel has had an opportunity to make submissions. He has until Nov. 19 to do so.“We are pleased that the Federal Court of Appeal has cleared away the last impediment to the settlement being implemented,” said Kirk Baert, one of the lawyers involved in the class action. “Now the settlement funds can flow to the survivors as intended.”The $75 million in legal fees, which the federal government agreed to pay to four legal firms separately from the compensation to the Scoop survivors, became a flashpoint earlier this year when Ontario Superior Court of Justice Edward Belobaba said they were far too high.last_img read more

Are we going to play Alberta boy with rare illness no big

Are we going to play Alberta boy with rare illness no big

first_imgONOWAY, Alta. — Four-year-old Porter Stanley has some new pals at preschool.Russ stands beside him as they manoeuvre toy cars down and around a plastic parking garage. The newest kid in class, Mimi, offers her hand, patiently waiting for Porter to give her a high- five.They soon sit on a large carpet for circle time and belt out songs about a bumblebee, the weather and monkeys.Porter isn’t able to sing or speak, but claps his hands together with the help of an aide. His mouth turns up into a quick smile as a portable suction machine buzzes in the background.Porter is one of about 30 people ever in the world to have a reported diagnosis of Beare-Stevenson syndrome, a condition that caused the bone plates in his skull to fuse together before he was born.Doctors told his parents he would probably only live a few months. But after 10 surgeries and two years of medical ups and downs, Porter is doing well. He’s a big brother, an Edmonton Oilers hockey fan and loves watching “Paw Patrol.”And now he’s going to preschool.“It’s just opened up an entire world for him that he loves and he was missing out on,” his mother, Corine Stanley, explains after dropping Porter off with his new astronaut backpack at preschool in Onoway, a small town northwest of Edmonton.She says that when Porter started in the fall, she wondered how best to introduce him to his class.Porter’s head and face are misshapen. He uses a walker to get around. There’s a tracheotomy hole in his throat that helps him breathe, but leaves him only able to communicate by touching pictures on a computer tablet.His classmates watched a video about how Porter’s suction machine is used to clear his airway. And they listened to their teacher read a book about being different.In the end, Stanley says, Porter starting school was as normal as it could be.“He rolled in the first day and the kids were like, ‘OK, no big deal … Are we going to play or what’s going on here?’“They treat him like any other little boy. Because he is.”Instructor Vivian McDonald says Porter has the most medical challenges of any student. But his classmates have figured out that they have much in common.“It really shows that everyone can fit into the world and that we can respect our differences.”Porter’s pediatrician, Dr. Rehana Chatur, says she’s amazed by his progress.“If you were to ask any of us initially when Porter was born if he would be walking and in preschool, I don’t think any of us would have predicted that,” she says.At the Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton, where Porter has been featured in an ad campaign, Chatur regularly sees posters of his face and hears people talking about his appearance. She calls him a great ambassador.Chatur explains that the soft spot on top of a baby’s head allows room for the brain to grow and usually closes up by 14 months of age. In Porter’s case, parts of his skull had to be taken apart and pieced back together and shunts were also used to relieve pressure as his brain developed.Because of the way his skull was fused, parts of the brain that control balance and breathing still fit tightly at the base of his skull, causing his developmental delays.Porter was Chatur’s first Beare-Stevenson patient. And remarkably, considering the small number of cases in the world, she now has a second patient with the diagnosis. Chatur says she can’t reveal details other than the patient is a little girl.Most children with Beare-Stevenson live only a few months or until about age two, says Chatur. The oldest recorded patient with the syndrome was 13.The plan is for Porter to start kindergarten next year, says his mother. And because his hometown is small, he’ll continue on with the same group of friends.Socialization is important for his development and self-esteem, adds Chatur.And, in the end, Porter may be the one who is the teacher.“It’s important for kids to learn things like tolerance and patience and how to be inclusive,” Chatur says.“I think he’s teaching a lot of people, both kids and adults.”Chris Purdy, The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Court of Appeal upholds Edmonton mans extradition to US to face terrorism

