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New SMC voter initiative encourages students to participate in 2020 election

New SMC voter initiative encourages students to participate in 2020 election

first_imgTo celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the 19th Amendment — giving women the right to vote — Saint Mary’s faculty and staff are creating the “100@100” campaign to encourage eligible students to vote in this year’s general election.Thomas Bonnell, professor and a 100@100 organizer, explained his thought process behind proposing the idea to the College.“In this hundred anniversary year, I thought it would be a worthwhile goal for a women’s college like Saint Mary’s to set a really high aim of at least going for 100% participation in the voting process for those who are eligible to vote,” he said. “We have some international students and there are some students who aren’t old enough. So, there are some who cannot vote, but [we are] trying to get everybody who is eligible to vote involved in the process.”Courtesy of the 100@100 Campaign Rebekah Go, director of the Office for Civic and Social Engagement (OCSE) and a 100@100 organizer, reflected on the importance of voting after historically oppressed groups struggled to receive suffrage.“[I]n the case of some people such as women and people of color, having the opportunity to participate in the process came at a cost,” Go said. “We honor those who fought for the right for us to vote by thoughtfully participating in the process at every opportunity.”Bonnell hopes to energize the student population to participate in the voting process, especially because of nationwide political apathy.“[It] will take a bit of ingenuity on our part to come up with ways of making it fun and exciting for students to actually sign onto because, frankly, in our society, there’s significant amount of apathy, a significant amount of cynicism,” Bonnell said. “And we have to, to the best of our ability, try to overcome those disincentives for participating in the process.”Go stated that 100@100 has many events planned for students to engage in before Election Day.“Over 30 campus-wide events are planned for fall 2020,” Go said. “This includes tabling for voter registration and absentee ballot assistance, voter education events such as lectures and talks, and civil discourse initiatives to increase political discourse on campus in a way that promotes healthy dialogue across ideological differences.”Bonnell overviewed the plans for the words of the 19th Amendment to displayed around campus to encourage students to register to vote.“The text of the 19th amendment will be put up phrase by phrase … and then we’ll move those banners around campus from place to place and have them there as a reminder for students to register and ultimately to vote,” he said.In addition, Bonnell noted that there will be other references to important events in voter history on display.“Alongside that text will be some other banners contextualizing the sort of the ongoing efforts,” he said. “So, one might perhaps read the Voting Rights Act of 1965 …[O]ther milestones are reminders that we’re actually still working to secure voting rights for all US citizens.”The campaign will also be hosting a voter registration drive on voter registration day. However, Bonnell reminds students that they can register any time before their state’s designated deadline.“Next Tuesday is Voter Registration Day, so there will be tables up for that,” he said. “But, you know, that’s one day and, as I say, we just need to keep people signing up to vote, whether it’s here in Indiana or at home through absentee ballots. Because, you know, I won’t say time is running out, but time is short.” Go emphasized that everyone is impacted by the choices of lawmakers, so voting is a critical part of having a say in what elected officials decide.“Any individual who has complained about a pothole or is frustrated by snow removal in January has a stake in the election because allocation of resources are decided by elected bodies,” she said. “This is true in a city or town as much as it is true on the federal level. Participating in the electoral process via voting is one of the most consequential ways an individual can influence those decisions.” Go also stated that voters should learn about important issues on all levels of government.“Once individuals familiarize themselves with the mechanics of voting, it’s important that they educate themselves on the issues — on a local, state, and national level,” Go said. “Some people can become myopic — only focusing on the federal election — but there are many important races being run at all levels. Knowing how to vote is the first step, but deciding who to vote for is where the rubber meets the road.”Bonnell acknowledged the importance of young people voting, as they make up the largest demographic in this year’s election.“If 18 to 24-year-olds show up to vote, you will elect the president, the senators, members of Congress, members of the State House, governors,” Bonnell said. “You can outvote any and all other demographics at this point, including Baby Boomers.”Because of this, Bonnell stresses that college students get out to vote so they can influence politics for their generation.“Get as many people of your age to vote as possible,” he said. “Because you guys need to shape the world that you’re going to grow up in.”Tags: 100@100, 2020 election season, Office for Civic and Social Engagement, Voter turnoutlast_img read more

