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A test for Trumpism: Virginia Republicans seek new playbook

A test for Trumpism: Virginia Republicans seek new playbook

first_imgRICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The national Republican Party is at war with itself, struggling to reconcile a bitter divide between former President Donald Trump’s fierce loyalists and those who want Trumpism purged from their party. The GOP need only look across the Potomac River into Virginia to see the dangers that lurk if it cannot correct course. In just nine months, Virginia voters will elect a new governor in what marks the first significant test of the Republican Party’s strength in the post-Trump era. And in a Southern state that had a Republican governor as recently as 2014, Virginia’s 2021 Republican field is facing the prospect of a political disaster.last_img

Around campus

Around campus

first_imgPurple WeekThis week, Notre Dame’s Relay for Life will host “Purple Week,” a series of events to raise awareness about the annual American Cancer Society fundraiser.“Purple Week gives the campus community an opportunity to join in the fight against cancer,” Relay for Life student co-chair Amanda Romeros said.The week includes $5 boot camp classes at Rolfs, a “Why Do You Relay?” event on South Quad on Wednesday and a blood drive Friday. On Thursday, the dining halls will serve purple desserts, and students can register for the Relay for Life, which takes place in the Compton Family Ice Arena on April 17.For more information, visit relay.nd.eduCavanaugh Coin Wars Cavanaugh Hall’s new signature event, Cavanaugh Coin Wars, will take place this week. The fundraiser will benefit St. Margaret’s House, a South Bend day center for women and children.Through Friday, each dorm will have a jar in the dining halls and LaFortune Student Center. Coins put in the jar count for positive points, whereas dollar bills are negative. The dorm with the most points at the end receives a doughnut party.“All you have to do is go to the dining hall or go to [LaFortune Student Center], and most people are already there, so it’s a great way to make an impact without really having to do anything,” Cavanaugh signature event commissioner Gracie Linus said.Black Cultural Arts Council Fashion ShowThe Black Cultural Arts Council at Notre Dame will host its annual fashion show Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Century Center in South Bend. The show, “Risque,” will feature 30 students modeling in name-brand clothes as well as clothes from a variety of South Bend boutiques.“It is far from what people would deem a ‘normal’ fashion show,” fashion show coordinator Olivia Mitchell said. “Included in our show are choreographed scenes where our models portray characters, perform routines and generally just have a lot of fun while on stage.”Tickets are available for $10 at the LaFortune Box Office, and buses to the Century Center will be provided.WWI and Graphic NovelsThe Nanovic Institute of European Studies will sponsor a performance and live-drawing of several texts related to World War I on Wednesday.The event, titled “WWI in the Graphic Novels: A Drawing Cabaret,” will feature graphic novel artists Chloe Cruchaudet Ivan Petrus and Kris & Maël. Nanovic fellow and event moderator Olivier Morel said artists play an important role in understanding the Great War.“As creators, their art involves a lot of writing and storytelling, a strong relationship to the artistic and literary traditions, but also to photography, sociology and, of course, cinema,” Morel said.Morel said each of the artists chose a WWI-related text that inspired their work, which Film, Television and Theatre students Dylan Parent, Austin Hagwood, Anthony Murphy and Guillermo Alonso will act out. During their performances, the artists will draw the scene, and cameras will project the drawings for the audience to see. There will then be a discussion between the artists and the audience.“Everyone should be aware that this first world war of the 20th century has profoundly changed our world in so many ways: its geography, its society and of course, its culture, its art history,” Morel said.The event is free but ticketed. Tickets are available by contacting nanovic@nd.edulast_img read more