Court of Appeal upholds Edmonton mans extradition to US to face terrorism

first_imgEDMONTON — The Alberta Court of Appeal has upheld an extradition order for a man facing terrorism charges in the United States.Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi, who is 34, has been charged in the U.S. with conspiring to provide and providing material support to terrorists engaged in violent activities in Syria.He was ordered extradited by Court of Queen’s Bench Justice John Little in May 2018.Three Appeal Court judges heard Abdullahi’s challenge of the extradition order last Wednesday.They say in a decision released Tuesday that there is enough evidence for him to go to trial on the charges.Officials in the U.S. allege Abdullahi conspired with Douglas McCain, the first known American who died fighting for the Islamic State, and others in the U.S. and Canada.Abdullahi, also known as Phish or Fish, was indicted in California in March 2017 and arrested by Canadian authorities in September 2017.The U.S. indictment alleges that Abdullahi conspired with McCain and others to provide personnel and money to people in Syria engaged in terrorist activities, including killing, kidnapping and maiming people.It also alleges Abdullahi robbed an Edmonton jewelry store to finance the travel of McCain and others, then wired the money.Abdullahi also faces an armed robbery charge in Canada.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

No decision on Huawei and 5G before fall federal election call Goodale

No decision on Huawei and 5G before fall federal election call Goodale

first_imgOTTAWA — Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale says Canadians will have to wait until after this fall’s federal election to find out whether Chinese tech giant Huawei can provide equipment for the country’s next-generation 5G wireless network.Goodale tells The Canadian Press that Canada needs more information from the United States about the nature of the potential security threat posed by the state-owned company.Goodale says that’s not likely to happen before campaigning begins for the Oct. 21 election, which is expected to get underway sometime in early September.Goodale was speaking after Canada and its Five Eyes intelligence allies wrapped a key meeting today that began with divisions over whether to let Huawei supply the equipment for the 5G system.The United States, along with Australia, has banned Huawei, citing concerns that it is an organ of Chinese military intelligence — a charge the company denies.Canada’s eventual decision is entwined with a broader political dispute with China that has seen the People’s Republic imprison two Canadian men following the RCMP’s decision to arrest Huawei senior executive Meng Wanzhou on an American extradition warrant.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Trudeau pledges to raise issue of falling media revenues at G7 leaders

Trudeau pledges to raise issue of falling media revenues at G7 leaders

first_imgTROIS-RIVIERES, Que. — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says he plans to take the issue of declining news revenues amid domination by tech giants to the G7 leaders’ summit in France later this week.The subject resurfaced when Groupe Capitales Medias, a cash-strapped French-language newspaper chain, filed for creditor protection Monday.The same day, the province announced a $5-million loan from Investissement Quebec to the media company, whose daily newspapers include Le Droit of Gatineau-Ottawa and Quebec City’s Le Soleil.But Trudeau says the situation requires more than a “one-off solution” and requires traction with the international community.Speaking with reporters in Trois-Rivieres, Que., the prime minister insisted that “everyone has to pay their share.”He says G7 leaders “will certainly be discussing” the issue of media ad revenues at the summit, which runs Friday through Sunday in the southwestern French city of Biarritz.French President Emmanuel Macron last month imposed a landmark tax on tech companies like Google and Facebook — which have lured advertising revenues away from news outlets — designed to stop multinationals from avoiding taxes by setting up European headquarters in low-tax European Union countries.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Hurricane watch in parts of Atlantic Canada as Dorian moves up US

Hurricane watch in parts of Atlantic Canada as Dorian moves up US

first_imgThe Canadian Press HALIFAX — Hurricane Dorian has moved off North Carolina as a Category 1 storm and is on a path that would take it into Atlantic Canada on Saturday.The Canadian Hurricane Centre says a hurricane watch is in effect for all of Nova Scotia and tropical storm watches are in effect for southeastern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, the Magdalen Islands and western Newfoundland.The most likely track projection brings Hurricane Dorian south of the Maritimes on Saturday, with the storm pushing through eastern Nova Scotia Saturday night, and then over the eastern Gulf of St. Lawrence or western Newfoundland by Sunday morning.The forecast is calling for severe winds and torrential rain, with a major impacts for southeastern New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, western Newfoundland and Quebec’s Lower North Shore.Large waves are expected for the Atlantic coasts of Nova Scotia, Newfoundland and for eastern portions of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while a storm surge, combined with large waves and pounding surf, may cause flooding in parts of Nova Scotia, P.E.I., Newfoundland, and the Magdalen Islands.Tropical storm force winds of 90 to 110 kilometres per hour are expected Saturday morning over southwestern Nova Scotia and in the afternoon over eastern parts of the province before moving on in the evening to P.E.I., the Magdalen Islands and southwestern Newfoundland.The highest rainfall amounts — 50 to 100 millimetres — are expected over Nova Scotia, P.E.I. and the Magdalen Islands.last_img read more

