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Eye-watering $4.5 million deal for Gold Coast apartment

Eye-watering $4.5 million deal for Gold Coast apartment

first_imgPositioned on the 24th floor, the home featured 360 degree views, a large oceanfront balcony, media room and wine cellar. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa9 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag1 day ago“Across the sector, the top end is moving really well,” Ms Cole said. “The Sydney and Melbourne markets are moving again and that relates back to us. “They are coming here for the sea-change and lifestyle and we have a lot to offer.”Ms Cole said there was a shortage of prestige properties available. “Once they get snapped up we don’t seem to have enough to replenish and there are certainly buyers out there,” she said. “There’s a big shortage of good property at the top end.” The apartment hit the market in September through a different agency with an auction campaign. It was later listed with a $4.805 million price tag before becoming an open listing which meant multiple agencies could try their hand at selling the property. A luxury skyhome at 2401/3 Northcliffe Tce, Surfers Paradise, has changed hands.A SKY-high sale has been notched for a Surfers Paradise apartment. The luxurious four-bedroom sub-penthouse in the Northcliffe Residences sold in an eye-watering $4.5 million deal. Lucy Cole Prestige Property agent Chris Boshoff penned the sale. Sydney buyers wanting an opulent holiday home secured the keys. MORE NEWS: Apartment prices soar as prices fallMORE NEWS: Coast one of the world’s best for prestige property Sydney buyers splashed $4.5 million on the apartment. The views were a big selling point.Agency head Lucy Cole said the buyers were looking beachside for the ultimate skyhome for their getaways. “They loved the location and the spaciousness the apartment had to offer with various areas for the family to use,” she said. “I think it was a very good buy.“Sometimes for established stock you’re paying $3.9 million and this was absolutely brand new, not been lived in and had glamour and luxury.” The family plan to use the four-bedroom pad as a holidayhome. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59last_img read more

“Mounting Body of Evidence” of Sweeping Harms of Marijuana Normalisation on Pregnant Women & Youth

“Mounting Body of Evidence” of Sweeping Harms of Marijuana Normalisation on Pregnant Women & Youth

first_imgMedia Release Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) 30 August 2019HHS Secretary: “Some state’s laws on marijuana may have changed, but the science has not, and the federal law has not.”(Alexandria, VA) – In the most significant event on marijuana policy during the Trump Administration, today the Department of Health and Human Services issued significant warnings regarding the physical and mental health implications of marijuana commercialization. During a press conference about marijuana broadly, government officials decried the normalization of marijuana and the harmful messages Americans are receiving on the drug.Additionally, the US Surgeon General released an advisory to the public concerning the damaging effects of marijuana use during pregnancy and on young, developing brains. In response, Smart Approaches to Marijuana (SAM) president, Dr. Kevin Sabet, released the following statement:“Just like the famous advisory on tobacco in 1964, the significance of today’s marijuana advisory cannot be overstated. As the Surgeon General stated, ‘no amount of marijuana is safe for pregnant women or our youth.’ Big Marijuana and its promoters have consistently pushed blatant falsehoods and misinformation to suggest marijuana is safe, despite the large and growing of evidence to the contrary. Administration officials should be applauded for finally shining a light on the harms of today’s high potent marijuana.“We know marijuana use during pregnancy can lead to a wide range of harms including low birth weight and developmental problems. Even worse, marijuana use during pregnancy has been linked to a rare, fatal developmental disorder known as anencephaly. Marijuana can have incredibly deleterious effects on young minds and it is absolutely shameful, though not surprising, that the industry would push its wares and pseudo-science on young mothers.“Last year, 70% of dispensaries in Colorado were recommending high potency THC products to expectant mothers to ‘treat’ symptoms of morning sickness. Given the fact that these dispensaries are not staffed with medical professionals, this is greatly concerning. A large study from Canada looking at marijuana and pregnancy found negative effects well after birth:“Youth marijuana use is greatly concerning. A recent study found that one in five youth and one in 10 young adults who started using marijuana within the past 3 years have been diagnosed with a cannabis use disorder. Regular use of marijuana has been linked to IQ loss, psychosis, depression, and suicide.“We look forward to working with HHS and other federal government officials to help raise awareness to the harmful health impacts of marijuana commercialization and use. The future of our country depends on it.”last_img read more