Blueberry Disease

Blueberry Disease

first_imgThe key to managing Exobasidium leaf and fruit spot disease in blueberries, which makes the fruit unmarketable, is one application of lime sulfur approximately two weeks prior to bud break, according to Jonathan Oliver, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension fruit pathologist.Exobasidium disease causes spots on the leaves and fruit, decreases the fruit’s size and, because of the fruit’s immaturity, gives it a bitter taste. The leaf spots eventually turn velvety and white and lead to early defoliation, and the spotted fruit is not fit for sale.Blueberry plants are currently dormant — they’re alive, but not actively growing. Oliver, who specializes in small fruits, believes that lime sulfur, a chemical spray used to control insects and fungi on fruit trees, can reduce the amount of inoculum carried over from the previous growing season. The application of lime sulfur will reduce disease occurrences for the upcoming year, he said.“This has the potential to almost completely control in-season Exobasidium disease on both the leaves and fruit,” Oliver said.Blueberry producers hope to rebound from a devastatingly low crop in 2017 due in large part to a late-season freeze last March. The freeze suppressed Georgia’s blueberry production, and growers lost about 70 percent of their crop.Georgia has experienced several bouts of freezing temperatures this winter, but those temperatures haven’t affected the still-dormant plants. Once the plants emerge from dormancy this spring, blueberry producers hope to avoid any subfreezing temperatures.The colder temperatures this winter may have a positive impact on reducing some blueberry diseases. In warmer temperatures, certain fungi can grow on leaves in greater numbers throughout the winter. This proliferation makes some diseases worse and allows them to occur earlier in the spring.“The colder weather we have been having should help to somewhat reduce, but not eliminate, carryover inoculum for some foliar diseases. However, other fungal diseases will be unaffected by the colder weather,” Oliver said.This year, growers must remain aggressive with fungicide spray programs because carryover inoculum will be prevalent in plantings that were not sprayed or well maintained in 2017, Oliver said.There are additional measures that blueberry producers can take to reduce disease pressure. Excessive water in the root zone is a key component in the development of root rot disease. Growers can reduce this threat by using raised beds to ensure that there’s adequate drainage and by planning proper irrigation for blueberry fields.Some diseases, like mummy berry, overwinter on infected berries. Growers can decrease the risk of this disease by burying or removing infected berries from the field, but these measures will not eliminate the disease, Oliver said.“Typically, in the warm, humid conditions of south Georgia, many fungal diseases can be devastating if not properly managed,” Oliver said.Georgia is the country’s No. 1 producer of blueberries. According to the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development, the statewide 2016 farm gate value for blueberries totaled $283.8 million. Blueberries accounted for 38.1 percent of Georgia’s fruit and nut production.last_img read more

Paddle Charles County

Paddle Charles County

first_imgexplorecharlescounty.com Refuel at one of the many unique restaurants in Charles County, from farm-to-table cuisine and local seafood to barbecue and homemade ice cream. Finish up with a drink at Blue Dyer Distilling Co. before settling in for a night at your bed & breakfast, campground, or hotel. Wake up ready to explore more of the adventures that await when you visit Charles County, Maryland.  Explore more than 100 abandoned ships dating back to the Revolutionary War and World War I at Mallows Bay Park. You can also see bald eagles, river otters, turtles, and more when you paddle this national marine sanctuary on the Potomac River. Take a virtual tour of this “Ghost Fleet” online through the Chesapeake Conservancy. Hop on Nanjemoy Creek from Friendship Farm Park. You can customize your trip length as the creek flows into the Potomac four miles from the park.  Bordered by the Potomac and Patuxent rivers, Charles County, Md. provides paddlers of all abilities the chance to discover the area’s history and natural wonders by boat. Just 30 miles from Washington, D.C., it is the perfect escape to the water and easily accessible.  When you are done on the water, check out the multi-use Indian Head Rail Trail. Discover 13.1 miles of paved trails through forests, natural wetlands, and farmland as well as other parks and wildlife along the way. Head to Bike Doctor for all your cycling needs and stop by Beacon Surplus to select your kayak, canoe, and water safety accessories. View the Port Tobacco River Park’s resident eagles, Chandler and Hope, from the wildlife observation decks. Take the time to check out the other museums, antique stores, and parks in the area, including Piscataway National Park.center_img If you need a boat for the day, check out Atlantic Kayak Company for single and double kayak rentals on Mattawoman Creek. They also offer guided trips, including a sunset or ship graveyard tour, if you want to dive deeper into the area’s history.  Charles County Paddle tributaries of the Potomac from two state parks in the county. Access the Port Tobacco River from the sandy soft launch during low tide at Chapel Point State Park. Explore Mattawoman Creek from the boat ramp at Smallwood State Park. Both parks provide easy access to more miles for paddling when you reach the tidal Potomac. Families will enjoy paddling Wheatly Lake at Gilbert Run Park. Rent a pedal boat, rowboat, canoe, or kayak for the afternoon.  last_img read more

