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Gay students discuss coming out at Notre Dame

Gay students discuss coming out at Notre Dame

first_imgEditor’s note: This is the second installment in a three-part series about the experience of LGBTQ students at Notre Dame in lightof recent requests that the University grant club status to a gay-straight alliance. Before coming to Notre Dame, senior Jason G’Sell said he anticipated the University would be a place where he could come to terms with his faith and sexuality, whereas in high school, only a few friends knew he was gay.   “I wanted to go to college and be an out person,” he said. “I wanted people to have this assumption that clearly, I had been out forever.” For gay students, college presents the opportunity to start fresh with new friends and a new environment. Yet students said deciding when to come out can be an intensely personal decision that often involves overcoming both internal and external boundaries. Sophomore Mia Lillis said she was prepared to be open about her sexual orientation before coming to Notre Dame, but waited a month into her freshman year to come out because of her experience with freshman orientation. She said after telling her roommates, word “gradually got out” to the rest of her dorm. “[My roommates] were perfectly awesome with it,” she said. “I didn’t encounter any problems with anyone in the dorm.” However, Lillis did encounter some trials in coming out that she said are unique to the campus environment found at Notre Dame. “You take on such a big responsibility when you come out here. Not that necessarily you are going to receive a lot of discrimination, but you are taking on the role of educating people,” she said. “A lot of people here have not met gay people before coming to Notre Dame. That gets really tiring after a while, to explain over and over again.” For those who do wish to come out, the environment at Notre Dame can be daunting. Senior Sam Costanzo said the campus environment initially prevented him from being open about his sexual orientation. “I wanted to be who I was publicly,” he said. “I knew I couldn’t because it was just so grating. It rubbed up against so many gendered expectations of people here.” Costanzo said he was cautious whom he came out to when he came to Notre Dame, waiting until second semester of freshman year to come out to people in his dorm. A difficult experience Costanzo said being a gay student at Notre Dame was not the only thing he struggled with freshman year. He overstretched himself academically, struggled with his faith and coming from a largely Hispanic area of Texas, experienced “culture shock” at Notre Dame. As a result, Costanzo said he attended University counseling for most of his freshman year. The year culminated when Costanzo attempted to kill himself by swallowing several different medications, but could not keep them down. After the incident, his rector took him to the hospital where Costanzo called his parents, his academic advisor and his older sister, who attended Notre Dame at the time. Costanzo said his sister chastised him for not approaching family members for help. He said he was angered by her reaction, as she hadn’t shown concern before. “I knew she was wrong,” he said. “It was infuriating, the supposed value she was placing in our family relationships because for me, they had been compromised a while ago.” Following his freshman year, Costanzo took a medical withdrawal from Notre Dame and studied at the University of Texas at El Paso. He said he decided to return to Notre Dame both for academic and personal reasons. “I knew if I was going to really develop on a philosophical or spiritual level personally, in relation to Catholicism and the tradition I was raised in, I was going to have to come back here,” he said. “There wasn’t going to be a better place for me to do that.” Deciding when to come out Lillis, who came out as bisexual in middle school and later as a lesbian in high school, said her openness with her sexuality was swiftly challenged during freshman orientation. “I was not planning on being in the closet per se, but Frosh-O kind of changed my mind … It basically set the precedent that being straight is assumed here,” she said. “I guess I didn’t really feel comfortable enough with myself to correct that assumption.”  