Mane: Bambali celebrates Liverpool star after winning CAF award

Mane: Bambali celebrates Liverpool star after winning CAF award

first_img Malta Guinness excites viewers at Lemonade Movie premiere There was a wild celebration on the streets of Bambali shortly after the Senegalese was crowned Africa’s best player. Mane, meanwhile, has always shown love for Bambali, dedicating a chunk share of his salaries to to them. He built a school in his village worth €270,000, a hospital, mosque and stadium for his people. According to Mvslimfeed, he spent his holiday season to inspect the construction works that were going on the projects in Bambali. Aside from the building works, he also gave funds to many humanitarian projects, some of which had gulped $250,000 (N90,375,000). Senegalese striker earlier opened up about his roots and said he doesn’t need luxuries to be happy and dedicates much of his wages to charity. “Why would I want ten Ferraris, 20 diamond watches, or two planes? What will these objects do for me and for the world? ” Read Also:Here’s Mane’s humble speech at CAF POTY Awards I was hungry, and I had to work in the field; I survived hard times, played football barefooted, I did not have an education and many other things, but today with what I earn thanks to football, I can help my people,” Mane said. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Sadio Mane walked into the podium like a true African king- knowing that the stage was made for him – and won the CAF best player of the year award to send delight into the hearts of football lovers across the world. Loading… Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?7 Things That Actually Ruin Your PhoneCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Which Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Most Beloved First Ladies Of All TimeWhat Is A Black Hole In Simple Terms?Top 10 Tiniest Phones Ever Made The recognition is, of course, overdue for the sensational Liverpool star who trailed behind his teammate Salah on the same podium in 2017 and 2018. But at the event held in Egypt on Tuesday night, January 8, Mane capped his prosperous year with the best prize in African continent, beating off stiff competition from Man City’s Riyad Mahrez and Liverpool’s Mo Salah. Donned in all black garment, the Senegalese star saw his huge influence both in national team and club recognised, with his win sending ray of light to his native hometown. In a video going viral, people of Bambali – a local village where Mane was born and raised, showered love to their idol in exclusive turn, as they marched out in multitude to watch their own crowned African football king.last_img read more