Mad River Snow Welcomes Wood & Wood Design as Partner

Mad River Snow Welcomes Wood & Wood Design as Partner

first_imgMad River Snow, Inc, welcomed Wood &Wood Design, a Waitsfield, Vermont specialty design firm, as a new partnerin its resort services business. Mad River Snow is a consortium created tooffer a single source for resort construction, interior design, wayfindingsystems, and signage to mountain resorts throughout North America. Theannouncement was made jointly today by Jeff Robinson, President of MadRiver Snow, and Sparky Potter, Owner of Wood & Wood Design.Wood & Wood specializes in designing resort interiors to maximize thefunction and profitability of profit centers, promote the use of resortamenities, enhance customer satisfaction, and increase the potential forrepeat business. The company also creates unique decorative art,furnishings, award winning way-finding systems and signage. Wood & Woodcreates a sense of place that is unique, ensures that resort guests getwhere they need to go, and gives them the information they need to enjoyeach resort experience.Wood & Wood joins current consortium members, Mad River Snow ofWaitsfield, Vermont and Maurer Construction of Penticton, BritishColumbia. Mad River Snow is a licensed general contractor and constructionmanagement firm with over 30 years experience in commercial andresidential construction. Maurer Construction offers more than 25 yearsexperience in log, post and beam, and timber frame construction. Together,the consortium designs and builds resort structures (base lodges,ancillary buildings, condominiums and single-family homes), interiors, andwayfinding systems with the aesthetic and functional requirements that areunique to resorts.last_img read more

New solar orchard connects Monitor Barns’ past with present

New solar orchard connects Monitor Barns’ past with present

first_imgAllEarth Renewables, Inc.,The Richmond-based Vermont Youth Conservation Corps (VYCC) is now harvesting the sun for energy. Through a new solar orchard, the nationally-renowned VYCC will derive the power for its conservation, education, and agricultural programs from the sun, connecting their two iconic monitor barns in a contemporary way.  The VYCC will formally commission the solar orchard at its annual meeting and celebration — Denim & Diamonds ‘ tomorrow, Saturday, September 24th. The statewide training and education organization headquartered in the West Monitor Barn, VYCC has developed an agricultural program over the past four years.  This installation is one more piece in the on-going commitment to revitalize the agriculture and economic contributions of this historic property. In the coming years, the Corps expects to bring the east farmstead back to life, developing the barns for leadership programs that will compliment the VYCC’s broad array of programs. President Thomas Hark says, ‘The Monitor Barns and the surrounding land were the epitome of Vermont’s working landscape over the first half of the twentieth century and are coming back to life as regional economic engines. After years of decline, this working landscape will thrive again by embracing a 21st Century economy.’ ‘It is our expectation that the public will be able to get up close and learn how solar works so that Vermont as a whole can have an even more intelligent conversation about our energy future,’ added Hark. Manufactured just seven miles from the new solar orchard, AllSun Trackers produced by Williston-based AllEarth Renewables will produce 84,000 kWh annually. The 14 pole-mounted solar trackers use innovative GPS and wireless technology to actively follow the sun throughout the day, producing more than 40 percent more energy than fixed solar panels.  ‘This solar orchard uses renewable  innovation to sustain some of the best of Vermont’s past,’ said David Blittersdorf, CEO and founder of AllEarth Renewables.  In June, AllEarth Renewables’ CEO was named by Business Week as one of 25 of ‘America’s Most Promising Social Entrepreneurs.’    The AllSun Tracker orchard will supply all of  VYCC’s electric needs with excess going to local schools.Chittenden East Superintendent John Alberghini says, ‘We couldn’t be more thrilled. Not only will this project cut costs, it will be a valuable part of our curriculum.” One hundred years ago the Monitor Barns in Richmond were a significant part of the regional economy. However, starting in the late 1930’s the farm and the barns began to deteriorate.  In 2005, the VYCC successfully restored the West Barn which now serves as the VYCC’s statewide headquarters. In 2008, VYCC purchased the East Monitor Barn and accompanying 165 acres.About AllEarth Renewables, Inc.  AllEarth Renewables is a Vermont company that specializes in the design, manufacture and installation of complete grid-connected solar renewable energy systems that lessen dependence on nuclear and fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The company’s goal is to provide turnkey products that harness the power of the sun for homes and businesses while creating sustainable, well-paying jobs.  www.AllEarthRenewables.com(link is external) RICHMOND, Vermont . . . September 23, 2011 . . .last_img read more