Eye-watering $4.5 million deal for Gold Coast apartment

Eye-watering $4.5 million deal for Gold Coast apartment

first_imgPositioned on the 24th floor, the home featured 360 degree views, a large oceanfront balcony, media room and wine cellar. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago“Across the sector, the top end is moving really well,” Ms Cole said. “The Sydney and Melbourne markets are moving again and that relates back to us. “They are coming here for the sea-change and lifestyle and we have a lot to offer.”Ms Cole said there was a shortage of prestige properties available. “Once they get snapped up we don’t seem to have enough to replenish and there are certainly buyers out there,” she said. “There’s a big shortage of good property at the top end.” The apartment hit the market in September through a different agency with an auction campaign. It was later listed with a $4.805 million price tag before becoming an open listing which meant multiple agencies could try their hand at selling the property. A luxury skyhome at 2401/3 Northcliffe Tce, Surfers Paradise, has changed hands.A SKY-high sale has been notched for a Surfers Paradise apartment. The luxurious four-bedroom sub-penthouse in the Northcliffe Residences sold in an eye-watering $4.5 million deal. Lucy Cole Prestige Property agent Chris Boshoff penned the sale. Sydney buyers wanting an opulent holiday home secured the keys. MORE NEWS: Apartment prices soar as prices fallMORE NEWS: Coast one of the world’s best for prestige property Sydney buyers splashed $4.5 million on the apartment. The views were a big selling point.Agency head Lucy Cole said the buyers were looking beachside for the ultimate skyhome for their getaways. “They loved the location and the spaciousness the apartment had to offer with various areas for the family to use,” she said. “I think it was a very good buy.“Sometimes for established stock you’re paying $3.9 million and this was absolutely brand new, not been lived in and had glamour and luxury.” The family plan to use the four-bedroom pad as a holidayhome. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59last_img read more

“Mounting Body of Evidence” of Sweeping Harms of Marijuana Normalisation on Pregnant Women & Youth

“Mounting Body of Evidence” of Sweeping Harms of Marijuana Normalisation on Pregnant Women & Youth

first_imgMedia Release Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) 30 August 2019HHS Secretary: “Some state’s laws on marijuana may have changed, but the science has not, and the federal law has not.”(Alexandria, VA) – In the most significant event on marijuana policy during the Trump Administration, today the Department of Health and Human Services issued significant warnings regarding the physical and mental health implications of marijuana commercialization. During a press conference about marijuana broadly, government officials decried the normalization of marijuana and the harmful messages Americans are receiving on the drug.Additionally, the US Surgeon General released an advisory to the public concerning the damaging effects of marijuana use during pregnancy and on young, developing brains. In response, Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) president, Dr. Kevin Sabet, released the following statement:“Just like the famous advisory on tobacco in 1964, the significance of today’s marijuana advisory cannot be overstated. As the Surgeon General stated, ‘no amount of marijuana is safe for pregnant women or our youth.’ Big Marijuana and its promoters have consistently pushed blatant falsehoods and misinformation to suggest marijuana is safe, despite the large and growing of evidence to the contrary. Administration officials should be applauded for finally shining a light on the harms of today’s high potent marijuana.“We know marijuana use during pregnancy can lead to a wide range of harms including low birth weight and developmental problems. Even worse, marijuana use during pregnancy has been linked to a rare, fatal developmental disorder known as anencephaly. Marijuana can have incredibly deleterious effects on young minds and it is absolutely shameful, though not surprising, that the industry would push its wares and pseudo-science on young mothers.“Last year, 70% of dispensaries in Colorado were recommending high potency THC products to expectant mothers to ‘treat’ symptoms of morning sickness. Given the fact that these dispensaries are not staffed with medical professionals, this is greatly concerning. A large study from Canada looking at marijuana and pregnancy found negative effects well after birth:“Youth marijuana use is greatly concerning. A recent study found that one in five youth and one in 10 young adults who started using marijuana within the past 3 years have been diagnosed with a cannabis use disorder. Regular use of marijuana has been linked to IQ loss, psychosis, depression, and suicide.“We look forward to working with HHS and other federal government officials to help raise awareness to the harmful health impacts of marijuana commercialization and use. The future of our country depends on it.”last_img read more