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through April 11

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through April 11

first_imgIMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, 191; 2. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, 150; 3. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, 149; 4. Kent Lewis Sr., Willis, Texas, 147; 5. Caleb Padgett, Madisonville, Texas, 131; 6. Travis “Blake” Cunningham, Silsbee, Texas, 118; 7. Grant Champlin, Hanford, Calif., 115; 8. Chris Hinson, Nederland, Texas, 114; 9. Theresa Waller, Montgomery, Texas, and Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, both 113; 11. Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., 112; 12. Daniel King, Conroe, Texas, 104; 13. Brooklyn Holland, Fresno, Calif., 98; 14. Brendan Warmerdam, Lemoore, Calif., and Michael Pombo, Easton, Calif., both 96; 16. Tommy Hall, Natchitoches, La., and Brandon Emmett, Caruthers, Calif., both 91; 18. Mauro Simone, Fresno, Calif., 90; 19. Lance Jackson, Kingsburg, Calif., 89; 20. Danny Burke, Crosby, Texas, 82. Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 572; 2. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 561; 3. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 526; 4. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 413; 5. Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, 387; 6. Chris Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 366; 7. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 331; 8. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 299; 9. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 252; 10. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 246; 11. Austin Moore, Axtell, Texas, 235; 12. Jared Baird, Norman, Okla., 232; 13. Kaden Honeycutt, Willow Park, Texas, 224; 14. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 221; 15. John “Jay” Coone, Weatherford, Texas, 204; 16. Cory Williams, Tahoka, Texas, 199; 17. Jeff Shepperd, Waco, Texas, 193; 18. Kyle Robinson, Pilot Point, Texas, 191; 19. Michael Martin, Kaufman, Texas, 189; 20. Brandon Geurin, Robinson, Texas, 188. IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 251; 2. Joe Peterson, Chandler, Ariz., 217; 3. Nathan DeRagon, Peoria, Ariz., 215; 4. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 146; 5. Bradley Stafford, Glendale, Ariz., 143; 6. Kyle Cardinal, Paradise Valley, Ariz., 137; 7. Joshua Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 118; 8. Tathan Burkhart, Hays, Kan., and Adam Goff, Minot, N.D., both 116; 10. Jason Beshears, Yuma, Ariz., 111; 11. Max Zachrison, Surprise, Ariz., 104; 12. Jason Penny, Yuma, Ariz., 102; 13. Cody Williams, Minneapolis, Kan., 101; 14. Rick Hibbard, Yuma, Ariz., 100; 15. Francisco Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 95; 16. Brady J. Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 94; 17. Lyle Russell, Hays, Kan., 90; 18. Michael Whissen, Yuma, Ariz., 88; 19. Mike Erwin, Yuma, Ariz., 83; 20. Gerald Spalding Jr., Andrews, Texas, 79.  IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 628; 2. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 525; 3. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 448; 4. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 444; 5. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 431; 6. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, 400; 7. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 396; 8. A.J. Dancer, Red Rock, Texas, 385; 9. Gary Williams, Bonham, Texas, 373; 10. Bryan Schutte, Wayne, Okla., 363; 11. William “Joey” McCullough, Phoenix, Ariz., 354; 12. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 329; 13. Tyler Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 327; 14. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 301; 15. Tommy Fain, Abilene, Texas, and Douglas Kennemer, Rhome, Texas, both 293; 17. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 274; 18. Ryan Powers, Joshua, Texas, 271; 19. Blake Clark, Joshua, Texas, 264; 20. Gene Henrie, Cedar City, Utah, 251. IMCA Modifieds – 1. Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., 517; 2. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 484; 3. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 456; 4. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 423; 5. Jeff “Bubba” Stafford Jr., Wittmann, Ariz., 420; 6. Don Gumke, Jamestown, N.D., 403; 7. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 399; 8. Chris Morris, Taylor, Texas, 398; 9. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 395; 10. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 365; 11. Chris Elliott, Abilene, Texas, 354; 12. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo., 345; 13. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 343; 14. David Goode Sr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 334; 15. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 333; 16. Jeffrey Hoegh, New Caney, Texas, 327; 17. Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz., 311; 18. Don Banker, Austin, Texas, 306; 19. Brent Schlafmann, Bismarck, N.D., 291; 20. John Parmeley, Phoenix, Ariz., 286. Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 496; 2. Steven Bevills, Granbury, Texas, 469; 3. Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, 345; 4. Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, 319; 5. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 314; 6. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 313; 7. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 256; 8. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, 253; 9. William Creese, Springtown, Texas, 236; 10. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 228; 11. Scott Newbury, Rhome, Texas, 223; 12. Randy McNorton Jr., Alvord, Texas, 201; 13. Ryan Whisenant, Stephenville, Texas, 198; 14. Pamela Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 195; 15. Billy Butcher, Boyd, Texas, 193; 16. Randall Carty, Dallas, Texas, 137; 17. Johnny Clark, Cleburne, Texas, and James Morehead, Cleburne, Texas, both 136; 19. Jason Magouirk, Fort Worth, Texas, 134; 20. Frank Lackey, Joshua, Texas, 131. Karl Kustoms Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 605; 2. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 473; 3. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 470; 4. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 411; 5. Heath Dry, Phoenix, Ariz., 387; 6. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 372; 7. Taylor Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., 356; 8. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 353; 9. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 351; 10. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, 317; 11. Tate Johnson, Homestead, Mont., 314; 12. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., and Shelby Frye, Casa Grande, Ariz., both 309; 14. Bryan Miller, Glendale, Ariz., 269; 15. Bo Partain, Casa Grande, Ariz., 263; 16. Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., 257; 17. Brandyn Johnson, Mesa, Ariz., 252; 18. Kelly Jacobson, Fargo, N.D., 242; 19. Dennis Gates, Claypool, Ariz., 237; 20. Kevin Johnson, Bakersfield, Calif., 219.last_img read more