Sharon Stone Jon Favreau To Be Honored at Film Festival

Sharon Stone Jon Favreau To Be Honored at Film Festival

first_imgTickets are now on sale for the five-day Catalina Film Festival (CFF) starting on September 18 through 22.Now in its third year, the festival continues its celebration of foreign and domestic independent films, shorts, animation and documentaries. The festival benefits the Catalina Island Conservancy, a responsible steward of Catalina’s wildlands through a balance of conservation, education and recreation.CFF is a competitive festival and film market with awards in up to 10 categories, including the prestigious Charlie Chaplin ICON Award, Stanley Kramer “Social Artist” Award and the Isla Earth Award.“I am very proud of the Isla Earth conservation documentaries that provide young filmmakers an opportunity to bring pressing ecological issues into focus.” said Ann Muscat, president and CEO of the Conservancy, a non-profit dedicated to the protection and restoration of the Island’s wildlands. “We once again welcome the Catalina Film Festival. Several of the Island’s beautiful locations have been used in many memorable motion pictures.”Avalon Mayor Bob Kennedy said he always enjoys seeing the Catalina Film Festival come to town. “The film industry has a long history here,” he said. “It is good to see film enthusiasts come out here to enjoy all Avalon has to offer.”Sharon Stone and Jon Favreau will be in attendance.In addition to the more than 75 films that will be screened at the festival, several prestigious awards will be presented to members of the entertainment industry. Opening day of the festival will feature the presentation of the Stanly Kramer Social Artist Award to actor Sharon Stone. The following day, September 19, Jon Favreau will be honored with the Festival’s Charlie Chaplin ICON award in the beautiful Avalon Casino Theater. Other guests confirmed to attend include: Patricia Arquette, Michael Rapaport, Jaime Pressly, Ian Zierin, Lisa Bonet, Nikki Reed, Billy Zane and more.Tickets are available at CatalinaFilm.org. Same day party boat packages on Classic Catalina Cruises leave Friday and Saturday, September 20 and 21, from the Queen Mary Landing at 9 a.m. in Long Beach and departs from Avalon at midnight. Discount coupons for the Catalina Express Catalina Express leaving from Long Beach, San Pedro and Dana Point are also available.Stanley Kramer AwardSharon Stone we be receiving the award named for the late producer and director of such socially conscious films as “The Defiant Ones” (1958), “Inherit the Wind” (1960) and “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” (1967).“I am deeply honored to receive the Stanley Kramer Award,” Stone told the entertainment website bwhub.com. “Mr. Kramer spent his life as a filmmaker creating films that would demonstrate a greater humanity; one where race, religion, higher thinking and spiritual elegance would be at the forefront of his purpose,” she said. “He bore the responsibility of his positive actions with the grace and endurance of a goodly warrior. Time and truth reveals the impact of his thoughtful and meaningful choices.”Charlie Chaplin ICON AwardJon Favreau, who wrote and starred in “Rudy” (1993), “Swingers (1996) and directed “Iron Man (2008) and “Iron Man 2 (2010), will be honored with the Festival’s Charlie Chaplin ICON award on Thursday, Sept. 19, in the beautiful Avalon Casino Theater.“It’s a thrill to be honored for my diversity in film throughout the years. I look forward to continue creating and acting in films that I hope the audience will enjoy,” said Favreau.“Favreau has the well-rounded and accomplished career that the festival has envisioned with this award,” said festival founder Ron Truppa. “His body of work truly honors Chaplin’s qualities of realism, diversity and courage within his craft.”Young Filmmaker AwardOn Saturday morning the Make a Wish Foundation will present a Young Filmmaker Award posthumously, to the late child filmmaker, Rina Goldberg. The award will be presented to her mother from Bailee Madison, who portrayed Goldberg in the short film “The Magic Bracelet” (2013).MOVIE SCREENINGSTwo notable films that will make their Catalina and West Coast Premiers, respectively, include the comedy “Ass Backwards” and the “dramedy” “Best Man Down.”Thursday’s screening of “Ass Backwards” follows the exploits of Kate (June Diane Raphael) and Chloe (Casey Wilson) as they embark on a cross-country trip back to their hometown to attempt to win a pageant that eluded them as children. Also starring Bob Odenkirk, Alicia Silverstone, John Cryer and Paul Scheer. Chris Nelson directed and Raphael and Wilson wrote the film. The two actresses-writers are scheduled to attend the screening along with Scheer.Screening on Friday in its west coast premier is “Best Man Down,” written and directed by Ted Kolan. It’s about a newlywed couple who cancels their honeymoon and returns to the snowy Midwest to make the funeral arrangements for their best man, who died unexpectedly after their ceremony. Starring in the film are Justin Long, Jess Weixler and Tyler Labine. Long is scheduled to attend the screening.Just before the screening, the 2013 Catalina Crest Award will be presented to rising young actor Kodi Smit-McFee, who as in “The Road” (2009) and “Let Me In” (2010).Earlier on Friday will be the centennial screening of Stanley Kramer’s “Bless the Beasts and the Children,” filmed on Catalina in 1971. Billy Mumy (Lost in Space) stars, along with Catalina’s non-native bison.Also on Saturday a tribute will honor the late filmmaker Tony Scott with a screening of 1993’s “True Romance,” directed by Scott and written by Quentin Tarantino. The film stars Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette.Films will be screened at various locations in Avalon, including at the iconic Avalon Casino Theater.last_img read more