Mane: Bambali celebrates Liverpool star after winning CAF award

Mane: Bambali celebrates Liverpool star after winning CAF award

first_img Malta Guinness excites viewers at Lemonade Movie premiere There was a wild celebration on the streets of Bambali shortly after the Senegalese was crowned Africa’s best player. Mane, meanwhile, has always shown love for Bambali, dedicating a chunk share of his salaries to to them. He built a school in his village worth €270,000, a hospital, mosque and stadium for his people. According to Mvslimfeed, he spent his holiday season to inspect the construction works that were going on the projects in Bambali. Aside from the building works, he also gave funds to many humanitarian projects, some of which had gulped $250,000 (N90,375,000). Senegalese striker earlier opened up about his roots and said he doesn’t need luxuries to be happy and dedicates much of his wages to charity. “Why would I want ten Ferraris, 20 diamond watches, or two planes? What will these objects do for me and for the world? ” Read Also:Here’s Mane’s humble speech at CAF POTY Awards I was hungry, and I had to work in the field; I survived hard times, played football barefooted, I did not have an education and many other things, but today with what I earn thanks to football, I can help my people,” Mane said. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Sadio Mane walked into the podium like a true African king- knowing that the stage was made for him – and won the CAF best player of the year award to send delight into the hearts of football lovers across the world. Loading… Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Most Beloved First Ladies Of All TimeWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?Top 10 Tiniest Phones Ever Made The recognition is, of course, overdue for the sensational Liverpool star who trailed behind his teammate Salah on the same podium in 2017 and 2018. But at the event held in Egypt on Tuesday night, January 8, Mane capped his prosperous year with the best prize in African continent, beating off stiff competition from Man City’s Riyad Mahrez and Liverpool’s Mo Salah. Donned in all black garment, the Senegalese star saw his huge influence both in national team and club recognised, with his win sending ray of light to his native hometown. In a video going viral, people of Bambali – a local village where Mane was born and raised, showered love to their idol in exclusive turn, as they marched out in multitude to watch their own crowned African football king.last_img read more

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through April 11

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through April 11

first_imgIMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, 191; 2. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, 150; 3. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, 149; 4. Kent Lewis Sr., Willis, Texas, 147; 5. Caleb Padgett, Madisonville, Texas, 131; 6. Travis “Blake” Cunningham, Silsbee, Texas, 118; 7. Grant Champlin, Hanford, Calif., 115; 8. Chris Hinson, Nederland, Texas, 114; 9. Theresa Waller, Montgomery, Texas, and Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, both 113; 11. Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., 112; 12. Daniel King, Conroe, Texas, 104; 13. Brooklyn Holland, Fresno, Calif., 98; 14. Brendan Warmerdam, Lemoore, Calif., and Michael Pombo, Easton, Calif., both 96; 16. Tommy Hall, Natchitoches, La., and Brandon Emmett, Caruthers, Calif., both 91; 18. Mauro Simone, Fresno, Calif., 90; 19. Lance Jackson, Kingsburg, Calif., 89; 20. Danny Burke, Crosby, Texas, 82. Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 572; 2. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 561; 3. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 526; 4. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 413; 5. Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, 387; 6. Chris Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 366; 7. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 331; 8. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 299; 9. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 252; 10. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 246; 11. Austin Moore, Axtell, Texas, 235; 12. Jared Baird, Norman, Okla., 232; 13. Kaden Honeycutt, Willow Park, Texas, 224; 14. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 221; 15. John “Jay” Coone, Weatherford, Texas, 204; 16. Cory Williams, Tahoka, Texas, 199; 17. Jeff Shepperd, Waco, Texas, 193; 18. Kyle Robinson, Pilot Point, Texas, 191; 19. Michael Martin, Kaufman, Texas, 189; 20. Brandon Geurin, Robinson, Texas, 188. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 251; 2. Joe Peterson, Chandler, Ariz., 217; 3. Nathan DeRagon, Peoria, Ariz., 215; 4. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 146; 5. Bradley Stafford, Glendale, Ariz., 143; 6. Kyle Cardinal, Paradise Valley, Ariz., 137; 7. Joshua Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 118; 8. Tathan Burkhart, Hays, Kan., and Adam Goff, Minot, N.D., both 116; 10. Jason Beshears, Yuma, Ariz., 111; 11. Max Zachrison, Surprise, Ariz., 104; 12. Jason Penny, Yuma, Ariz., 102; 13. Cody Williams, Minneapolis, Kan., 101; 14. Rick Hibbard, Yuma, Ariz., 100; 15. Francisco Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 95; 16. Brady J. Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 94; 17. Lyle Russell, Hays, Kan., 90; 18. Michael Whissen, Yuma, Ariz., 88; 19. Mike Erwin, Yuma, Ariz., 83; 20. Gerald Spalding Jr., Andrews, Texas, 79.  IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 628; 2. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 525; 3. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 448; 4. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 444; 5. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 431; 6. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, 400; 7. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 396; 8. A.J. Dancer, Red Rock, Texas, 385; 9. Gary Williams, Bonham, Texas, 373; 10. Bryan Schutte, Wayne, Okla., 363; 11. William “Joey” McCullough, Phoenix, Ariz., 354; 12. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 329; 13. Tyler Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 327; 14. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 301; 15. Tommy Fain, Abilene, Texas, and Douglas Kennemer, Rhome, Texas, both 293; 17. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 274; 18. Ryan Powers, Joshua, Texas, 271; 19. Blake Clark, Joshua, Texas, 264; 20. Gene Henrie, Cedar City, Utah, 251. IMCA Modifieds – 1. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 517; 2. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 484; 3. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 456; 4. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 423; 5. Jeff “Bubba” Stafford Jr., Wittmann, Ariz., 420; 6. Don Gumke, Jamestown, N.D., 403; 7. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 399; 8. Chris Morris, Taylor, Texas, 398; 9. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 395; 10. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 365; 11. Chris Elliott, Abilene, Texas, 354; 12. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo., 345; 13. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 343; 14. David Goode Sr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 334; 15. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 333; 16. Jeffrey Hoegh, New Caney, Texas, 327; 17. Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz., 311; 18. Don Banker, Austin, Texas, 306; 19. Brent Schlafmann, Bismarck, N.D., 291; 20. John Parmeley, Phoenix, Ariz., 286. Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 496; 2. Steven Bevills, Granbury, Texas, 469; 3. Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, 345; 4. Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, 319; 5. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 314; 6. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 313; 7. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 256; 8. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, 253; 9. William Creese, Springtown, Texas, 236; 10. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 228; 11. Scott Newbury, Rhome, Texas, 223; 12. Randy McNorton Jr., Alvord, Texas, 201; 13. Ryan Whisenant, Stephenville, Texas, 198; 14. Pamela Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 195; 15. Billy Butcher, Boyd, Texas, 193; 16. Randall Carty, Dallas, Texas, 137; 17. Johnny Clark, Cleburne, Texas, and James Morehead, Cleburne, Texas, both 136; 19. Jason Magouirk, Fort Worth, Texas, 134; 20. Frank Lackey, Joshua, Texas, 131. Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 605; 2. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 473; 3. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 470; 4. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 411; 5. Heath Dry, Phoenix, Ariz., 387; 6. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 372; 7. Taylor Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., 356; 8. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 353; 9. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 351; 10. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, 317; 11. Tate Johnson, Homestead, Mont., 314; 12. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., and Shelby Frye, Casa Grande, Ariz., both 309; 14. Bryan Miller, Glendale, Ariz., 269; 15. Bo Partain, Casa Grande, Ariz., 263; 16. Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., 257; 17. Brandyn Johnson, Mesa, Ariz., 252; 18. Kelly Jacobson, Fargo, N.D., 242; 19. Dennis Gates, Claypool, Ariz., 237; 20. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif., 219.last_img read more