Panama’s boxing legend Duran hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID

Panama’s boxing legend Duran hospitalized after being diagnosed with COVID

first_imgPanama City: Boxing legend Roberto “Hands of Stone” Duran, a six-time world champion, had to be admitted to a hospital after being diagnosed with a non-life-threatening condition on Thursday with the coronavirus, his children said. “Test results have just arrived for my dad, and they confirm he is positive for COVID-19,” the legendary fighter’s son Robin Duran said on Instagram. “Thank God for now he doesn’t have symptoms beyond a cold. He is not in intensive care nor on a respirator, just under observation,” he added. Duran took part in 119 fights between the ages of 16 and 50 — with 103 wins and 16 defeats. IANSAlso watch: Murder in Betjan Tea Estate; Chowkidaar found murderedlast_img

Thompson stuns Fraser-Pryce to take 100m gold

Thompson stuns Fraser-Pryce to take 100m gold

first_imgELAINE Thompson ended fellow Jamaican Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce’s reign as Olympic champion by winning the women’s 100 metre final at Rio 2016.Elaine Thompson (JAM) of Jamaica (R) hugs Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica after winning the women's 100m final. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson Elaine Thompson (JAM) of Jamaica (R) hugs Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica after winning the women’s 100m final. REUTERS/Lucy NicholsonFraser-Pryce had established herself as the queen of women’s sprinting with wins at the Beijing and London Games, in addition to claiming three World Championship titles.However, Thompson left the rest of the field trailing in her wake with a superb performance, clocking 10.71seconds – a time only she has beaten in 2016 – to win comfortably ahead of the United States’ Tori Bowie (10.83secs).Fraser-Pryce edged out Marie-Josee Ta Lou to grab bronze – both women given the same time of 10.86, while Dafne Schippers came fifth and English Gardner – who had run 10.74 at the US Olympic trials – came a disappointing seventh.Although the finalists were separated by a mere eight hundredths of a second across the three semi-finals, Thompson had looked the most accomplished qualifier as she ran 10.88 seconds easing up.The 24-year-old – a silver medallist over 200m at last year’s World Championships – then made a strong start in the final and never looked likely to be caught after opening up a lead at the halfway stage.Thompson duly surged home to come within a hundredth of the world-leading time she registered last month, with Bowie and Fraser-Pryce edging out Ta Lou in the battle for the remaining podium places.last_img read more

Ronaldo Wins Fifth Ballon d’Or to Equal Messi’s Record

Ronaldo Wins Fifth Ballon d’Or to Equal Messi’s Record

first_imgReal Madrid forward Cristiano Ronaldo Thursday defeated Barcelona’s Lionel Messi to win the Ballon d’Or award for the fifth time – and the second year in a row.The victory took the 32-year-old Portugal international level with 30-year-old Argentine Messi, who won the most recent of his five awards in 2015.Last season, Ronaldo helped Real Madrid win the Champions League and their first La Liga title since 2012.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img