Data breach, FY2016 U.S. budget plan on Hill radar this week

Data breach, FY2016 U.S. budget plan on Hill radar this week

first_imgThe Credit Union National Association is following several hearings on both sides of the U.S. Capitol this week, including sessions on data breach legislation and on the administration’s fiscal year 2016 budget.Hearings of credit union interest include:Today, the House Ways and Means Committee is scheduled to conduct a hearing on “The President’s FY2016 Budget Proposal,” and the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has slated a hearing on “Inspectors General: Independence, Access and Authority;” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr On Thursday, the Senate Finance Committee will hold a hearing on “The President’s Budget for FY2016;” the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation subcommittee on consumer protection, product safety, and insurance subcommittee will examine data breach issues in its hearing titled “Getting it Right on Data Breach and Notification Legislation in the 114th Congress ( News Now Feb. 2).” continue reading »center_img On Wednesday, the House Financial Services subcommittee on oversight and investigations will hold a hearing titled “Exploring Alleged Ethical and Legal Violations at the Department of Housing and Urban Development;” andlast_img read more

Hays Travel founder, John Hays, dies aged 71 | News

Hays Travel founder, John Hays, dies aged 71 | News

first_imgHays Travel specialises in providing good value, quality holidays alongside excellent customer service.Commenting on the passing of John Hays, Andy Cohen, head of ATOL, said: “I’ve had the pleasure of knowing John for over 30 years. “He was a man of integrity and a very successful businessman who loved the travel industry. “I spent many hours over the years talking sport, travel and many other subjects with John, who would often offer me advice. “He was always a pleasure to be around, and I know he will be missed by many.” Before it took on hundreds of Thomas Cook shops last year, Hays Travel had 190 shops, 1,900 staff, and sales of £379 million, reporting profits of £10 million.Mark Tanzer, chief executive of travel trade organisation ABTA, said: “We were shocked and saddened to hear this afternoon’s news that John Hays has passed away. “John was a major figure in the travel industry over many years, and created one of the industry’s most successful companies.” John, who with his wife and co-owner Irene Hays bought the Thomas Cook retail estate a year ago, was at Sunderland head office of the company when he collapsed.The couple built Hays Travel into the largest independent travel agent in the UK, providing jobs and careers for thousands of young people over 40 years.Throughout the past year they did everything possible power to save jobs and protect the travel industry for the impact of Covid-19. – Advertisement – OlderLeone takes up leadership of Jumeirah at Saadiyat Island Resort A statement from the company said: “He was held in immense respect by his staff, colleagues, family and friends and was recognised throughout his life for his many achievements.“He was equally proud of his loyal staff who, under the direction of the board and senior management team, will ensure that the business continues to serve the customers of the largest independent travel agent as he would have wanted.”Hays Travel took over parts of Thomas Cook last year- Advertisement –center_img The travel industry is mourning the passing of John Hays, the founder and managing director of Hays Travel, who died today at the age of 71.A statement from the company said he died at work, doing “the job he loved”.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