Students encounter a heterosexual mentality immediately upon arriving on campus with freshman orientation, G’Sell said. “Immediately you get there, and you are paired up with a girl dorm, and you’re tied to a girl’s wrist and you’re walking around together and you’re supposed to find your wife,” he said. “Everything is focused on these heterosexual relationships.” Sometimes, coming out during college is not a given. Senior Rocky Stroud said he had no immediate plans to come out at Notre Dame, as he wished to keep his sexual orientation private. “I didn’t think people needed to know. I didn’t want all those pestering questions like ‘When did it start? How are you doing? How did your parents take it? Did any of your friends change?’” he said. “I didn’t want all of those questions you don’t want to answer. I didn’t want my life to change.” However, Stroud said a friend revealed Stroud’s sexual orientation at a party while he was with his older sister. He said his coming out experience was not ideal, as he did not want his older sister, a student at Saint Mary’s, to find out in such a way. “It was an emotional rollercoaster those few days, mainly because I was at a party with my sister,” he said. “When she found out, she had a meltdown. She was in the bathroom crying.” With his younger sister and mother in town that same weekend for a football game, Stroud said he came out in one fell swoop. “It all happened in one day — 24 hours, done.” Though he said the circumstances for his coming out experience were less than ideal, Stroud said he is ultimately glad it happened because he would not have been able to come out on his own. “I wish it happened differently, [but] I’m okay with the fact it happened, because I don’t think I would have had the courage or determination or necessity to come out myself,” he said. Faith and sexuality Though Costanzo said he is not a practicing Catholic anymore, it wasn’t until he set foot on the Notre Dame campus that the relationship between his faith and sexuality became a problem. “The religious thing and the gay thing were two separate things in high school, and it wasn’t until I got here that they were really convergent,” he said. “This deeply personal, meaningful but not all-encompassing aspect of who [I am] is incompatible in some aspects with [my] faith.” Like Costanzo, G’Sell said he chose to attend Notre Dame for reasons relating to his faith. He thought Notre Dame would be a school where he could come to terms with his sexual orientation as it related to being a practicing Catholic. However, G’Sell said he soon realized the process of reconciling the two was not going to be as easy as he thought. “Even though you have some incredibly intelligent Catholics here, no one has the answers,” he said. “There is no easy solution to reconciling these two things.” G’Sell said he approached his rector in Duncan Hall to help deal with the relationship between his faith and sexuality. “He didn’t give me any sort of mind-blowing answer and he didn’t have any solutions for me, but what he did do was really important,” he said. “He just welcomed me, not only to the hall, but to the Church.” G’Sell said there was another benefit to living in Duncan, a new dorm at the time. “I felt it was important because [Duncan] didn’t have an identity and there was no stereotype,” he said. “I know it is much more difficult for guys that live in dorms that have really strong heterosexual identities.” ‘I’m grateful it hasn’t been a walk in the park’ Had she attended a different school, Lillis said she believes she would have approached coming out very differently than she has at Notre Dame. “I think I definitely would have come out off the bat, because I was in the closet for a month,” she said. “I don’t think I would have stayed in the closet at any other place. I would have been out from the start.” Stroud said it is difficult for some gay students to come out at Notre Dame for several reasons. “From the guys I’ve met and been with who aren’t out of the closet … either it is personal, they are afraid for family reasons or culture reasons, or just in general the fear of coming out,” he said. There are also internal issues students need to struggle with, Stroud said. “I wouldn’t say personally it was a fear of coming out to the Notre Dame population I was afraid of. It was maybe admitting to myself I was gay,” he said. Coming out as a female at Notre Dame is also different than coming out as a male, Lillis said, because of preconceived notions in respect to masculinity and femininity. “Guys, if they are in any way gender bending, then other men are going to label them as gay no matter what, so it’s like they might as well come out,” she said. “Whereas with girls, we can gender bend as much as we want and no one assumes that they’re gay. For a girl to come out, it definitely is much more of a personal choice than it is with a guy.” Despite the challenges he has faced as a gay student, G’Sell said he appreciates how these obstacles have been beneficial to his Notre Dame experience. “It hasn’t been without its struggles. At the same time, I don’t think that’s a problem necessarily. I think it’s good to struggle,” he said. “In a way, I’m grateful it hasn’t been a walk in the park.” The third installment of this series will examine the gay community’s underground network at Notre Dame and student experiences being in relationships on campus. It will run in Wednesday’s Observer.last_img read more