Lionel Richie To Perform At Rihannas Diamond Ball

Lionel Richie To Perform At Rihannas Diamond Ball

first_imgLionel Richie will perform at the second annual Diamond Ball, a black tie fundraising event benefitting Rihanna’s Clara Lionel Foundation (CLF) and presented by Samsung.Taking place on December 10th at the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, California, Kevin Hart will serve as host for the unforgettable evening.Founded in 2012 by Rihanna in honor of her grandparents, Clara and Lionel Brathwaite, CLF works to improve the quality of life for communities globally in the areas of health, education, arts, and culture.
”I’m so proud of the work the Clara Lionel Foundation has done in its first year and can’t wait to celebrate with the iconic Lionel Richie and incredibly talented Kevin Hart at this year’s Diamond Ball,” said Rihanna.
During the 2nd Annual Diamond Ball, Rihanna will present Michael Rapino, CEO of Live Nation, with the inaugural Diamond Honors Award. Under Mr. Rapino’s leadership, commitment to service has become a hallmark of Live Nation. The company and its subsidiaries including Ticketmaster have supported the philanthropic efforts of countless Live Nation artists including (RED), From One Hand to AnOTHER, The Pies Delscazos Foundation and The Shawn Carter Foundation as well as local charities throughout the 40 US markets where it has operations. Mr. Rapino has ensured that he serves his 20,000 employees when in need through the establishment of a Live Nation fund called Taking Care of Our Own which provides financial support and resources to employees facing personal adversity.In addition, Mr. Rapino and his wife Jolene are the founders of The Rapino Foundation, an international development and relief organization with a focus on the world’s most vulnerable populations such as women and children in the developing world. The Diamond Honors Award will be presented each year to a recipient who, like Mr. Rapino, has demonstrated true leadership in the fields of philanthropy and entertainment and whose work furthers CLF’s mission of improving the quality of life for communities globally in the areas of health, education, arts, and culture.“This foundation is close to my heart and I am so grateful for Michael Rapino’s support and commitment to our cause,” said Rihanna. “No one is more deserving of the first Diamond Honors Award than him.”Last year’s inaugural Diamond Ball was hosted by Jimmy Kimmel and featured an electrifying performance by Rihanna. In addition to special guest Brad Pitt, other celebrity attendees included Salma Hayek, Ellen Pompeo, Kim Kardashian, Kris Jenner, Big Sean, Ne-Yo, Fabulous and others who all came to show their support for the Clara Lionel Foundation. The event raised over $2 million – funds that were used to purchase two new state-of-the-art pieces of equipment for the Clara Braithwaite Center for Oncology and Nuclear Medicine at Queen Elizabeth Hospital (QEH) in Barbados. The most significant addition was a cutting edge brachytherapy system, the first of its kind in North America and one of only three in the world. With this addition, the center is now one of the most modern in the Caribbean with neighboring islands/hospitals referring patients to the Clara Braithwaite Center for Oncology and Nuclear Medicine.
In addition to the Clara Braithwaite Center for Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, other current programs include the Barbados Micro Grants for Schools Program as well as the Clara Lionel Foundation Global Scholarship Program which will be formerly launched during the Diamond Ball. This exciting new program will award full scholarships to youth globally giving them the opportunity to receive an education anywhere in the United States.
Paddle8, the auction house for 21st-century collectors, will serve as the auction partner for the event, with Paddle8 co-founder, Alexander Gilkes, leading the live auction. Highlights include a guitar signed by Bono and an original piece by Jeff Koons among many others. These items will be available online in the weeks leading up to the live auction via Paddle8.com/clf, beginning on November 25th.Samsung is the event’s presenting sponsor, with other sponsors including Live Nation and Puma. For table and ticket information, please contact Towalame Austin at info@claralionelfoundation.org or 310-975-6878.last_img read more