HHS awards contract for H5N1 avian flu vaccine

HHS awards contract for H5N1 avian flu vaccine

first_imgSep 21, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – In a bid to limit the threat of an influenza pandemic, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is awarding a contract to Aventis Pasteur Inc. to make 2 million doses of a vaccine for humans to protect against H5N1 avian influenza.”The vaccine that is being made is designed to match the H5N1 influenza virus that has killed 29 people in Thailand and Vietnam this year,” HHS officials said in a news release. “If a pandemic of avian influenza virus H5N1 occurred in humans, the new vaccine would be used to protect laboratory workers, public health personnel, and, if needed, the general public.”The H5N1 virus caused widespread poultry outbreaks in East Asia this year. Disease experts fear that if the virus infected humans or pigs already carrying a human flu virus, the viruses might combine to form a new strain that could spread easily from person to person. All of the 40 human cases of H5N1 infection this year are believed to have resulted from exposure to birds, not from person-to-person transmission.”This is an important step toward preparing our nation to respond to a pandemic influenza outbreak,” HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson stated in the news release. “The reemergence of the avian flu in Asia this year is another sign that we have to develop and produce vaccines against the threat of a pandemic flu. The United States is the first nation to undertake this preventive measure on this scale.”HHS and Aventis listed the amount of the vaccine contract as “nearly $13 million.”The virus used to develop the vaccine was isolated from a human case-patient in Asia this year, according to Bruce Gellin, MD, MPH, director of the National Vaccine Program in Thompson’s office. The vaccine involves a weakened form of the virus that triggers an immune response but does not cause disease, he told CIDRAP News.Gellin said the contract is being awarded now so that Aventis Pasteur can make the vaccine during the lull between production periods for the regular annual flu vaccine. “We’re taking advantage of the off-season of production of flu vaccine,” he said. The season for preparing and producing regular flu vaccine, which has to be made each year to match circulating strains, runs from January to September, he noted.”Basically they’re making this the same way they would make any component of the annual vaccine,” Gellin said.Gellin said the dose size for the H5N1 vaccine has not yet been determined. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is developing pilot lots of the vaccine for use in clinical trials that will start later this year or early next year, he explained. “The results [of the trials] will tell us how to formulate the bulk vaccine that’s being manufactured now,” he said.Since the H5N1 virus might have to change before it could trigger a pandemic, Gellin acknowledged that there’s no guarantee that the new vaccine would be effective against a pandemic strain. “There may be a need to have further refinement and have a different vaccine down the line,” he said. But he added that because the vaccine is based on a virus isolated from a recent human case-patient, it should offer the best possible defense at this point.Infectious disease expert Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, commented, “We don’t know if this vaccine will offer any protection, should there be additional changes in the virus. But I think this is a very prudent and appropriate step to take at this time, and it reflects the importance we all place on the possibility of a pandemic strain.” Osterholm, a longtime consultant to HHS, is director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of this Web site.Aventis Pasteur will produce and store the new vaccine at its facility in Swiftwater, Pa., according to a company news release. “The H5N1 vaccine will be manufactured from a seed virus provided by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),” part of the NIH, the statement said. “The seed virus is a weakened version of the wild type virus and was extensively tested prior to delivery to Aventis Pasteur.”The company said it signed an agreement with NIAID earlier this year to produce 8,000 doses of the H5N1 virus strain for use in the clinical trials.The HHS announcement noted that a pandemic flu virus results from a major, sudden shift in the virus’ structure that increases its ability to cause illness in a large share of the population. Most of the time, flu viruses evolve gradually, making it possible to keep up with them through minor modifications of vaccines.Today’s announcement comes less than a month after HHS released a draft plan for coping with a flu pandemic. The document, released Aug 26, warned that if a pandemic began today, the nation would not be ready with an effective vaccine or adequate supplies of antiviral drugs.The HHS announcement also comes little more than a month after the NIH awarded Chiron Corp., Emeryville, Calif., a contract to make an investigational vaccine based on an H9N2 strain of avian flu. That virus infected three people in Hong Kong in 1999 and 2003 and also has the potential to evolve into a form that could spark a pandemic, according to the NIH.Chiron will produce up to 40,000 doses of the H9N2 vaccine for clinical trials that the NIH plans to launch early in 2005.See also:Sep 21 HHS announcementhttp://archive.hhs.gov/news/press/2004pres/20040921a.htmlAug 17 NIH news release on contract for H9N2 avian flu vaccinehttp://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/2004/Pages/h9n2.aspxHHS pandemic influenza response and preparedness plan (released Aug 26)http://www.hhs.gov/pandemicflu/plan/last_img read more

WHO to report on ethical issues in pandemic planning

WHO to report on ethical issues in pandemic planning

first_imgOct 27, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The World Health Organization (WHO) plans to issue a report in January on ethical issues raised by pandemic influenza planning, such as how to provide fair access to available drugs and vaccines, WHO officials said today after 2 days of meetings in Geneva.More than 30 leading experts on pandemic flu, ethics, and public health attended the meetings Oct 24 and 25, WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl said at a news teleconference today.”This was not designed to reach any conclusions, but to raise issues,” Hartl said. “The idea was to get people talking about these issues before the pandemic started.”Dr. Alex Capron, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Southern California, said the discussions focused on four main topics: equitable access to therapeutic and prophylactic measures; ethical aspects of interventions such as quarantine and social distancing; what healthcare workers should be expected to do during an outbreak and what obligations are owed them; and issues that arise between governments when developing a multilateral response to a pandemic.The WHO report will stress the need to have broad public involvement in decisions and to base choices on an accurate understanding of the pandemic, officials said.”The recognition that emerged very strongly [at the meetings] was that it was going to be essential to have public engagement in all aspects of planning and a frank and candid recognition that the questions of the pandemic are going to be not just technical questions, but also ethical questions,” Capron said.He said the WHO is not aiming for “a single set of prescriptions for all circumstances.” Instead, everyone involved in planning will be dealing with “the need for trading off among a number of different ethical values.”He cited several examples: the principle of utility, which stresses the need to “maximize welfare”; the principle of fairness, which emphasizes justice; the principle of liberty, which says individuals should be able to make their own choices as much as possible; and the principle of reciprocity, which says that people who contribute to the public good are owed something in return.”These may point in different directions,” Capron said.In response to a question about vaccine rationing, Capron said, “One of the things that emerged very strongly is the necessity for good ethics to rest on good facts.” Some at the meeting challenged the assumption that children and elderly people will be at greatest risk, and suggested, he said, that health agencies may need “contingency plans depending on what the virus turns out to be like, how it behaves.”In an apparent reference to suggestions that the pandemic may hit young, healthy adults hardest, as occurred in the 1918 pandemic, Capron added, “The assumption that the youngest or oldest are most at risk is the assumption that applies to seasonal influenza, [which] may or may not be the case here.”Dr. Elaine Gadd, a senior medical officer and ethics specialist with the United Kingdom Department of Health, seconded Capron’s comments. “It’s very important that any plans are responsive to the actual characteristics of the pandemic, which we do not know in advance. Any plan must be capable of amendment in light of the actual facts.”In response to another question about vaccine allocation, Dr. Richard Heymann, the WHO director-general’s acting special representative for pandemic flu, said the groups that will most need protection include health workers and their families along with police and fire fighters.As for journalists, Heymann said he hopes they can be protected too. “But it has to be decided by the local community and the countries,” he added. “WHO just meets and makes broad recommendations and studies the issues.” (Experts say no vaccine well-matched to the pandemic virus will be available for at least the first several months of a pandemic, and after that it will be in short supply.)A report on the ethics meeting will be drafted and circulated to participants and other stakeholders in November, with a goal of publishing the report and some “guiding points” in January, said Dr. Andreas Reis, a WHO technical officer for ethics and health.See also: May 25, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Pandemic planning puts ethics in spotlight”last_img read more