The Slatyfork Enduro, Why You Need To Be Here

The Slatyfork Enduro, Why You Need To Be Here

first_imgMark your calendars and join us, Pocahontas Trails (Poca.Trails), August 11-12 for our 4th annual Slatyfork Enduro as part of the West Virginia Mountain Bike Association Enduro Series!Established in 2013, Poca.Trails is an IMBA Chapter trail organization based in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and our members are passionate about preserving the hand cut, technically-rugged, cross-country designed trails the region is known for. And in case you haven’t heard, Slatyfork is home to old-school, world-class, root, rock, and mud-slinging singletrack that’s sure to rattle the chamois off any experienced rider. If you’ve ridden here then I’m sure you have stories to share, but if you haven’t we’re going to tell you why you need to grab your gear and head our way, but first, a bit of local insight.Just a few minutes drive from Slatyfork is access to miles of technical and unrefined trails within the Monongahela National Forest. Back in the “early days” when bikes were fully rigid, or offered 2-inch travel elastomer forks at best, word got out that Slatyfork was the place where gnar was created. Riders from around the country flocked to the area looking to test their skills, and during the area’s prime it became home to legendary xc-races races Fat Tire 50 Festival, Wild 100, and the iconic Gauley Headwaters IMBA Epic Ride.Slatyfork became an ultimate mountain bike destination, but with time the style of mountain biker changed, so did the bikes and the terrain riders were seeking. By the mid-nineties, long distant grinds over roots and rocks were out, downhill flow trails were in, and the old-school ways of xc-riding became a thing of the past. With lack of interest came neglect, and endless miles of singletrack were eventually taken over by dense brush that would eat your handlebars, windfall that made trails impassible, and severe erosion that made old rail grades mud sucking booby traps.Fortunately Poca Trails was established and came to the rescue with mattocks, shovels, and rakes in hand! Mile by mile thanks to a continuous working agreement with the Monongahela National Forest, we’ve cut, cleared, and dug out miles of forgotten trail systems. Go ahead, call us old school, but we believe the technique of sustainable, hand-cut trail design is the preferred method as the use of machinery to restore singletrack is becoming a common practice.It’s not just our slice of Nature’s playground that makes Slatyfork a place you need to visit, the local community and businesses are something special too. We’re tight-knit and without communal support Poca. Trails would cease to exist and there would be no Slatyfork Enduro. We have the Pocahontas County Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) to thank for funding trail maintenance, and for actively promoting the sport of mountain biking in the region; Snowshoe Mountain Resort for providing us with race shuttle operations, financial support and generous prize donations; and local businesses for contributing additional funds.The Slatyfork Enduro is more than just a gravity fed bike race, it’s about bringing together and creating a supportive trail community. The event is also Pocahontas Trails primary fundraiser to help with purchasing tools, insurance, and local area promotions. So when you make the decision to register, you’re not only making a commitment to get outdoors, have a great time, and experience a day of riding like no other, you’re also supporting our local trail efforts and community. So get registered, grab your gear and family, and encourage others to do the same!To view the schedule of events and more details visit:  Poca Trails Slatyfork Enduro; for race registration: webscorer; and for the overall series: WVMBA Enduro Series.The weather can be unpredictable and temperatures are likely to be ten to fifteen degrees cooler than wherever you are. Spectators are encouraged to hike and enjoy the vistas along the race course, but please be mindful of racers on the course. While you’re in the area visit the counties other attractions including: Snowshoe Bike Park, Cass Scenic Railroad, National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO,) bike or paddle the Greenbrier River Trail, trout fishing, the Scenic Highway, Cranberry Glades and more. Check Pocahontas County CVB for all the fun options.Race DetailsRace length is 22 miles, and includes two shuttles, food, music, and a great prize table and cash payout for the elite categories. Review the course profile map, then take a couple of minutes to watch the course preview. If you’re wondering, “it’s an Enduro, why two shuttles?” Without a shuttle the only other way up from the bottom of Turkey Point Connector or the Tea Creek Mountain trail is grinding up asphalt, and that seems to take the fun out of it, although a few hardy souls always choose to do the grind just because. Check out the course preview, it says 2017, but we did not change anything since it is so much fun.Stage 1 The race starts on Mine Road at the landing across from FR 844 (this is near the top, about a ¼ mile from Gauley Mountain Trailhead). Racers Meeting at 8:30, start at 9:00. From there a short warm up to Tea Creek Trailhead and gentle climb to the start of Stage 1. Though short, this stage is a blast, ¼ mile or so of rolling grade to the shelter and then turn it on – single track, natural berms, and root and rock stair steps to the finish. That takes you to the Gauley Connector, a slight grade (old logging railroad) with more roots, rocks, and ancient RR ties onto Gauley Mountain Trail to the climb up Bear Pen.Stage 2 starts at the rock chair, a short climb above the shelter. This stage is a bit longer – double track, baby rock garden to single track and then open it up on a skid grade, just over a mile of fun. The climb up Boundary is next, pretty easy up to the final push up at the spruce thicket. At the intersection, you jump on Turkey Point / Saddle Loop. This is really fun, transfer rolls / flow / short downhill.On your way to Stage 3 stop at the intersection of Boundary and Turkey Point for a short 100 ft hike to a vista of Tea Creek, Right Fork, Red Run and the surrounding mountains. The view and wilderness are breathtaking.Stage 3 starts with a bang – rock garden, short peddle to a left hand entry to an off camber skinny rock garden, then hang on for a mix of double track / single track rock and roll descent. The stage stops short of Bannock Shoals which is the transfer to the Tea Creek Campground shuttle staging area.Stage 4 After a quick shuttle up the Scenic Highway to the Tea Creek Mountain trailhead, there is a bit of a climb to the famous rock garden on Tea Creek Mountain – the start of Stage 4. This is the fitness stage – nail the rock garden, peddle some flow, and drop in. Pick your line and it is not butter, but pretty smooth.Stage 5 One more climb on Tea Creek Mountain to the final stage at the big boulder at the start of the final descent. Pure single track, downhill delight. Depending on how far back in the lineup you are, you will probably smell some hot brakes about midway down. Just when the arm pump sets in, you get to the last 1/3, a bit more technical and just as steep, watch for the babyheads – they have teeth. The finish is on the Williams River Trail. Then a short peddle to the river – pick your wading line, we lost the bridge in the flood. Shuttle back to the top (last shuttle at 4:00 pm). Head through the field on Right Fork to the Connector (short, but a joy to ride) to Gauley Mountain Trail to the landing.Thanks to our sponsors, and a huge shout to the Monongahela National Forest for the special use permit and all the hard work on the trails, Snowshoe Mountain Resort for shuttle service, the local community for support, WVMBA, and our volunteers and most of all the racers.Pocahontas Trails is an equal opportunity provider and employer.Pocahontas Trails is a Permit Holder of the Monongahela National Forest. Operating under a Forest Service special use permit.last_img read more