Diana Krall To Perform At Elton John AIDS Foundation 15th Annual New

Diana Krall To Perform At Elton John AIDS Foundation 15th Annual New

first_imgSir Elton John will welcome Grammy-winning performer Diana Krall as his special musical guest for the Elton John AIDS Foundation’s 15th annual fall gala, An Enduring Vision, on Wednesday, November 2, 2016, at Cipriani Wall Street in New York City.“I’m so thrilled Diana will be joining us for our fall gala this year,” said Elton John. “Diana is an extraordinary performer and a dear personal friend, and I’m thrilled beyond belief to welcome an artist of her caliber to our annual New York event.”Emmy award-winning producer and popular talk show host Andy Cohen will emcee the evening. EJAF will honor internationally-renowned philanthropists Frank Giustra and Steve Tisch with the Foundation’s Enduring Vision Award and present its second Founder’s Award to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.Diana Krall took the jazz world by storm in the late ‘90s. By the turn of the century she was firmly established as one of the biggest sellers in jazz. Her 1996 album, All for You, was a Nat King Cole tribute that showed the singer/pianist’s roots, and since then she has stayed fairly close to that tradition-minded mode, with wildly successful results. When I Look in Your Eyes followed in 1999. Whatever renown she had earned over the years for her work exploded with this album, which became an international best-seller and earned her a Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Performance. It was also the first jazz album to be nominated for Album of the Year in 25 years.In 2001 she released The Look of Love, which topped the Billboard charts and went quintuple platinum in Canada, the first by a Canadian jazz artist to do so. The album also helped Diana win three Junos in 2002, taking home awards for Artist of the Year, Album of the Year, and Best Vocal Jazz Album of the Year. Then her Live from Paris (2002) album won a Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Album.In 2003, Diana married iconic British rock musician Elvis Costello. A year later, she issued The Girl in the Other Room, which covered a few standards and also included original material – some co-written by Costello – for the first time in her career. More albums following, including From This Moment On (2006), Quiet Nights (2009), which debuted at number three on the Billboard Top 200, and Glad Rag Doll (2012), a collection of early jazz and ragtime tunes from the ‘20s and ’30s produced by T-Bone Burnett. In her most recent album Wallflower (2015), Diana covered a selection of pop songs from the ’60s onward by Bob Dylan, Elton John, Gilbert O’Sullivan, and the Eagles, all of whom had inspired her in her childhood.or ticket information, please contact Andreas Schwarz at the Elton John AIDS Foundation, 212.219.0670 or andreas.schwarz@ejaf.org.last_img read more

Katee Sackhoff Wants You To Be A Hero For Dogs

Katee Sackhoff Wants You To Be A Hero For Dogs

first_imgClutching her pup, Vargas, a star-spangled Katee Sackhoff flies to the rescue in a new comic book–style PETA ad that proclaims, “When the Heat Gets Too Much, Be a Hero and Rescue Dogs From Hot Cars.”Katee Sackhoff on Dogs in Hot CarsIn an exclusive video interview with PETA, the Battlestar Galactica and Longmire star shares why dogs should never be left in hot cars. “In under 15 minutes, an animal can succumb to brain damage, and within 15 minutes, they can die,” she says. “And it doesn’t matter if you’re parked in the shade, if you have the windows cracked, if you leave them water. It doesn’t matter. You’ve left your animal in an oven.”That’s why Sackhoff urges anyone who spots an animal in danger to write down the license plate number, try to find the animal’s guardian, call the authorities, and, if necessary, remove the animal from the vehicle. “I would break into a car — I’ve seen people do it before,” she says. “It’s no different than the fire department going into your home when your dog is stuck inside if there’s a fire in your house.”This year alone, PETA has already received reports of 41 dogs who have died after being left alone in cars, even on relatively mild days: On a 78-degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can soar to 100 degrees in just minutes. On a 90-degree day, interior temperatures can reach as high as 109 degrees in less than 10 minutes.last_img read more