‘That’s all, folks,’ for 19 Warner schemes

‘That’s all, folks,’ for 19 Warner schemes

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Earnings expert tackles bonuses

Earnings expert tackles bonuses

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Henrikh Mkhitaryan takes swipe at Unai Emery’s playing style and opens door to Arsenal return

Henrikh Mkhitaryan takes swipe at Unai Emery’s playing style and opens door to Arsenal return

first_imgHenrikh Mkhitaryan takes swipe at Unai Emery’s playing style and opens door to Arsenal return Comment The Armenian playmaker has impressed on loan for Roma this season (Picture: Getty)Henrikh Mkhitaryan has taken a swipe at former Arsenal manager Unai Emery’s playing style, suggesting he was too defensive, while he also opened the door to a potential return to the club.The Armenian playmaker, who moved to the Emirates in a swap deal for Alexis Sanchez back in 2018, has spent the season on loan at Roma and, despite a number of injury issues, delivered some impressive performances.Mkhitaryan is averaging a goal or assist every 90 minutes in the Italian capital and says he is thriving thanks to the attack-minded approach of his manager Paulo Fonseca – something he did not feel under Emery. FIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirusTo view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:43FullscreenFIFA and WHO team up to give you five ways to tackle spread of coronavirushttps://metro.co.uk/video/fifa-team-five-ways-tackle-spread-coronavirus-2131812/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.‘When I was at Arsenal, I had different things asked from me by the coach, people were expecting different things from here,’ Mkhitaryan explained in an interview with The Times.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTRead the latest updates: Coronavirus news live‘The philosophy of Emery was different from Fonseca, but here I’m feeling much better because we’re playing better football and I think it matched me.‘I prefer Fonseca’s football because we’re playing very offensively, we’re trying to have the ball all the time here and of course I like this kind of game.’More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalRoma boss Fonseca has frequently praised Mkhitaryan and would like to make his loan move permanent, though the 31-year-old admits he could return to Arsenal with the current football suspension potentially causing havoc with player contracts.Asked about his future, he continued: ‘I can’t say anything at the moment because the season is stopped, we don’t know when we’ll start playing again and what will happen in the summer. Mkhitaryan feels Emery’s more cautious style of play did not suit him (Picture: Getty)‘Football changes so quickly. One day you’re here, the other you’re there. You never know what can happen and what will happen with you.’With Italy on lockdown, Mkhitaryan also provided an update on how he is coping, adding: ‘We have the programme from the team for training at home, so I’m trying to keep myself fit.‘When I heard the situation wasn’t the best and everyone was asking us to stay home, I stopped going outside for a walk or a run.‘It’s better to stay inside and be an example to everyone, to show them that this is more important, to follow the rules and be at home.’MORE: Arsenal move to secure future of Real Madrid midfielder Dani Ceballos amid coronavirus crisisMORE: Cesc Fabregas opens up on Arsenal snub and Jose Mourinho chat that led to Chelsea moveFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page.center_img Metro Sport ReporterThursday 26 Mar 2020 7:52 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link5.2kShares Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more