Big Hit – Concussions and the culture of athletics

Big Hit – Concussions and the culture of athletics

first_imgHigh impact · Students and alumni shared their experiences coping with the lasting impact of concussions. According to Popular Mechanics, a defensive back can exert up to 1,600 pounds of force per tackle. – Brian Ji | Daily TrojanIt takes one hit to change a life.One hard hit, fall or tackle. That can be enough for a concussion. The result, at best, is a few hours of headache, dizziness and nausea. At worst, the injury leads to a lifetime of excruciating pain and depression.Concussions aren’t a new topic. They’ve made headlines again and again. According to studies by the CDC, anywhere from 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions are incurred in the U.S. every year. It’s an inescapable part of athletics, yet experts remain unsure how to diagnose a concussion, and even more unsure how to treat one. Proper tools for prevention, diagnosis and treatment are still under research, but the main key to solving the concussion problem revolves around the culture of athletics itself.The day Seau diedFew days have changed the world of football more than the day that USC alumnus Junior Seau died. It was a Wednesday in May 2012. Seau’s girlfriend found him sprawled on the floor, a self-inflicted gunshot wound to his chest. He left behind no note, only the scrawled lyrics of his favorite country music song — “Who I Ain’t” — on a piece of paper on the kitchen counter.A year later, studies by the National Institutes of Health showed that Seau had a degenerative brain disease caused by multiple concussions when he committed suicide.It came as a shock to the culture of football. Seau was a 12-time Pro-Bowler, 1992 NFL Defensive Player of the Year and a two-time AFC champion who would be posthumously inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame. He played hurt, he played hard and he challenged every offense he faced with his athleticism and his relentlessness. But, in the end, every hit and tackle was chipping away at Seau’s brain. The game of football killed one of its finest players.The day that Seau died, former USC quarterback Todd Marinovich received a text from a teammate. It had been years since he’d seen Seau, but he’d followed his former teammate’s career with pride. When he read that Seau was dead, that Seau had taken his own life, he couldn’t believe it.“It was unthinkable,” Marinovich said. “It floored me. It took my breath away. That wasn’t the Seau I knew.”The Seau he knew was so full of life he almost burst with it. He walked into practice with a grin that crinkled the corners of his eyes. He spent endless hours in the weight room when he was sidelined for low grades. He was single-minded, too focused on football to be caught at frat parties or bars. And he was joyful — “God, was he joyful,” Marinovich said — in love with the game, in love with the team and in love with life.And 23 years later, he killed himself. It was unthinkable, Marinovich said.One year later, Marinovich received another text. This one was more expected. Another former teammate, a linebacker,  had died from extreme hypertension after a long struggle with alcoholism. His name was Scott Ross. Marinovich had spent the last year on the phone, trying to help Ross fight a battle with his own mind.The Ross he’d been speaking to was not the same Ross he adored in college, who once chased Marinovich across campus for 40 minutes, shouting out a mix of curses and laughter. Ross had changed.In his final years, he was inconsolable. Something was deeply disturbed. Marinovich couldn’t put a finger on it, but he felt the desperation in Ross’s voice as they spoke on the phone. His friend was damaged.“What both of them became … It was different,” Marinovich said. “Something broke in them. We need to figure out how to keep these players from being broken.”Marinovich lost two teammates in two years. They were both men he looked up to, men whose presences  he cherished. They were also both linebackers.“It’s not an easy job,” Marinovich said of the position. “They take hits again and again and again. It’s relentless. It’s exhausting to watch. I couldn’t do what they did. I’m not sure if anyone is really meant to.”According to a study by Popular Mechanics, the average defensive back unloads up to 1,600 pounds of force in a single tackle, often resulting in a G-load three times the force of a barrel roll in a fighter jet. A defensive player might land 100 of these hits in a single game, leading to concussion after concussion.There wasn’t a culture surrounding concussions when Marinovich was playing with Seau and Ross. When they were playing, an especially hard hit to the head provoked a quick sideline check-up. If the trainer diagnosed a concussion, the player sat out for a play, maybe two. But then they went back in the game. They almost always went back in.“No player wants to sit,” Marinovich said. “We all wanted back in. Junior, you could try to drag him off the field, and he would fight you the whole way. I’ve had concussions, and I’m certain Junior and Scott and all of those guys had concussions, more than we probably know.”The culture is different now. Athletes receive concussion education at the start of each season. Last year, the Pac-12 conference cut down the number of contact practices that football teams are allowed to hold and launched a $3.6 million per year Head Trauma Task Force program. But football has only become more intense: the players bigger, the hits harder.“It’s a violent sport,” Marinovich said. “And it’s a beautiful sport in its violence, its physical nature. That will never change.”It’s not just footballSenior Sarah Urke can still remember the day she lost her Olympics dreams: Oct. 27, 2009.Rewind to the start of that summer, when Urke was 16 and life was almost perfect. She moved to Santa Barbara to train with the Aquamaids, a premier synchronized swimming team that groomed athletes for the Olympics. She had no goals for the future besides an Olympic gold medal.Then, during practice on Oct. 27, a teammate’s kick accidentally slammed into the side of Urke’s head. She surfaced in a daze. Urke sat out for five minutes, swallowed a handful of ibuprofen and dove back in to finish practice. The next morning, she woke up to a dangerous realization — something was horribly wrong.Urke felt like she was floating. Her head pounded. Her thoughts felt disjointed. She was rushed to the hospital, then referred to a neurologist who had no formal training in treating concussions. He told her to return to physical activity “as tolerated,” so she ignored her symptoms and kept swimming.That was a mistake. Each day was worse, plagued with dizziness and headaches. A new doctor told her to stop all activity, to stay home from school and avoid watching television.But it didn’t get better.When she returned to school in January, Urke couldn’t make it through a class. In February, she moved back to Minnesota and began to process that she might not be going to the Olympics anytime soon.More than a year later, after countless consultations, a combination of rest, upper cervical realignment and physical therapy finally began to relieve Urke’s symptoms. But at this point, she had missed a full year of high school, spending most of it in bed, listening to audiobooks. And Urke had lost synchronized swimming, the entire focus of her future.Urke wasn’t a football player. She was a dedicated athlete in a non-contact sport with a likely prospect of making the 2012 Olympic team. But on Oct. 27, 2009, a concussion shattered her world, proving that any athlete can suffer from the effects of head trauma.Now a USC student, Urke has dedicated herself to the world of concussions. She leads support groups for other concussion victims, heads a club that raises awareness and is dedicating her research as a pre-physical therapy student to treatments for head trauma. Her main goal is to create a better understanding of how to treat a concussion.