CUNA study reveals credit union 2014 compliance costs hit $6.6B

CUNA study reveals credit union 2014 compliance costs hit $6.6B

first_img 37SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Credit unions were walloped with $6.6 billion in regulatory burden impact in 2014, a new CUNA study will reveal in the coming weeks.Addressing CUNA’s inaugural Quarterly Membership Webinar Thursday, CUNA Chief Policy Officer Bill Hampel provided a few early numbers from the study.Hampel made it clear that credit unions suffer a one-two punch with the steep costs of regulatory burden. The CUNA survey disclosed a median compliance cost of 49 basis points of a credit union’s assets. That was coupled with a median reduction in revenue opportunity of 10 basis points of assets.The total impacts are equivalent to 20% of total credit union operating expenses and 40% of total staff expenses.“This information is just the tip of a very large iceberg,” Hampel said.The upcoming CUNA report will discuss various categories of costs, revenue impacts, how the burden has increased over the last five years and what credit unions would be able to do with those resources if they weren’t tied up dealing with regulations. continue reading »last_img read more

Manor mansion passed in at auction

Manor mansion passed in at auction

first_img2 Charlton St, Southport was passed in at auction.A SOUTHPORT mega-mansion with a Kardashian-inspired kitchen has failed to sell at auction. The property at 2 Charlton Street went under the hammer at the Palazzo Versace today.Despite a crowd of 20 attending, the property was passed in with no opening bid. The house sprawls over 5,238sq m of manicured land. Each room is themed differently.The sprawling seven-bedroom, nine-bathroom manor estate features extravagant imported decor such as a chandelier dripping Czech crystals and Ralph Lauren wallpaper, and a Tuscan-style pool and tennis court.Well-travelled, successful businesswoman and vendor Fiona Jackson stripped the manor back to its “beautiful bones” after purchasing it in 2013. A crowd of about 20 people attended the auction at Palazzo Versace.Marketing agent Michael Mahon of Queensland Sotheby’s International Realty said he would continue discussions with “three interested parties”.“There was a strong level of interest,” Mr Mahon said.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North1 hour ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa21 hours ago“One is local and the other two are from interstate.” The kitchen was custom designed to look like it could belong to a Kardashian. Or you could have a soak in this OTT bathroom.“It was so run down, but I had such an amazing vision for it,” Mrs Jackson told the Gold Coast Bulletin recently.“We travel a lot so most of the ideas and materials came from overseas.”The property has been on the market since 2015 and its campaign has included an agency change. The Tuscan-style pool area is inviting.last_img read more