Rock Icon Chrissie Hynde Responds To McDonalds Chicken Welfare Announcement

Rock Icon Chrissie Hynde Responds To McDonalds Chicken Welfare Announcement

first_imgPETA spokesperson Chrissie Hynde of The Pretenders has made a statement regarding McDonald’s announcement of new welfare standards for chickens.“McDonald’s pledge will help reduce some horrific suffering, but millions of birds will still be scalded alive for McNuggets until the policy takes effect in 2024, and the company still raises chickens with crippled legs and deformities,” said Hynde. “Other chains have enacted much stronger protections already and have broadened their base by offering vegan options.”Chrissie Hynde has led PETA’s “McCruelty” campaign since 1999, protesting against the chain for scalding chickens alive in defeathering tanks, a practice that the company promised this week to change.last_img

Calgary author Stephen Shawcross revisits Woodstock with new comingofage novel

Calgary author Stephen Shawcross revisits Woodstock with new comingofage novel

first_img Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisement The Calgary author and urban planner blames the rather uninspiring job he had during the summer of 1969 for missing the event. It was at an asphalt factory in Brampton, Ont. Then 18, he was trying to save up for his second year of university, so couldn’t afford to miss his 12-hour shift. But Shawcross clearly remembers one of his roommates trying to convince him to go. He had no idea, of course, that the Woodstock Music & Art Fair would become one of the most iconic, generation-defining event in cultural history.“He went and came back with these incredible stories,” says Shawcross. “I’ve probably been kicking myself ever since.”It’s not as if Shawcross sees this near-miss as a major regret in his life. But it may have played a small role in him setting his newest novel, Walking on the Moon, with Woodstock as a rich backdrop The quest-like narrative finds Ralph and Billy, two of the goofier characters from Shawcross’s 2007 debut novel Runaway Summer, hitchhiking to the concert in 1969, inspired to embark on this sky-is-the-limit journey by Neil Armstrong’s then recent moon walk.center_img Advertisement Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

RIP MuchFACT

RIP MuchFACT

first_imgAdvertisement Ottawa: The CRTC has effectively killed MuchFACT, the MuchMusic funded Foundation to Assist Talent on video.The announcement was made within a bundle of regulatory decisions announced Monday (Decision 149, section 55).The MuchFACT program routinely pumps as much as $2 million a year into Canadian music content creation. Advertisement As part of Bell Media’s TV renewal approval, the CRTC approved the deletion of required contributions to MuchFACT by Much and sister station Gusto (formerly M3).As well, Bell Media-owned MTV Canada is no longer required to allocate $50,000 annually to independent production companies for concept and script development.READ MORE Login/Register With: Advertisement Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebooklast_img read more

Toronto house was where Black Christmas was filmed — and the slasher

Toronto house was where Black Christmas was filmed — and the slasher

first_imgGriffin’s new family included Olivia Hussey, Margot Kidder, Andrea Martin and more, as well as the film director Bob Clark. Before the successes of A Christmas Story and Porky’s, Clark had recently moved to Toronto from the United States and was making his first Canadian feature film. Advertisement Advertisement Twitter This house on Clarendon Cres. in Toronto was used in the 1974 cult horror film Black Christmas. (CARLOS OSORIO / TORONTO STAR) LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Login/Register With: Facebook Unnoticed by passersby and often unmarked by plaques, numerous Toronto addresses with big parts to play in cultural history sit mostly uncelebrated. In our series Local Legends, we tell you about them and put them on your mental map.In the early 1970s, actress Lynne Griffin was in her early 20s and establishing herself as an ingénue type on Toronto and Stratford stages, in the early days of Canadian theatre. After coming off of the world premiere of David French’s family drama Leaving Home at Tarragon Theatre, Griffin’s next project introduced her to a new group of sisters in a stately home not far from the Tarragon, in the neighbourhood of St. Clair Ave. W. and Avenue Rd.“I remember it as a very, very friendly place. That was one of the fun things about working on a project over a number of weeks, you really get to feel like those people were part of your family. Especially when you’re going to a house every day, it really starts to feel like your family home,” Griffin told the Star. Advertisementlast_img read more