“I was so eager to keep swimming that I just powered through the pain,” Urke said. “I know now that I probably hurt myself even more, just with those few weeks that I kept swimming. Athletes have to know when to stop. If you’re in pain, don’t fight through it. It’s not strong to fight through pain — that pain is a sign that your body needs to slow down, or stop, in order to heal.”Searching for a solutionWhen it comes to recovery, pain is the ultimate sign that an athlete should stop activity. But what is the cure for a concussion? It’s a question that baffled Urke for years and that continues to challenge experts in the field.One of the USC faculty members helping Urke to answer this question is Dr. David Baron, vice chair of the Department of Psychiatry and a national leader in concussions research. This spring, a piece of technology, Brain Injury Research Strategies, designed by Baron, won the Maseeh Entrepreneurship Prize Competition, allowing him to test a new way to approach concussion diagnosis.When discussing diagnoses, Baron emphasized a little-known truth about concussions — they don’t require direct contact to the head. Due to the structure of the head, the brain is relatively loosely fit into the skull. During a collision, a player’s head might whip around, causing the brain to “slosh” against the sides of the skull. This means that a jarring shock to the torso can result in a serious concussion without the head-receiving contact.“The nastiest concussion I ever saw came from a player being hit in the shoulder,” Baron said. “It’s all about the trauma that the brain is undergoing, and oftentimes that has nothing to do with an athlete hitting their head.”This makes it even more difficult to notice when a player incurs a concussion — especially in contact sports such as football or soccer, where collisions are a necessary part of the game. At USC, Director of Athletic Medicine Russ Romano trains athletic staff to observe athletes for symptoms, especially after noticeable collisions.“An athletic trainer is trained to observe the activity and [train] their student-athletes to look for signs and symptoms of concussion,” Romano said. “USC Athletics has taken great strides to educate all student-athletes about the signs and symptoms of concussion and the need to report those signs and symptoms immediately.”Though trainers can pull athletes if they’re concerned, it often comes down to a test to determine if that player remains sidelined from future play. The most popular test is the ImPACT test, a computerized system that tracks an athlete’s cognitive abilities before and after an injury. Though it doesn’t actually diagnose athletes with concussions, the ImPACT test works as a first step toward treatment.There is, however, a major flaw in the ImPACT test’s accuracy, Baron said. ImPACT relies on a baseline test, taken by each athlete at the beginning of the season. After a notable collision, the athlete retakes the test. If performance is lower than the baseline, then the athlete is considered at-risk and is sidelined until a doctor gives a proper diagnosis. Though this works for many athletes, Baron said that it is extremely easy for determined athletes to trick the test by purposefully underperforming their baseline.“There will always be players who want to play through it, to keep fighting through injuries even when their body is begging them to stop,” Baron said. “And those are the players that will get around [the ImPACT test]. What we need is a solution, some type of diagnosis or test, that can’t be cheated.”This is the focus of Baron’s work with BIRS, which tracks eye movement and notes slower reaction times. It is harder to fake eye movement than it is to flunk a baseline ImPACT test. Baron and his team hope that this improvement will allow for more accurate results.What comes after a concussion diagnosis is just as uncertain. Baron said most professionals agree that full rest is necessary after a concussion, followed by a gradual return to full activity. But the timing of concussion recovery remains imperfect and frustrating for concussion experts.“The problem is that, when it comes down to it, there’s way more that we don’t know about concussions than we do know,” Baron said. “There’s no perfect way to treat a concussion, and different things work for different people. Some players can take huge hit after huge hit, get up, and be perfectly fine. Others, it takes one hit and they’re done, career over. We don’t understand it, not yet.”To combat this lack of knowledge, Baron stressed that precaution is a necessity in avoiding life-altering damage. Yet, while new restrictions and safer helmets can soften the blows that cause concussions, prevention is a game with too many factors to control. Treatment, Baron said, will change the world of concussions, and it begins with the players themselves.It’s an unglamorous truth, but a vital one — there isn’t a cure for concussions.The injury’s danger is that a bulk of the responsibility in the healing process falls directly upon the athletes themselves — athletes who are often young, inexperienced and hungry to constantly play, perform and prove themselves in their sport. In this dynamic, Baron believes that coaches and trainers alike must train their athletes to truly believe that “toughing it out” is neither admirable nor responsible.In Marinovich’s days of playing, a rub-some-dirt-in-it mentality was accepted, but its consequences are manifesting themselves now.  Concussions are part of popular culture, but their ultimate solution is still far off and intangible. In the meantime, athletes must do the best they can, or pay hefty prices like Urke did six years ago.“I lost years of my life because of a single kick to my head,” Urke said. “And many others pay a far steeper price. It comes down to whether or not we’re willing to make a change in who we are and how we think about our bodies and our brains. In the end, you only get one brain in this life. You have to protect it at all costs.”Editor’s Note: A previous version of this article incorrectly stated that Scott Ross had died of suicide. Ross died of extreme hypertension with alcohol poisoning.  It also incorrectly stated that Ross was part of the 1989 team’s secondary; he was not.last_img read more