Second Crown-63 Ultramax Delivered to Eagle Bulk

Second Crown-63 Ultramax Delivered to Eagle Bulk

first_imgUS-based operator of dry bulkers Eagle Bulk Shipping has taken delivery of MV Southport Eagle, the second ship from the recently acquired batch of nine Crown-63 Ultramax dry bulk sister vessels.The 2013-built vessel, previously named JS Mississippi, was purchased earlier in 2017 from Greenship Bulk Trust. The bulker, which was constructed by China’s shipbuilder Dayang Shipbuilding, has a market value of USD 18.5 million, VesselsValue data shows.Under the deal, which was first unveiled in late February 2017, Eagle Bulk Shipping reached an agreement to acquire six Crown-63 Ultramaxes, while an additional 3 ships were contingent upon final approval from Greenship’s unit holders. The approvals for the additional vessels were granted in March 2017.“We are pleased to have been able to secure this fleet acquisition of 9 quality Ultramax vessels, and look forward to having them join Eagle’s fleet over the coming months,” Gary Vogel, Eagle Bulk’s CEO, earlier said.Eagle Bulk acquired the nine ships, which would be renamed after Connecticut coastal towns, for a total of USD 153 million.With the addition of the 63,500 dwt MV Southport Eagle, Eagle Bulk’s fleet currently consists of 42 vessels on the water, including 4 Ultramax vessels, with another 7 Ultramaxes set to be delivered over the coming months. The company’s pro-forma owned-fleet will consist of 49 Supramaxes/Ultramaxes.last_img read more

The next marriage redefinition? Massachusetts lesbian ‘throuple’ expecting their first child (Video)

The next marriage redefinition? Massachusetts lesbian ‘throuple’ expecting their first child (Video)

first_imgLifeSiteNews 24 April 2014Three “married” lesbians in Massachusetts have announced they are expecting the first of several children intended for their polygamous union. But marriage advocates say the story confirms their warnings about the slippery slope created by redefining marriage and granting legal privileges based on a self-identified characteristic like sexual orientation.The three women – Doll, 30; Brynn, 32; and Kitten, 27 – are not legally married to all the members of the polyamorous coupling, something not permitted under state or federal law.Brynn and Doll have been together since 2009. However, it is Brynn and Kitten who were legally “married” in a ceremony last August; Doll was “handfasted” to both.“We had specialist lawyers draw up paperwork so our assets are equally divided,” Brynn said.They consider themselves a “throuple.” Brynn said, “I like to think of us as a romantic committee.”The idea for the ceremony, culminated when each of their fathers walked them down the aisle, came from Kitten. “Marriage had always been an important symbol of commitment for me,” she said.After the ceremony, the three set up house and divided chores, with Brynn working a 40-hour week to bring home the money, Doll cooking, and Kitten cleaning the house. And bearing the children.Kitten announced that she had used IVF to become pregnant by an anonymous sperm donor. She hopes to bear three children, one for each of the mothers. She expects to deliver the first in July.Until it occurred, proponents of same-sex “marriage” dismissed the argument that gay “marriage” would undermine monogamy. But Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, founder and president of The Ruth Institute, said she was not surprised to learn of the trio. “We have been saying for some time that once you remove the gender requirement there is no reason for marriage to be confined to only two people,” Dr. Morse told LifeSiteNews.https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/the-next-marriage-redefinition-massachusetts-lesbian-throuple-expecting-thelast_img read more

Pirates Blanked By SW Spartans

Pirates Blanked By SW Spartans

first_imgIn what proved to be a very defensive game, Greensburg fell on the road to Southwestern by a score of 5-0.The Pirates did a good job of applying pressure defensively, but a few defensive lapses allowed for Southwestern to put a few away on the Pirates in the first half. Offensively, Greensburg had a couple scoring chances late in the first half, but were stopped by some great saves from Southwestern’s keeper.The second half was much of the same for Greensburg, again playing disruptive defense for much of the half. Southwestern put one away on Greensburg with a great goal off of a corner kick. The offense for the Pirates stalled out several times, but Greensburg got shots on goal from Joseph Pacilio, Nicholas Zapfe, David Santiago, Chase Springmeyer and Vincent Pavy. Defensively, senior Trevin White played  great defense, communicated effectively and made several key saves for the Pirates.Courtesy of Pirates Coach Cody DeVolld.last_img read more