MEDIA GROUPS SPEAK OUT ON CHARGES AGAINST ONTARIO JOURNALISTS ARRESTED ON THE

MEDIA GROUPS SPEAK OUT ON CHARGES AGAINST ONTARIO JOURNALISTS ARRESTED ON THE

first_imgAdvertisement Two media advocacy groups say charges against a pair of Ontario journalists arrested on the job are an assault on freedom of the press.The groups say Aylmer Express publisher John Hueston and his son, editor Brett Hueston, were arrested last year while trying to report on a vehicle crash on a road near Lake Erie.The vehicle had driven over a cliff, and the province’s Special Investigations Unit was called in to determine if the crash had been caused by a chase from Ontario Provincial Police. Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement Facebook Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The advocacy organizations say the Huestons drove past a road closure sign in order to get closer to the scene, but did not interfere with the ongoing police investigation and had minimal interactions with officers that consisted only of asking where to park and take pictures.The groups say the journalists were arrested and charged with criminal obstruction of a peace officer, charges the pair plan to fight on Thursday in a St. Thomas, Ont. courtroom.The OPP says it cannot comment on a matter that is before the courts, but the advocacy organizations say the charges violate freedom of the press and set a dangerous precedent.“The OPP’s decision to charge a father and son team who run a community newspaper is a stunning and unacceptable assault on press freedom and the public’s right to know,” said Karyn Pugliese, president of the Canadian Association of Journalists. “We urge the OPP to immediately withdraw all charges against the journalists.”A similar call came from the Ottawa-based Canadian Committee for World Press Freedom, who “condemned” the charges against the father and son as an “unacceptable assault” on journalists’ right to work effectively.The OPP was cleared of any involvement in the crash, which was ultimately ruled a suicide.Const. Adam Crewdson said the force could not comment on the particulars of the Huestons’ case, but said provincial police valued the media’s role.“The OPP strives for a good working relationship with our media partners,” he said in a statement. “The media-police relationship is very important to the OPP as they help us inform the public on policing matters, public safety concerns, traffic initiatives and much more.”The Huestons’ trial is expected to last only one day.BY MICHELLE MCQUIGGE | THE CANADIAN PRESSlast_img read more

JAYNE EASTWOOD TO RECEIVE ACTRA TORONTOS 2019 AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

JAYNE EASTWOOD TO RECEIVE ACTRA TORONTOS 2019 AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

first_imgTORONTO, Dec. 10, 2018 – On February 23, 2019, ACTRA Toronto will present its 2019 Award of Excellence to Jayne Eastwood, a Canadian character actor with 50 years’ experience acting in film, TV, stage and voicing animation.Eastwood’s film career started memorably in 1970 with Don Shebib’s Canadian film classic Goin’ Down the Road. She reprised the role of Betty in Down the Road Again in 2011. She has hundreds of screen titles to her credit in films such as Chicago, My Big Fat Greek Wedding and Hairspray. Her TV work is extensive with recurring roles in SCTV, two of George Walker’s series: This is Wonderland and Living in Your Car, King of Kensington, Bizarre, Billable Hours, Train 48, Little Mosque on the Prairie, Riverdale, Annedroids, Material World, Haven and in Sinking Ship’s Dino Dan and Dino Dana. In 1998 she won a Gemini award for her work in Dangerous Offender: The Marlene Moore Story. Jayne is also a busy voice actor, her distinctive voice easily recognizable in titles such as The Care Bears Movie, Scaredy Squirrel, For Better or Worse, Bob and Margaret, Jo Jo’s Circus, among others too numerous to mention. She won a Gemini award for voicing Aunt Agatha in Noddy and Friends in 1999. She won an ACTRA Award for Best Actress in 1976, the Earle Grey Award for lifetime achievement in 1999 and the Dave Broadfoot Canadian Comedy Award in 2011. She has teamed up with Kathryn Greenwood, Robin Duke and Teresa Pavlinek in Women Fully Clothed which received a 2005 nomination for a Canadian Comedy Award for best sketch troupe. She is an inspiration to her fellow Canadian performers for having crafted a successful and well-rounded career while remaining in Canada. She continues to call Ontario home saying in an interview in ACTRA Toronto’s Performers magazine (Fall 2011), “I love this damn country.”“This is such a beautiful award because it comes from my union, my fellow actors, who I can honestly say I love,” says Jayne Eastwood. “I want to thank ACTRA for having worked so hard over many years to create a film and television industry that is a great place for us Canadian actors to work.” Advertisement Jayne Eastwood (CNW Group/ACTRA Toronto) Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment ACTRA Toronto President Theresa Tova says, “Throughout her stellar career Jayne has moved effortlessly from comedy to drama, but comedy remains her magnetic north. We are grateful to Jayne for lending us her star power to lobby politicians at Queen’s Park and Parliament Hill for more Canadian content on our screens, a cause dear to Jayne’s heart. Jayne is not only an actor’s actor but also a crowd favourite who’s routinely recognized by members of the public and politicians alike. We are so proud to honour Jayne Eastwood this year.”The ACTRA Awards in Toronto celebrates outstanding performances by its members on screen. Four juried awards for outstanding male, female, male voice and female voice will be presented this year in addition to the Award of Excellence, the ACTRA Toronto Stunt Award and the members’ choice Series Ensemble Award.ACTRA Toronto is the largest organization within ACTRA, representing more than 15,000 of Canada’s 23,000 professional performers working in recorded media. As an advocate for Canadian culture since 1943, ACTRA is a member-driven union that continues to secure rights and respect for the work of professional performers.center_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more