Nigeria Proposes to Host 2022 Youth Games

Nigeria Proposes to Host 2022 Youth Games

first_img“I want to commend the IOC for developing a mechanism for Africa to be taken along through the changes introduced in the organisation of the Youth Olympics. I want to assure you that the capacity of the country to deliver is not in doubt. We will ensure that we package a brand of the Youth Games which after 2022, will set an agenda for the IOC to emulate.” Abuja is ready to host because we have hosted international competitions in the past. Moreover, the IOC has emphasised that countries seeking to host the games should not build new structures but improve on their existing ones or make use of temporary facilities which will be dismantled after the games. We have the organisational capacity, the experience and the technical know-how to host.“Abuja as a city has most of the requirements as enumerated to us by the IOC in a video presentation.“We hope that at the end of the day, Nigeria will be chosen to host the 2022 Games for Africa,” Dalung said.Earlier, the IOC members led by Associate Director for the Youth Olympic Games, Antoine Goetschy, stated in their video presentation that the process of securing the bid to host the games will cost nothing to enable weaker countries with the potentials to host the event.“We are here to see what you have to propose and to show you an overview of what we want in a host city. The objective of our visit is for the proposing host nation to understand the strategic alignment and stakeholders engagement and the potential operational footprint”Other criteria for hosting the games as presented in the video include demonstration of existing international and youth strategies, prior experience in hosting major events, motivation of the relevant authorities and stakeholders for hosting the Youth Games, dedicated and permanent fields of play, potential accommodation solutions for NOC team delegations, existing indoor multipurpose arenas, potential sites for outdoor festival space and discussions on how hosting the YOG 2022 can act as a catalyst for further development.The members comprising Gilbert Felli, Senior Adviser, Melina Simm, Advisor and Mathieu Pouret, YOG Manager undertook an inspection tour of the Abuja National Stadium and other facilities yesterday while discussions to select the host country continue.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Nigeria has officially made a proposal to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to host the 2022 Youth Olympic Games in Abuja.At a video presentation held in Abuja on Sunday, the Nigerian delegation comprising the Minister of Youth and Sports, Solomon Dalung, the Permanent Secretary Adesola Olusade, the Nigeria Olympic Committee President Habu Gumel, officials of the Ministry of Youth and Sports, and the Federal Capital Territory, Dalung assured the visiting members of the IOC that Abuja will be ready to host the games if Nigeria gets the nod.In his remarks, the minister commended the IOC for considering an African host for the event.last_img read more