Panama’s boxing legend Duran hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID

Panama’s boxing legend Duran hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID

first_imgPanama City: Boxing legend Roberto “Hands of Stone” Duran, a six-time world champion, had to be admitted to a hospital after being diagnosed with a non-life-threatening condition on Thursday with the coronavirus, his children said. “Test results have just arrived for my dad, and they confirm he is positive for COVID-19,” the legendary fighter’s son Robin Duran said on Instagram. “Thank God for now he doesn’t have symptoms beyond a cold. He is not in intensive care nor on a respirator, just under observation,” he added. Duran took part in 119 fights between the ages of 16 and 50 — with 103 wins and 16 defeats. IANSAlso watch: Murder in Betjan Tea Estate; Chowkidaar found murderedlast_img

Thompson stuns Fraser-Pryce to take 100m gold

Thompson stuns Fraser-Pryce to take 100m gold

first_imgELAINE Thompson ended fellow Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s reign as Olympic champion by winning the women’s 100 metre final at Rio 2016.Elaine Thompson (JAM) of Jamaica (R) hugs Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica after winning the women's 100m final. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson Elaine Thompson (JAM) of Jamaica (R) hugs Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica after winning the women’s 100m final. REUTERS/Lucy NicholsonFraser-Pryce had established herself as the queen of women’s sprinting with wins at the Beijing and London Games, in addition to claiming three World Championship titles.However, Thompson left the rest of the field trailing in her wake with a superb performance, clocking 10.71seconds – a time only she has beaten in 2016 – to win comfortably ahead of the United States’ Tori Bowie (10.83secs).Fraser-Pryce edged out Marie-Josee Ta Lou to grab bronze – both women given the same time of 10.86, while Dafne Schippers came fifth and English Gardner – who had run 10.74 at the US Olympic trials – came a disappointing seventh.Although the finalists were separated by a mere eight hundredths of a second across the three semi-finals, Thompson had looked the most accomplished qualifier as she ran 10.88 seconds easing up.The 24-year-old – a silver medallist over 200m at last year’s World Championships – then made a strong start in the final and never looked likely to be caught after opening up a lead at the halfway stage.Thompson duly surged home to come within a hundredth of the world-leading time she registered last month, with Bowie and Fraser-Pryce edging out Ta Lou in the battle for the remaining podium places.last_img read more