ED SHEERAN AND JUSTIN BIEBER FLY TO NO 1 IN AUSTRALIA WITH

ED SHEERAN AND JUSTIN BIEBER FLY TO NO 1 IN AUSTRALIA WITH

first_imgAdvertisement Twitter Ed Sheeran and Justin Bieber breeze to the top of Australia’s singles chart with “I Don’t Care” (Universal/Warner) while Pink’s Hurts 2B Human (RCA/Sony) rules the national albums chart for a third successive week.Sheeran and Bieber’s pop power-collaboration went in at No. 1 on the U.K. chart last Friday and it repeats the feat Down Under, where it debuts at the summit of the ARIA Singles Chart.The track becomes Sheeran’s fifth No. 1 single in Australia, following “Sing” (May 2014), “Thinking Out Loud” (October 2014), “Shape Of You” (January 2017) and “Perfect” (December 2017), and it’s Bieber’s third, after “What Do You Mean?” (September 2015) and “Love Yourself” (December 2015). Justin Bieber and Ed Sheeran attend the World Premiere of “Ed Sheeran: Jumpers For Goalposts” at Odeon Leicester Square on Oct. 22, 2015 in London. (David M. Benett/Dave Benett/WireImage) Advertisement Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more

Former AFN regional chief wins NDP nomination in Alberta riding

Former AFN regional chief wins NDP nomination in Alberta riding

first_img(Former AFN Regional Chief Cameron Alexis is now an NDP candidate in Alberta. Photo courtesy: Alberta Native News)Brandi Morin APTN National NewsFormer Alberta Assembly of First Nations Regional Chief Cameron Alexis has won the NDP nomination battle for the riding of Peace River –Westlock in Alberta.Alexis is also the former chief of Alexis Nakota Sioux First Nation.Alexis did not seek re-election for AFN regional chief last May because he was helping to care for his wife who was ill.He told APTN that since then, his wife’s health has significantly improved and he is ready to spend long stretches of time away from home.Alexis said he was approached by more than one party to consider running, but chose the NDP because of its track record on Aboriginal issues including its stance against Bill C-51 and improving on childcare services.“I’ve come to respect the NDP not only from a First Nations perspective but also on Canadian issues,” said Alexis.Alexis was also impressed by the late Jack Layton’s support of Indigenous people and took notice of Thomas Mulcair’s presence at the recent TRC events in Ottawa.He said it’s time Canada’s Indigenous people get engaged in politics.“We have to participate in order to affect change. With Prime Minister Harper and all of the bills and legislation they are presenting, it’s affecting our Treaty and Indigenous rights. We have to start standing up and running for office.”Alexis is hopeful that if the NDP is successful in winning enough seats to lead the country that they will take serious the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP).“I think Tom Mulcair has a wealth of political experience and he can deliver leadership to this country. And with the provincial NDP Premier Rachel Notley, she has stuck by her word and is implementing UNDRIP. That is something Prime Minister Harper called aspirational, but I’m hoping the federal NDP will implement it as well.”Alexis is married with two sons, a daughter and 12 grandchildren. He served two years as AFN regional chief, six years as chief of his home community and before that served a 23 year career as an RCMP officer.Ultimately, he encourages Indigenous people to get to the polls and make their voices heard this fall.“I’m asking First Nations and Indigenous people to step up, stand up and be counted. We have to make a difference otherwise we’ll be continued to be dictated to and unable to participate in how this country operates.”So far, Alexis is facing Conservative Arnold Vierson. The Liberals and the Greens have yet to field a candidate.bmorin@aptn.calast_img read more