LA Clippers close road trip with victory over New Orleans

LA Clippers close road trip with victory over New Orleans

first_imgNEW ORLEANS >> DeAndre Jordan had his fists clenched and his muscles flexed and he howled in satisfaction. Jamal Crawford and Alan Anderson hopped off the Clippers bench, Friday in New Orleans, to celebrate with their teammate.He didn’t jump over Jrue Holiday for a lob. He didn’t block an Anthony Davis shot off Pierre the Pelican. He, along with the four other Clipper players on the court, forced a 24-second shot-clock violation.It was cause for exuberance.“That’s where we create our energy,” Blake Griffin said. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error And, like they’ve come to figure out, they’re at their best when it’s their defense leading to offense. In the second half, the Clippers held the Pelicans to just 39 points, closing out their road trip with a convincing victory over a team that had won five of their last seven prior to Friday.“Our defense in the second half is why we won,” Clippers coach Doc Rivers said. “Offensively, it’s clear. When we play defense, we score a lot of points.”The Clippers didn’t have a lot of transition tries in the second half, converting on their only two, but the defense ignited the team’s pace and passing.With the Clippers getting stops, the ball swung from player to player, as the Clippers searched for the best possible shot. Sometimes, it was a Luc Mbah a Moute 3 (15 points), sometimes it was Crawford wide open with the defense collapsed on Griffin.Two of the Clippers’ five turnovers in the second half came from over-passing, including one where Jordan got caught standing in the paint when his teammates just kept passing.“When you become a defensive team with that mindset, you don’t want to take bad shots because you know how hard you had to work defensive to get the darn ball,” Rivers said. “I think that’s what translates into extra passes. ‘Don’t come down and jack a bad shot –we just worked 23 seconds to get the ball. Don’t come down and take a bad shot.’”Rivers said he thinks his team understands that, but he needs them to understand something else, too. It was great that the Clippers rallied to finish their season-long trip 3-3 with back-to-back wins. But, .500 isn’t the standard he wants this team to live up to.“I think we’re better than that. I don’t think we should go .500 on a road trip. I think we should be better than that.“…We’re asking a lot, but if you want to be special, you’ve got ask a lot.”center_img Somehow, after six games in six cities, the Clippers had plenty of it Friday night, out-running the Pelicans 114-96 to finish the trip .500.The bench howled for the forced turnovers. The players celebrated the fruits of their ball movement, nailing big 3-point shot after 3-point shot. And, they celebrated leaving the building, as they started their trip back home for the first time in nearly two weeks.The 24-second violation came midway through the third quarter with Griffin, the most rested Clipper, providing the energy on offense. As the lead stretched from three to 15, he scored 11 of his team’s points during a 17-5 run that put the Pelicans at a comfortable distance.Griffin out-scored Davis 27 to 21, to go with 10 rebounds and four assists. Jamal Crawford scored 21 off the Clipper bench, and Chris Paul nearly had his second triple-double in three games, finishing with 17 points, 13 assists and eight rebounds.“I thought the (Clippers) controlled the game,” New Orleans coach Alvin Gentry said.last_img read more