November 15, 2018 Police Blotter

November 15, 2018 Police Blotter

first_imgNovember 15, 2018 Police Blotter111518 Decatur County Jail Report111518 Decatur County EMS Report111518 Decatur County Fire Report111518 Decatur County Law Report111518 Batesville Police Blotterlast_img

McIlroy moves into contention

McIlroy moves into contention

first_img And with Mahan languishing 14 shots off the lead and Watson eight adrift, the battle for the richest prize in golf looks to be down to three players, with Horschel carding a second consecutive 66 and Kirk alongside McIlroy and Australian Jason Day following a 68. McIlroy insists the title means more to him than the money, the 25-year-old keen to end a brilliant season on a high note after four victories, including two major titles in the Open and US PGA Championship. The four-time major winner holed from 11 feet for his first birdie of the day on the second but bogeyed the fourth for the second day in succession after his drive plugged in the face of a fairway bunker. McIlroy had been frustrated by taking one step forward and one step back on Thursday, but this time took two steps forward with birdies from close range on the sixth and seventh, although another birdie chance did go begging on the par-five ninth. The 25-year-old never threatened to hole birdie putts on the 10th or 11th, but very nearly holed his approach to the 12th, his ball clattering into the pin. Fortunately for the Northern Irishman it finished just eight feet away and he holed the putt, before his round took a bizarre turn on the 14th, where his wayward drive clipped a tree and somehow dropped straight into a spectator’s shorts pocket. “I got really lucky,” McIlroy said. “It ricocheted off a tree and went straight into his pocket somehow. That ball could have went anywhere and luckily I was able to take a drop and hit it on the green and make par. “The guy probably deserved more than just the handshake that I gave him.” The world number one carded a superb 65 at East Lake – the lowest score of the week so far – to finish six under par, two shots behind halfway leader Billy Horschel, winner of the BMW Championship last week. Along with Horschel, Chris Kirk, Bubba Watson and Hunter Mahan, McIlroy knows victory on Sunday would also secure the overall FedEx Cup title – and with it a bonus of £6million. Press Association Rory McIlroy admitted he owed one spectator more than just a handshake for aiding his bid for an extremely lucrative victory in the Tour Championship in Atlanta on Friday. For the second day running McIlroy birdied the 17th and then put the icing on the cake by holing from 25 feet on the last, adding on Sky Sports 4: ” To finish like that with two birdies puts me in a great position going into the weekend.” Justin Rose carded five birdies and one bogey in a round of 66 to move to two under par overall, one ahead of Ryder Cup team-mate Sergio Garcia, who bogeyed the last for a 71. Germany’s Martin Kaymer complained of fatigue in his “marathon” effort of playing six tournaments in the last seven weeks, the US Open champion recording a 69 to lie two over par. last_img read more

Ramsey knew Kane would make splash

Ramsey knew Kane would make splash

first_img Press Association “He hasn’t surprised me,” Ramsey said. “Tottenham have been fantastic in giving their youngsters opportunities to play. “Harry has been a very good player for a long time, I known him for a long time. “I was at Tottenham for nine years and was in charge of coaching at the academy and, along with (coaches) like John McDermott and Perry Suckling, helped bring through quite a few good youngsters. “Harry has always been very dedicated, he’s a single-minded player who trains hard. “He’s scored over 20 goals now and he’s well capable of that – he’s not the kind of player who gets fazed.” The Spurs team that beat Arsenal on Saturday boasted the youngest average age of any top-flight side this season. Tottenham opened their new Enfield training complex in 2012 and Ramsey believes the shift of emphasis towards youth players is starting to bear fruit. Ramsey spent nine years coaching the youth sides at White Lane and helped Kane break into the first team under Tim Sherwood last season. Kane joined the Spurs academy in 2009 and has flourished this term, scoring his 21st and 22nd goals of the campaign in a 2-1 Barclays Premier League win over Arsenal on Saturday. QPR caretaker manager Chris Ramsey is not surprised by Harry Kane’s success this season, having worked with the striker at Tottenham’s academy. “That was massive for Tottenham and it is going to save them a lot of money because they’ve got a lot of good players in there now,” Ramsey said. “A lot of the youngsters who have come out of there and got into the first team this season have a singled-mindedness about training hard and practising every day. “That’s come out in how they’ve performed this season.” last_img read more